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Free eBook The Invention That Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technical Revolution download

by Robert Buderi

Free eBook The Invention That Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technical Revolution download ISBN: 0684835290
Author: Robert Buderi
Publisher: Touchstone; Reprint edition (March 23, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 576
Category: Engineering & Transportation
Subcategory: Engineering
Size MP3: 1330 mb
Size FLAC: 1225 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lrf doc lit rtf


The technology that was created to win World War Ii (radar) has revolutionized the modern world. This is the story of the inventors and their inventions.

The technology that was created to win World War Ii (radar) has revolutionized the modern world. Condition: Used: Good. All pages and cover are intact, but may have aesthetic issues such as small tears, bends, scratches, and scuffs. Spine may also show signs of wear. Pages may include some notes and highlighting.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -551) and index

Includes bibliographical references (p. -551) and index. The Invention That Changed the World is the great and largely untold story of the colorful band of brilliant scientists who created the microwave radar systems that not only helped win World War II but set off a veritable explosion of scientific achievements and technological advances that have transformed our daily lives.

Buderi's first book, The Invention that Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technological Revolution was published in 1996 by Simon and Schuster

Buderi's first book, The Invention that Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technological Revolution was published in 1996 by Simon and Schuster. It covers the technology of radar (RAdio Detection And Ranging), and argues how it determined the outcome of some very infamous WWII battles (.

American refinement of a British radar invention resulted in the disruption, and ultimately the cessation, of German V-1 rocket attacks on London

American refinement of a British radar invention resulted in the disruption, and ultimately the cessation, of German V-1 rocket attacks on London. After the war, Buderi points out, the work of the microwave radar pioneers resulted in a potpourri of technical advances in engineering that transformed American life, including transistors, microwave ovens, and computers, and in advances in astronomy, including radiotelescopes. THE INVENTION THAT CHANGED THE WORLD: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technological Revolution. By. Get weekly book recommendations

Touchstone Books, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York . Featured prominently in his World War II discussion of radar development.

The terms military technological revolution and revolution in military affairs are popular in Air Force and Department of Defense journals. Most interesting for airmen and military enthusiasts alike is Buderi's tale of the personalities and innovations that led to successful integration of radar into combat applications. Featured prominently in his World War II discussion of radar development were the scientists of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Radiation Laboratory, the "Rod La.

The Invention That Changed the World: How A Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technological Revolution. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster.

The invention that changed the world. How a small group of radar pioneers won the Second World War and launched a technological revolution - Buderi,R Journal Article. Additional Document Info.

The book ends with a description of the RADAR mapping of Venus on the spaceship Magellan

Recalls the group of scientists whose invention of radar during World War II contributed to the Allied victory, and chronicles their post-war achievements. The book ends with a description of the RADAR mapping of Venus on the spaceship Magellan. The book incorporates the names and biographical background of the principle players involved.

Long-Range UHF Radars for Ground Control of Airborne Interceptors. William W. Ward, F. Robert Naka. Radar Detection, Tracking and Identification for UAV Sense and Avoid Applications. The Computer in the Garbage Can: Air-Defense Systems in the Organization of US Nuclear Command and Control, 1940-1960.

The technology that was created to win World War Ii (radar) has revolutionized the modern world. This is the story of the inventors and their inventions. Photos. Line drawings.
User reviews
Phallozs Dwarfs
Something here for everyone. I wish to suggest that the average layman will get about 50% from this book. The research on radar in World War II was well done. However the author devotes most of that historical segment to its utilization in the European theater and gives short shrift to the Pacific theater. He does not even mention how radar and the proximity fuse was a game changer in the naval war against the kamikazes The rest of the book very much is devoted to further developments of radar into modern times. That is when the book really does get technical and indeed would go over the head of one who is not well read in physics
Broadraven
THE INVENTION THAT CHANGED THE WORLD by Robert Buderi is 575 pages, with 20 chapters, eight pages of black and white photographs (pages 18-26), and several diagrams and charts. The book does not much delve into the technical details of radar, and lack of an electronics background will not detract from the reading experience. In contrast, another book in the Sloan Series, CRYSTAL FIRE, requires some background in transistors for an adequate comprehension of that book. Although I never had any interest in reading World War II books, I do like WWII movies, and a reading of THE INVENTION THAT CHANGED THE WORLD will inspire any reader to have another viewing of movies that are directly relevant to this book. These movies include Battle of Britain (with the yummy Suzanna York), Sink the Bismark, Das Boot, U-571 (with actor Bon Jovi), and a Twilight Zone episode called Judgement Night.

My account of this book tracks the indicated people:

VANNEVAR BUSH. Vannevar Bush was president of Carnegie Institution in Washington DC. Bush created National Defense Research Committee (NDRC), established in 1938, in order to promote cooperation of civilian scientists with the military (page 34). He provided funding for the Radiation Laboratory (Rad Lab) at M.I.T. (page 50) and he created the Office of Scientific Research and Development, a branch of the U.S. government (page 115). Most importantly, he convinced the stubborn Ernest J. King (Chief of Naval Operations and Commander in Chief of the U.S. fleet) to give up his out-moded and wrong-headed idea that anti-submarine airplanes should only be used for defensive purposes, and that instead the U.S. should adopt an aggressive search-and-destroy effort in using U.S. airplanes and radar to hunt down and destroy German U-boats (pages 158-161).

ALFRED LOOMIS. Loomis was a Harvard law school graduate with Wall Street experience in financing public utilities. He was also interested in gadgets, and setup his own radar lab in Tuxedo Park, New York. He decided to use NDRC money to set up a radar lab at M.I.T., rather than set it up at Carnegie or at Bell Labs (page 45). This M.I.T. lab was called, "Radiation Laboratory," and was founded in Nov. 1940. Eddie Bowen introduced the cavity magnetron transmitter to the Rad Lab. Rad Lab workers also included Luis Alvarez, Ernest Pollard, I.I. Rabi, Lee DuBridge, Edwin McMillin, and Jim Lawson. Their goal was to combine the transmitting aerial and receiving aerial into one aerial (page 101). The Rad Lab focused on air-to-air, air-to-ship, and air-to-sub detection. I.I. Rabi's goal was to reduce the wavelength from 10 centimeters down to 3 centimeters. Loomis provided the innovation of conical scanning (page 109).

RECONCILING BRITISH AND U.S. TECHNOLOGY. When first compared, British radar worked better than the U.S. radar designed at M.I.T. However, when the British receiver was used with a U.S. radar unit, and when the U.S. vacuum tube was replaced with crystals (the U.S. Rad Lab workers had initially rejected crystals, but they did not realize at this earlier time that their crystals had been "burned out"), the result was a radar device suitable for mass production (the year 1941) (pages 117-118).

ROBERT WATSON WATT. Watson Watt was an engineer from Scotland, and expert on radio static and ionosphere (page 55). Watson Watt proposed radar as follows: "at a wavelength of 50 meters a transmitter sending 15 amperes through an aerial should produce a detectable echo from planes 10 miles distant and flying at 20,000 feet." (page 56). Although it was widely known in the 1920s and 1930s that planes and ships interfered with radio waves, Watson Watt added the component of pulses. Pulses is one of the things that distinguishes radar from ordinary radio waves. While pulses had earlier been used for radar, Watson Watt was the first to propose that it be used for military defense.

HERMAN GORING. Goring started the Battle of Britain in July 10, 1940, with 2400 German airplanes. However, during the previous two years, the Germans had paid little attention to the chain of radar towers erected along the English coastline, and because of this oversight, the British were able to use radar to fend off the German air invasion, using Hurricanes, and Spitfires (pages 90-97).

J. RANDALL and H. BOOT at TRE. The cavity magnetron, which provided a better way to generate microwaves, was invented by British men J. Randall and H.Boot at Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) in February 1940 (pages 82-83). Another goal of Randall and Boot was to use shorter wavelengths in radar, and this was solved by using the klystron (klystron was invented by Varian brothers at Stanford University).

EDDIE BOWEN. Eddie Bowen worked under Watson Watt while earning his Ph.D., then assigned to a secret radar laboratory in England at Orfordness, and worked on transmitter while others in the same lab worked on receiver and cathode ray (page 65), where they solved problems relating to pulse (they compressed it) and determining the height of invading airplanes (they used perpendicular antennas), and making radar system small enough to fit into airplanes (page 67). Based on these results, the British government built a chain of radar towers along the coast in 1935. In 1936, Eddie Bowen and Watson Watt moved the lab to Bawdsey Research Station. Eddie Bowen's first demonstration of airborn radar took place in Aug. 1937 (page 71), ordered radar to be installed in British airplanes (Blenheim nightfighters). We are told that, at this point in time, Germany had annexed Austria and Czechoslovakia, and had made a non-aggression pact with USSR (soon to be broken by Germany). In Sept, 1939, Hitler invaded Poland in he invaded USSR in June 1941 (page 119). The Bawdsey lab was also where engineers figured out how to coordinate the signals coming from a chain of radar towers into accurate information (filtering system) (page 90).

KARL DONITZ. Karl Donitz commanded German submarines (U-boats) which, by spring 1941, was sinking 100 per month. This period was called Die gluckliche Zeit (Happy Time). The British used ship-to-sub radar and air-to-sub radar to hunt for U-boats (page 121) and also to sink the Bismark (May 27, 1941). Denis Robinson (British) an electrical engineer was responsible for use of crystals in British receivers. Robinson collaborated with DuBridge and others at the Rad Lab at M.I.T. in designing air-to-sub radar (pages 119-125). In early 1942, Donitz started Paukenschlag (which means drum beat) which ushered in a second Happy Time, where German U-boats patrolled the east coast of the United States, singing 35 ships in three weeks, and 216 shps in three months (pages139-142). One reason Donitz was successful was that U.S. military brass (Ernst J. King) distrusted technology, was overly conservative, and also suffered from a character defect (he was overly competitive with top brass from other branches of the U.S. military) (pages 158-161). Donitz continued to sink ships in the Gulf of Mexico and Carribbean (page 151). At this time, the U.S. still did not have any program for systematically searching for and destroying U-boats.

A big advance against U-boats came from the use of the Leigh Light on British airplanes, which supplemented use of radar and was used at close range (page 154). Donitz started using devices (Metox devices) to detect British radar, within two months of initiation of the Leigh Light, allowing U-boats to escape airplanes. At this point, early 1943, it appeared that the Germans might win WWII. Eventually, Vannavar Bush, with the use of delicate diplomatic efforts, was able to convince stubborn Ernest J. King to use radar for aggressive hunt-and-destroy missions against U-boats. Thus, the combination of Vannavar Bush's policy of search-and-destroy missions using radar-equipped airplanes, Leigh Lights, and the use of phony noisemakers towed from Allied ships to trick German acoustic torpedoes, the tide was turned against Karl Donitz, and his packs of U-boats were defeated (pages 164-170).

Subsequent chapters in the book disclose warfare over German land, which included dropping "chaff" for the purpose of confusing German radar. After page 245, we learn of advances in radar through the 1980s and 1990s, for example, radio astronomy. FIVE STARS for Robert Buderi's book.
Narim
This book is a wonderful reference for me for several reasons:

1.The development of the magnetron was a major achievement by scientists in my field of expertise. I spent 15 years of my life designing other microwave devices. Two of these, called IMPATT oscillators, are now sitting on the surface of Mars (part of the Viking Project).
2.My second career, lasting 30 years, involved describing technical achievements by others. Isadore Isaac Rabi led the development of the magneton. He also encouraged others to write a series of books called the Rad Lab series. These were references I used during my early career. They were a key part of the huge advances in electronics after WWII.
3.At this stage in my career I want to understand more about the ways that engineers and entrepreneurs relate to each other.

Other books that provide different insights are:
1."Crystal Fire", by Michael Riordan
2."The Man Behind the Microchip", by Leslie Berlin
3."The Idea Factory", by Jon Gertner
Hilarious Kangaroo
Excellent history of Radar development, and subsequent uses of technology. A bit long, but could have developed its importance in connection with the proximity fuse, one of it's greatest and most secret applications in WWII. That fuze won the technical battle of ground to air defense against aircraft in the pacific, in the battle of Britain and the defense of Antwerp. Howitser applications in the Battle of the Bulge exploded in the air obliterating German troops and tanks, collapsing the German front. It required a hydraulic automated gun mount to follow a target, radar to find and track the target and a proximity fuze that could withstand 200,000 G's at firing, a delayed arming, and a miniature radar to find the target at lethal range (75 feet) and a detonator all in a case two inches round and about a foot long.