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Free eBook Colour of Home download

by Mary Hoffman

Free eBook Colour of Home download ISBN: 0711219915
Author: Mary Hoffman
Publisher: Frances Lincoln Ltd (December 1, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 32
Category: Books for Children
Size MP3: 1802 mb
Size FLAC: 1526 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lrf azw mbr txt


MARY HOFFMAN is the internationally acclaimed author of over 100 books for children, ranging from picture books to teenage fiction.

MARY HOFFMAN is the internationally acclaimed author of over 100 books for children, ranging from picture books to teenage fiction. Her first picture book for Frances Lincoln, Amazing Grace, has become a classic which, with its sequels in the series, has sold . million copies worldwide.

The Color of Home book. The colorful, impressionistic illustrations are a perfect complement to the wonderful text by Mary Hoffman, author of the highly acclaimed Amazing Grace. This remarkably moving picture book follows first-grader Hassan.

Both books were illustrated by George Hallensleben. Her most recent book, The Night Worker, won the 2001 Charlotte Zolotow Award.

She attended Newnham College to study English literature and University College London to study linguistics. She started writing in 1970 and has written about eighty children's books including the picture book Amazing Grace, the Stravaganza series, and the anti-war anthology Lines in the Sand. Both books were illustrated by George Hallensleben. Karin Littlewood has illustrated a number of children's books, including How Does it Feel?, by Norbert Landa, and Science Fiction Stories, by Edward Blishen.

Mary's other picture books for Frances Lincoln include The Colour of Home with Karin Littlewood and An Angel . Mary Hoffman lives in Oxfordshire.

Mary's other picture books for Frances Lincoln include The Colour of Home with Karin Littlewood and An Angel Just Like Me with Cornelius van Wright, as well as the hugely successful The Great Big Book of Families, The Great Big Book of Feelings, and Welcome to the Family, all with Ros Asquith. Their next title together will be The Great Big Body Book. Country of Publication.

The acclaimed Stravaganza series delivers a thrilling story packed with action, drama-and pirates! The new instalment in the critically acclaimed Stravaganza series transports readers to a world much like our own - but where magic and piracy come to life in the Italian town of Classe.

Mary Lassiter Hoffman (born 1945) is a British writer and critic. She has had over 90 books published whose audiences range from children to adults. One of her best known works is the children's book Amazing Grace, which was a New York Times bestseller at . million copies and a finalist for the 1991 Kate Greenaway Medal. From 2002 to 2012, she wrote the teen fiction series Stravaganza.

This remarkably moving picture book follows first-grader Hassan through his first few days at school

MARY HOFFMAN is the internationally acclaimed author of over 100 books for children, ranging from picture books . Mary’s other picture books for Frances Lincoln include The Colour of Home with Karin Littlewood and An Angel Just Like Me with Cornelius van Wright, as well as the hugely successful The Great Big Book of Families, The Great Big Book of Feelings, and Welcome to the Family, all with Ros Asquith.

Hassan feels out of place in a new cold, grey country. At school, he paints a picture showing his colourful Somalian home, covered with the harsh colours of war from which his family has fled. He tells his teacher about their voyage from Mogadishu to Mombasa, then to the refugee camp and on to England. But gradually things change. When Hassan's parents put up his next picture on the wall, Hassan notices the maroon prayer mat, a bright green cushion and his sister Naima's pink dress - the new colours of home.
User reviews
WinDImmortaL
I am a first grade teacher in the Twin Cities in Minnesota. My class of 21 students consist of children from a variety of backgrounds--caucasian, African American, Indian, Somali, Filipino, and Japanese. I'm always looking for powerful literature that address social justice issues. Children need a variety of literature to mirror their realities--and if it doesn't mirror their reality, then at the least be exposed to literature that mirrors the reality of people within their community.

"The Colour of Home" (I couldn't get my hands on the version with American spelling--not a big deal) is a beautiful story of a boy named Hassan. He leaves the war-torn country of Somalia and moves to the US. The story captures how he is unable to understand English and express himself in the unfamiliar language in his new classroom. Presented with paint, Hassan paints a memory in which his uncle is killed by gunfire. While this scene depicts violence, the pictures and words are not in any way gruesome or inappropriate for young children.

Throughout my 11 years of teaching, I've heard children talk amongst themselves during playtime. They often discuss topics that one would expect children to talk about--Pokemon, sports, Shopkins, video games, princesses, etc. However, I often hear them discussing heavy topics too--Trump, fear of being deported, war, life at a refugee camp, poverty, etc. Knowing this, I think it's important to teach traditional topics like animals, life cycles, friendship, humorous fiction, etc., However, as equally important, I think it's important to integrate some topics that touch on social justice themes--this book does just that. The story is tasteful (and yes, this includes the violent scene in which Hassan paints a painful memory) and is a great story for a teacher or parent to read to their children and provide a window to their own world or to the world of people around them. It will serve as a perfect springboard to have thoughtful and meaningful discussions in a safe and caring environment.
ALAN
The colors and understated maturity of this book make it an excellent introduction into the interior lives of child immigrants from war zones. The child understands a great deal more than he lets on in this story-just like in real life, except one wouldn't know it from the flat characters many picture books present their readers with.
LØV€ YØỮ
What a wonderful book to help begin to understand the experiences of a refugee child. I've used this with adults as well as children.
Ger
A great book to teach kids about diversity. We have many refugee children from Africa in our school and this hit home for my students.
Wrathmaster
An excellent story for so many reasons.
Maveri
Excellent book for teaching about immigrant families.
riki
Muslim children need to have picture books in which they see themselves and families. I read to kindergartners and was glad to see this book on Amazon. It appeared to be just what was missing in their library. You can imagine my disappointment to see pictures of a child hiding under a bed, guns and bullets flying through the air and expressions of fear.

This is not a book for most Muslim children, not one I would read to them anyway.
When I lived in Minneapolis, Minnesota I found that the community included a large Somalian population. Intrigued by this I tried to seek out children's books that spoke about the Somalian experience and that would be useful to our library collection. I guess I wasn't too shocked to find that there wasn't an abundance of books on the subject, but I was a bit disappointed. Then, in the course of my work, I heard about Mary Hoffman's, "The Color of Home". A beautiful picture book written by the author of the supremely popular, "Amazing Grace", I was both relieved and delighted to find the story exactly what I was hoping for. Better still, "The Color of Home" speaks to any child that has ever left a violent country and moved to America. Combining the slow acceptance of the new and different with an understanding of how talking about things can be therapeutic, this is one of those rare deeply moving picture books.

Hassan is unhappy. Having left bright colorful warm Somalia for cold colorless unfamiliar America depresses him. Though his teacher and fellow students are nice enough, Hassan has to deal with language differences and his own personal history. One day, his teacher asks him to draw a picture. He does, but fills it with the images of the blood and violence he left behind. Through the intervention of a friendly translator and talking about what he's been through, Hassan starts to feel a little better about his experiences. Slowly, he learns to adjust.

Yeah. It's a tearjerker. Mary Hoffman, aided by illustrator Karin Littlewood, kinda goes for your throat with this one. The moment it really got me was when Hassan talks about having to leave his cat behind. You see him, one moment, crouching under the bed as the boots of a soldier pass by, his hand clasping the cat to his chest in fear. The next he's leaving, reaching for the cat that's standing all alone while the family leaves. But this is not to say that the story panders with cheap emotions. If nothing else, Hoffman is entirely respectful of her subject. It's true that the book ends on a happier note. The family is now filling their house with color and Hassan is learning some new words and feeling better about everything. But it's obviously not a perfect situation. Just a better one.

The illustrations are lovely as well. Using broad watercolors, Littlewood draws realistic characters with bright cheerful colors. She's also rather good at drawing Hassan's personal paintings. They're childlike but also, at times, horrific. Combined with Hoffman's words, this book, as I said before, speaks to all kinds of children. Not just the one's escaping from brutality. It doesn't matter what your child's situation is. "The Color of Home" is one of those books that should be read to them so as to open their eyes to the world around them. It's a book that should be better known.