Free eBook Joy of Cooking download

by Irma Von Starkloff Rombauer,Ginnie Hofmann,Ikki Matsumoto,Marion Rombauer Becker

Free eBook Joy of Cooking download ISBN: 0672518317
Author: Irma Von Starkloff Rombauer,Ginnie Hofmann,Ikki Matsumoto,Marion Rombauer Becker
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company; Reprint. edition (May 1, 1975)
Language: English
Pages: 915
Category: Cooking, Food and Drinks
Subcategory: Cooking Education and Reference
Size MP3: 1838 mb
Size FLAC: 1825 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: txt mobi azw rtf


Ships from and sold by P&M Book Revival. Cecily Brownstone Important as is the information in this encyclopedic cookbook, it's the imprint of Irma Rombauer's and Marion Rombauer Becker's personalities that makes Joy of Cooking the best loved cookbook to come out of these United States. the one book of all cookbooks in English that I would have on my shelf - if I could have but one.

This book, though not practical in today's instant gratification world, is necessary to teach those of us our grandmother's knowledge that is dying out with our grandmother's and mothers

Ships from and sold by KT Jo's Book Nook. This book, though not practical in today's instant gratification world, is necessary to teach those of us our grandmother's knowledge that is dying out with our grandmother's and mothers. Who knows how to test an oven temperature? An oven that isn't modern, has no thermometer or setting dial?

Irma Rombauer introduced us to a room in our home-the kitchen-that was to become a place of enjoyment, not just one . Joy of Cooking is a book I turn to whenever I have a question about food or cooking

Irma Rombauer introduced us to a room in our home-the kitchen-that was to become a place of enjoyment, not just one of backbreaking labor. Joy of Cooking is a book I turn to whenever I have a question about food or cooking. And trust is, to my mind, the essential quality of all great cookbooks.

Rombauer's children, Marion Rombauer Becker and Edgar Roderick .

Rombauer's children, Marion Rombauer Becker and Edgar Roderick ("Put") Rombauer, J. encouraged her to compile her recipes and thoughts on cooking to help her cope with her loss. Rombauer spent much of the summer of 1930 in Michigan, creating the first drafts that would later become Joy of Cooking.

Written by Irma Starkloff Rombauer, a St. Louisan, it was first tested and illustrated by her daughter, Marion Rombauer Becker, and subsequently it was revised and enlarged through Marion's efforts and those of her architect. Louisan, it was first tested and illustrated by her daughter, Marion Rombauer Becker, and subsequently it was revised and enlarged through Marion's efforts and those of her architect husband, John W. Becker. There are other basic cookbooks on the market, and there are fine specialty cookbooks, but no other cookbook includes such a complete range of recipes in every category: everyday, classic, foreign and de luxe. Joy is the one indispensable cookbook, a boon to the beginner, treasure for the experienced cook, the foundation of many a happy kitchen and many a happy home.

Joy of Cooking by Irma Von Starkloff and Marion Rombauer Becker (1975, Hardcover). Irma S. Rombauer Wines Cooking Cookbook Food & Drink Books. Rombauer Food & Drink Cooking Cookbook Books in English.

Marion Rombauer Becker, Irma's daughter, joined the Joy dynasty and .

Irma Rombauer self-published the first Joy of Cooking in 1931 with the small insurance payout she received after her husband committed suicide during the Great Depression. Suddenly, society wives who used to enjoy a kitchen staff no longer had the money to employ them and began cooking for themselves.

Irma Rombauer introduced us to a room in our home-the kitchen-that was to become a place of enjoyment, not . Book Description Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1975. Condition: New. Ginnie Hofmann; Ikki Matsumoto (illustrator). Seller Inventory M0672518317.

Irma Rombauer introduced us to a room in our home-the kitchen-that was to become a place of enjoyment, not just one of backbreaking labor. More information about this seller Contact this seller.

Irma S. Rombauer (October 30, 1877 – October 14, 1962) was an American cookbook author, best known for The Joy of Cooking (1931), one of the world's most widely read cookbooks. Following Irma Rombauer's death, periodic revisions of the book were carried out by her daughter, Marion Rombauer Becker, and subsequently by Marion's son Ethan Becker.

JOY OF COOKING Irma S. Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker . Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker Hardcover Used - Good. Vintage JOY OF COOKING Cookbook Hardcover Book Rombauer & Becker.

One of the best and most thorough cookbooks ever written.
User reviews
Oparae
This book, though not practical in today's instant gratification world, is necessary to teach those of us our grandmother's knowledge that is dying out with our grandmother's and mothers. Who knows how to test an oven temperature? An oven that isn't modern, has no thermometer or setting dial? Who knows the proper procedure for canning? The supplies you might need? Think you'll never need that information? When Irma Rombauer wrote this cookbook she didn't think she had a need for the knowledge being a wealthy woman with kitchen help. Then an economic collapse. Then her husband committed suicide. She was 54. Good thing she did have this knowledge and decided to pass it on. This cookbook does more than teach recipes. It teaches etiquette and dinner party directions? Do you know which fork goes where? What is the difference in dinner settings for formal and informal eating? Wedding cakes? The information in this cookbook is invaluable. Every mother, daughter, daughter in law, etc. Should have this on their shelf. I am so glad I found a 1964 edition as the 1972 edition was revised and doesn't have all the information I wanted. I don't cook in a microwave and I don't want my Joy of Cooking to reflect microwave cooking. I found and purchased a 1942 edition as wel, which includes wartime ration recipes. Get yourself a copy, if for no other reason, to learn.
Painbrand
I cannot say enough positive things about this cookbook. I have over a thousand cookbooks literally. At one point I collected them. As I have matured I have found that this single one seems to be my go-to book for anything I don't know how to cook yet. So far I have only found a couple of recipes that aren't in here. One of them is how to make green tea Mochi ice cream. For those of you who aren't familiar with it it is a specialized Japanese confectionery ice cream. Everything else has always been there along with an explanation of the philosophy behind cooking the dish. I love it. I have multiple copies of this one myself. I have already handed one of these copies down to one of my sons. I have purchased three more copies this past Christmas to give to my sons who are married so that their wives can pull up recipes for things they don't know how to cook. I would recommend this book over every other cookbook I have ever had read or seen. This is definitely the number one cookbook out there and I feel like I know what I'm talking about.
Nuadora
I bought this as a gift for a teenager who is learning to cook. He has had it for week and is fascinated with all he is learning about food and cooking basics. Within 24 hours of getting the book, he sent back a thank you gift of delicious vanilla ice cream for one of the recipes. I have given earlier editions to each of my kids, and they are still in regular use.
Kefrannan
This is the sewn-binding edition by the daughter of the original author. The subsequent version is by the grandson (I think) and, although I like the recipes in both editions just fine, there are some differences in terms of fat phobias in the later edition. With the latest findings and admissions by the FDA, we are now returning to natural animal fats (butter, lard) and avoiding processed oils. But, the main reason I bought this edition after owning the newer one (by Ethan Becker) is that it has a sewn binding. The book is composed of several smaller "booklets" that have pages the loop around at the binding and come back elsewhere in the book. Each booklet is sewn with strong thread through its binding and the booklets are glued together and form the 800-odd pages of the book. This is the RIGHT way to bind a book. The newer edition is an all glued binding, and the third or fourth time you open the book to the same place, and press it flat so the pages don't turn on you while your hands are covered in dough, the pages will start to fall out. I was sick of my "loose leaf" copy of the 2006 edition, so I ordered this and I love it so much that I threw out the newer (but disheveled) one. By the way, don't even bother with the "unauthorized" and ghost-written 1997 edition. Look it up in Wikipedia for the history of the editions.
Qwert
Still the best overall cook book- I suggest getting two editions- the 1952 one which still contains the details of how things were prepared back then along with how to make drinks for your guests from your own home bar- then the major overhaul edition with the same attention to detail but new recipes and a shift in focus- such as the 1997 version or after. Both very useful. A great overview- if you like a specific cuisine you can always get a cookbook about that specific type of food later. You'll get a lot of use out of these if you get the original version and the revamped version that came decades later. The early versions of the text still included how to prepare and cook various game animals which I don't recall as being in the newer versions with the same detail for example- nor does the newer editions tell you how to easily make the most popular drinks from times past or now. This book has gone through several printings but the 1952 and 1997 versions are the two I've gotten a lot of use from. Hope this helps.