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Free eBook Omega: The Unknown download

by Jonathan Lethem

Free eBook Omega: The Unknown download ISBN: 0785130527
Author: Jonathan Lethem
Publisher: Marvel (September 24, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 256
Category: Comics
Subcategory: Graphic Novels
Size MP3: 1856 mb
Size FLAC: 1149 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: docx mbr azw docx


Omega the Unknown book.

Omega the Unknown book.

Omega the Unknown was an American comic book published by Marvel Comics from 1976 to 1977, featuring the eponymous fictional character. The series, written by Steve Gerber and Mary Skrenes and illustrated by Jim Mooney, ran for 10 issues before cancellation for low sales. Despite its short run, it has remained as a cult classic due to its intriguing characters and unusual storytelling

Author Jonathan Lethem revives Marvel's cult classic, 'Omega: The Unknown,' and CBR .

Author Jonathan Lethem revives Marvel's cult classic, 'Omega: The Unknown,' and CBR News speaks with him about the comic he loved so much as a teenager, he paid homage to it in his seminal novel, 'The Fortress of Solitude. One of book's teenage fans was Jonathan Lethem, and nearly 30 years later, the celebrated author paid tribute to Gerber and Skrenes with multiple references to "Omega the Unknown" in his own, genre bending novel, "The Fortress of Solitude.

Vintage Books & Anchor Books. The Starlet Apartments by Jonathan Lethem. Posted by the author's publisher). English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español. The day’s party was under way. Or the previous night’s had never ended.

Jonathan Lethem is one of the most imaginative and acclaimed novelists of his Post-Millennial generation. His work is idea-heavy, and though he often references comic-book and science-fiction themes, the awards piling up around him as he taps away on his keyboard, his skillfully crafted prose, and virtuoso plotting, all keep him well-ensconced in the 'Literature' section at the local bookstore, instead of the Genre Ghettos of Science Fiction and Fantasy.

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. Jonathan Lethem & Lukas Jaeger - The Elvis National Theater of Okinawa.

Jonathan Lethem has a talent for bending literary genres

Author: Jonathan Lethem & Karl Rusnack Illustrator: Farel Dalrymple & Paul Hornschemeier.

Author: Jonathan Lethem & Karl Rusnack Illustrator: Farel Dalrymple & Paul Hornschemeier.

Jonathan Lethem’s long-evident interest in comics, for example in his 2003 novel The Fortress of Solitude . In all of this, it will be seen, Lethem draws on the idioms and traits of comic books: colors, panels, word balloons, margins, gutters, lines.

Jonathan Lethem’s long-evident interest in comics, for example in his 2003 novel The Fortress of Solitude, culminated in his 2008 reworking of Steve Gerber and Mary Skrenes’s 1976 comic book series from Marvel Comics, Omega: The Unknown. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

Omega the Unknown By Jonathan Lethem with Karl Rusnak, illustrations by Farel Dalrymple Paperback, 240 .

Jonathan Lethem's excellent retelling of Marvel's bizarre, 1970s cult classic comic book series has more post-modern twists than Banksy's graffiti. The original, published in 10 issues from 1976 to 1977, was very much like the TV show The Prisoner in that the point lay more in creating a sense of shattering paranoia than in resolving the plot or giving readers any sort of quick gratification.

Omega, a mute, reluctant super hero from another planet, shares a strange destiny with a teenager, and they both face danger when a legion of robots and nanoviruses are sent from afar to hunt the two of them down.
User reviews
Doomwarden
If only soup had wings. Feathered things come to those who wait in trees. I opened the book completely at random, and those three sentences were on the page. And, in context, they actually make sense!

This book collects the 10 issue miniseries, which rebooted the original short lived "Omega the Unknown" series from the 1970's while maintaining its spirit. The plot can be summarized "where there's robots, there's blue guys." Robots have a... habit, let's say, of taking over or destroying planets, but a blue-suited, red-caped (hmmm...) hero arrives to fight them, sometimes successfully, sometimes not. When nanomachines invade the Earth, nothing is safe, not textbooks, not action figures, not fast food. Salt, on the other hand, might be a good thing. Speaking of hands, make sure you don't lose yours, or they may turn on you.

Again, in context, this makes all makes perfect sense. Normally, I wouldn't care for the "scratchy" art style, but it fits the quirky mood of the series. If you like Grant Morrison, particularly Doom Patrol, you should like this.
Cordalas
This book was far and away my favorite comic book experience of 2008. I bought the series issue by issue when it appeared in comic stores, and then eagerly awaited the hardcover collection so I could recommend it to friends. But other reviewers have already commented on the actual story and its relationship to the late great Steve Gerber's compromised vision, so let me only add that the hardcover collection itself is wonderful and wondrously done. Dalrymple and Hornschemeier have created a fantastic shell for the collection, and the notes in the back by Lethem about his take on the Gerber original are truly priceless.

Lastly, I thought it was quite amusing that the co-author Karl Rusnak chose to give the Mink's alter ego his own name in reverse, "Kansur."
Bludworm
Some of the characters felt a bit flat, and certain tropes seem a little too standard for such an odd book. The good moments in this book (and there are many) more than redeem its sub-par elements, and the whole is something quite enjoyable indeed. Dalrymple's artwork, and guest artwork by Panter, are wonderful.
Arryar
Written by Jonathan Lethem, the author of 'Motherless Brooklyn', 'The Fortress of Solitude' and 'Chronic City', this brilliant re-imagining of Steve Gerber's bizarre 70's superhero is illustrated by Farel Dalrymple, with guest art by legendary RAW-contributor Gary Panter and highly-respected MOME-regular Paul Hornschemeier (who also handles the colors). Any connoisseurs of Sequential Art -- an appellation I love; it gets to the most basic elements of the medium, technical without being pretentious; 'Graphic Novel', which I dislike, has been the preferred term since the 90's, but excludes short story collections, Non-fiction work, and wordless comics -- should check out the single most impressive book Marvel has produced.

Jonathan Lethem is one of the most imaginative and acclaimed novelists of his Post-Millennial generation. His work is idea-heavy, and though he often references comic-book and science-fiction themes, the awards piling up around him as he taps away on his keyboard, his skillfully crafted prose, and virtuoso plotting, all keep him well-ensconced in the 'Literature' section at the local bookstore, instead of the Genre Ghettos of Science Fiction and Fantasy. Michael Chabon, who is Lethems' nemesis in every way (or perhaps Lethem is Chabons' nemesis), is also devoted to comic-books, SF, and pulp-fiction. His Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, 'The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay', told the story of two young Jewish men who left Europe for America, where they made their names in the nascent comic-book industry of the 30's with 'The Escapist'. Loosely based on the creators of Superman, Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel, it incorporates the experiences of the many young Jewish immigrants who helped build the comic-book format and the concept of Superheroes (Stan Lee, Joe Simon, Jack Kirby, Al Feldstein, Harvey Kurtzman, Bernie Krigstein, etc.). When he moved to try his hand as a comic-writer, telling the story of 'The Escapist' in a meta-textual spinoff Grant Morrison would approve of, it came out as a solid, but mostly uninspired debut in his newest medium. Douglas Rushkoff, a respected writer, created a dull mess called 'Testament' for Vertigo.

Lethem successfully makes the transition to sequential art, unlike his peers. He retains the weirdness of the 70's series and adds weirdness of his own. The character of 'The Mink', a nominal superhero whose boasting and shameless attempts at commodifying his brand contrasts with his occasional bravery and competence, is unforgettable and hilarious. This tale of an alien order of superheroes, determined to stop a nano-robotic epidemic that has wiped out planets across the galaxy, is perfectly suited for Lethem. When this plague reaches earth, turning humans into zombie-like slaves immediately compelled to build macro-scale robot warriors programmed to hunt down and kill their various Omega rivals, young Alexander Island is attacked by these Omega-hunters, losing both parents in the process. Even more disturbing, he learns that they were quite obviously not his biological parents, since they too were robots. As the incredibly bright young man finds a new home, a new school, and new friends (despite his intellect and manners), he begins to learn the secrets of his origin, and the role he must play in saving the planet he knows as home. This beautifully designed hardcover collects what is unquestionably one of the best mainstream comics of the new millennium. Farel Dalrymple is one of the most unique artists in comics and illustration, and his work on Omega the Unknown is 260 pages, two endpapers, two covers and a dust-jacket of the best art in modern mainstream superhero comics history. I know the names that people could throw like weapons in rebuttal -- Alex Ross (Marvels), Dave McKean (Arkham Asylum), Lee Bermejo (Joker), Paul Pope (Batman: Year 100), J.H. Williams III (Batwoman: Elegy), Frank Quitely (All-Star Superman), Eduardo Risso (Batman: Broken City) -- because those are the names I would throw. Those are personal favorites; but for one single virtuoso effort, Omega the Unknown is unassailable, the dark horse that takes it all. Apparently Marvel is letting this under-appreciated masterpiece go quietly out-of-print, and yet you can pick it up from marketplace sellers for the cost of shipping. It's such a great book, I had to buy a second copy... for this price, even at full price, this is a must-buy.