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Free eBook American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting, 1834-1853 (Material Texts) download

by Meredith L. McGill

Free eBook American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting, 1834-1853 (Material Texts) download ISBN: 0812219953
Author: Meredith L. McGill
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press; Reprint edition (April 30, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 376
Category: Enactment
Subcategory: Intellectual Property
Size MP3: 1904 mb
Size FLAC: 1241 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf lit rtf mbr


McGill's book will have a major impact on history of the book scholarship as well as upon American literary and cultural studies more .

McGill's book will have a major impact on history of the book scholarship as well as upon American literary and cultural studies more generally. Series: Material Texts.

Home Browse Books Book details, American Literature and the Culture o. .American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting, 1834-1853.

culture that is both regional and transatlantic. -American Literature The antebellum period has long been identified with the belated emergence of a truly national literature.

The antebellum period has long been identified with the belated emergence of a truly national literature.

In the early 1850s, structural changes in the book trades began to put an end to the culture of reprinting.

August 6, 2010 History. Published April 2007 by University of Pennsylvania Press. found in the catalog. American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting, 1834-1853 (Material. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Published: 3 November 2014. by University of Pennsylvania Press. in American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting, 1834-1853. American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting, 1834-1853 pp 1-44; doi:10. 3. Circulating Media: Charles Dickens, Reprinting, and the Dislocation of American Culture. Published: 3 November 2014.

The antebellum period has long been identified with the belated emergence of a truly national literature. And yet, as Meredith L. McGill argues, a mass market for books in this period was built and sustained through what we would call rampant literary piracy: a national literature developed not despite but because of the systematic copying of foreign works. Restoring a political dimension to accounts of the economic grounds of antebellum literature, McGill unfolds the legal arguments and political struggles that produced an American "culture of reprinting" and held it in place for two crucial decades.

In this culture of reprinting, the circulation of print outstripped authorial and editorial control. McGill examines the workings of literary culture within this market, shifting her gaze from first and authorized editions to reprints and piracies, from the form of the book to the intersection of book and periodical publishing, and from a national literature to an internally divided and transatlantic literary marketplace. Through readings of the work of Dickens, Poe, and Hawthorne, McGill seeks both to analyze how changes in the conditions of publication influenced literary form and to measure what was lost as literary markets became centralized and literary culture became stratified in the early 1850s. American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting, 1834-1853 delineates a distinctive literary culture that was regional in articulation and transnational in scope, while questioning the grounds of the startlingly recent but nonetheless powerful equation of the national interest with the extension of authors' rights.