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Free eBook PunisherMAX: Homeless download

by Steve Dillon,Jason Aaron

Free eBook PunisherMAX: Homeless download ISBN: 0785152105
Author: Steve Dillon,Jason Aaron
Publisher: Marvel (April 25, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 128
Category: Comics
Subcategory: Graphic Novels
Size MP3: 1243 mb
Size FLAC: 1843 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: docx mobi azw rtf


The Punisher MAX: Homeless ends Jason Aaron's and Steve Dillon's run The Punisher MAX series. It features a good deal of nihilism, violence, blood, and character development.

The Punisher MAX: Homeless ends Jason Aaron's and Steve Dillon's run The Punisher MAX series. The Kingpin hires the deadly ninja assassin Elektra to kill the Punisher and this leads to a grisly set of encounters and another good inspection of what type of men the Punisher and the Kingpin are. The writing is very good and will make you want to read the entire thing in one sitting.

Ships from and sold by Readmore. Ships from and sold by Chuck's Comics.

Punisher Max by Jason Aaron & Steve Dillon Omnibus.

Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).

PunisherMax: Homeless (PunisherMa. ason Aaron. Dark humor, villainous enemies for Frank to take on. I honestly cannot recommend the arc highly enough. I'm not a huge fan of Dillon's artwork in the Max universe, preferring the more realistic art that permeated Ennis' run on Max (I enjoy Ennis and Dillon's collaborations in the regular Marvel universe far more).

Books In This Series (4 Books). I started backwards and read the last Aaron Punisher Max first because it was the only one they had at my local library. Steve Dillon and great storytelling with his distinctive artistic style. Page 1 of 1Start OverPage 1 of 1. Previous page. It peaked my interest.

Punisher MAX is the second comic book ongoing series published under the MAX imprint of Marvel Comics featuring the vigilante the Punisher. The series was written by Jason Aaron and drawn by Steve Dillon. Unlike the concurrently running Marvel Universe-proper series featuring the Punisher, the MAX imprint allows the creators the freedom to write more realistic and hard-edged stories that cannot be seen in regular mainline Marvel Universe stories.

PunisherMAX is a peculiar book when compared to Ennis' run, it openly brings . HOMELESS - You were a helluva soldier, Frank.

PunisherMAX is a peculiar book when compared to Ennis' run, it openly brings in other beloved(?) marvel characters, uses them like the their regular counterparts with a bit more of a MAX touch and makes his story revolve around Punsiher, mainly through other characters. Ennis' run was mainly a six issue story with memorable characters and gangsters where everyone died at the end of each story. What really sets this apart from any other comic book is it's knack for instantly characterizing Wilson Fisk and keeping a strong hold on him. Which is really what this first arc is about, the Kingpin.

Jason Aaron and Steve Dillon’s Punisher MAX series has been outstanding, easily one of the character’s best arcs, up there with Garth Ennis’ definitive work, and among Aaron’s finest books - a masterpiece

Jason Aaron and Steve Dillon’s Punisher MAX series has been outstanding, easily one of the character’s best arcs, up there with Garth Ennis’ definitive work, and among Aaron’s finest books - a masterpiece. Having just broken out of prison at the end of PunisherMAX, Vol. 3: Frank, the Punisher is homeless, weaponless, as well as physically (and emotionally) tired.

The Punisher is at his lowest point. Homeless, penniless, gun-less. But none of this changes the fact that he's got his sights aimed squarely on the most powerful man in the country: the Kingpin of Crime. Fearing for his life and paranoid, the Kingpin brings in a new bodyguard, the best money can buy: a hard-as-nails woman going by the name of Elektra. COLLECTING: PUNISHERMAX 17-21
User reviews
MOQ
I have always had disdain for the Punisher... I really didn't care for the character in his early days, as he seemed to me like Marvel trying to cash in on a Wolverine-esque bad guy with attitude hero... I would of never believed I could like the character, much less get emotionally attached to him.

All that changed with the Ennis run on Punisher Max... I really started to find the character interesting and not two dimensional at all... I started to feel the strife on Franks destroyed life, and his inner demons.

Jason Aaron took over Punisher Max with a mission to put a memorable end on the series, and this book is that capstone. It is a fitting end, and is not cheap or commercial (like most super hero 'deaths'). It leaves one feeling sad for Frank, and the tragedies that destroyed him. I also think Nick Fury taking care of Frank's loose-ends and putting Frank's life into perspective was probably the best way you could of ended the series (one old soldier to another).

If you have not read this title then this is not the place to pick it up.... Go back and read the Ennis Punisher Max material and then all the other Jason Aaron material... I am sure that you will be pleased.
Gerceytone
Jason Aaron's run on Punisher MAX comes to a shattering conclusion with Homeless. Throughout Aaron's run, we've seen Frank Castle go toe to toe with the Kingpin, Bullseye, and his own deepest, darkest, inner-most turmoil. With Homeless, we now find Frank back on the street, and looking to take down Wilson Fisk once and for all...or die trying. Oh yeah, and there's some assassin chick named Elektra hanging around too... Jason Aaron has proved to be the best writer to tackle The Punisher since Garth Ennis' monolithic run came to an end, and like he has all this time, Aaron has proved to be a more than worthy successor. This is Frank Castle like we've never seen him before: beaten, defeated, and taking one last opportunity to dish out punishment. Steve Dillon's artwork is wonderful as always, and he remains THE definitive Punisher artist. All in all, Aaron's brilliant run may have come to an end, but it's an ever-fitting end at that for Marvel's classic vigilante anti-hero.
Samutilar
I've been a fan of the rebirthed Punisher (midwifed by J. Aaron) since Born, where we see how Vietnam shaped the character of Frank Castle long before his family's murder incarnates the Punisher. This is a perfect cataclysmic end to one of my favorite anti-heroes; Aaron has laid thick hints in earlier issues (particularly the end of Barracuda) on how revenge has ultimately eaten the heart of Castle, leaving him an empty and murderous shell of a man. Now Aaron moves in for the kill.

Castle is isolated, alone, old, and still an unrelenting badass. He'll die unnoticed, bleeding out in the mean streets of NYC with only a single friend (sort of) to mourn his passing, but he will have his revenge if it kills him. My kind of guy.

Moriturus te saluto; a variation on the old gladiator salute, and one that Castle would have understood. He was of Italian heritage, after all.
Wrathshaper
The Punisher MAX: Homeless ends Jason Aaron's and Steve Dillon's run The Punisher MAX series. It features a good deal of nihilism, violence, blood, and character development. It begins after the Punisher has escaped prison but has no weaponry, is old as hell, is being hunted by police, and criminals no longer fear him. His mission is to murder Wilson Fisk, the Kingpin. The Kingpin hires the deadly ninja assassin Elektra to kill the Punisher and this leads to a grisly set of encounters and another good inspection of what type of men the Punisher and the Kingpin are.

The writing is very good and will make you want to read the entire thing in one sitting. The art is great and clean-I think Steve Dillon draws one of the most perfect Frank Castles ever. And the action is some of the most brutal I've seen in a comic book or anywhere else, and that's considering this is a comic about the Punisher, a man who has murdered people for decades.

The only thing I think is missing from this comic are more showdowns between Elektra and the Punisher. They have one fight, and it's very good, but I thought she would relentlessly attack the Punisher and leave him with no breathing room. This is the only down side.

In all, this is a great ending to a great set of comics. It left me feeling bad about all the events in The Punisher MAX, because really no one gets out of this alive and every character receives a brutal beatdown/killing whether they deserved it or not.
Impala Frozen
This marks the end to the MAX version of Punisher and does so in style. It addresses the question of "How can a Vietnam Vet function as the Punisher in 2012?" Masterful ending. Critiques: There was a twist in a surprise romance that seemed to come from 70's grindhouse movie logic. Also, some of the author's political leanings are evident in some of the statements his characters make, but not too overwhelming. All in all, a great end to a great era.
Lahorns Gods
That's what my buddy and I started referring to Jason Aaron and Steve Dillon's work together on The Punisher. We called it that to 1) distinguish it from Garth Ennis collection in Punisher conversations and 2) it's just so powerful!
Now we both really liked Welcome Back, Frank along with the rest of the Ennis-Dillon volumes that followed but when it comes to The Punisher, Aaron and Dillon could do Frank Castle no wrong. Their take on Frank is so realistic and you can really feel for everyone involved. You'll laugh unexpectedly one minute, cry another, and sometimes even be speechless.
The entire story arc is somewhat short (Kingpin,Bullseye, Frank and Homeless) but it's so engaging that it grabs you and when it finally lets you go after 22 issues, all you can do is say, "WOW...If there is never another Punisher story, I'm ok with that. This is how it should have ended."
:)