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Free eBook The Longitude Prize download

by Dusan Petricic,Joan Dash

Free eBook The Longitude Prize download ISBN: 0374346364
Author: Dusan Petricic,Joan Dash
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR); 4th edition (October 13, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 208
Category: Books for Children
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction
Size MP3: 1931 mb
Size FLAC: 1106 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lit doc lrf lrf


The Longitude Prize, Joan Dash, 2008. My New Shirt, Cary Fagan, 2007.

Not to be confused with Dušan Petrič. Petričić has received numerous awards for his work including an IBBY Certificate of Honour, an Alberta Book Award for his illustrations in Tim Wynne-Jones' On Tumbledown Hill and many others. In 1989 he won the Levstik Award in Slovenia for his illustrations of Guliver med pritlikavci (Gulliver in Lilliput). In 2001 the book The Longitude Prize for which he produced the illustrations won an honour at the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Awards. The Longitude Prize, Joan Dash, 2008.

The Longitude Prize," by Joan Dash, is a wonderful book for children, 9 to 12 years old, about the 18th century race for an accurate method of determining a ship's longitude. During that time, two competing systems arose for finding longitude; one was supported by scientists and astronomers, based on the.

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The Longitude Prize book.

The Longitude Prize book. Mar 06, 2009 Patricia rated it really liked it. The Longitude Prize 2000 Joan Dash Sibert Award. Even though I knew the ending to this book Dash’s narrative kept me interested. Her style, void of metaphor, simile, and flowery description, was nonetheless engaging.

As I read this wonderful book, I wondered how many good books I've missed out on simply because they were on the Young Adult shelf. Actually, I found this book in the juvenile section of our library. And I'm so glad I did! Many YA books make a great read because the prose is straightforward and unmarred by the literary flourishes that so often muddle books for the adult market. And - no small point - they have pictures!

A Robert F. Sibert Honor Book. By the start of the eighteenth century, many thousands of sailors had perished at sea because their captains had no way of knowing longitude, their east-west location. Latitude, the north-south position, was easy enough, but once out of sight of land not even the most experienced navigator had a sure method of fixing longitude. So the British Parliament offered a substantial monetary prize to whoever could invent a device to determine exact longitude at sea.

More by dusan petricic.

We shall not be moved. More by dusan petricic. A trio of tolerable tales.

Petričić has received numerous awards for his work including an IBBY Certificate of Honour, an Alberta Book Award for his illustrations in Tim Wynne-Jones' On Tumbledown Hill and many others. From 1993 to 2013, he lived and worked in Toronto, Canada.

of Wisconsin - Madison, 2001.

by Joan Dash and Dušan Petričić. Sir Isaac Newton and Edmond Halley were among the noted scientists who attempted to win the prize, along with many of the wildest crackpots. of Wisconsin - Madison, 2001. 5 Total Resources 3 Awards View Text Complexity Submit Text Complexity.

The Longitude Prize is an inducement prize contest offered by Nesta, a British lottery funded charity, in the spirit of the 18th-century Longitude rewards.

A Robert F. Sibert Honor BookBy the start of the eighteenth century, many thousands of sailors had perished at sea because their captains had no way of knowing longitude, their east-west location. Latitude, the north-south position, was easy enough, but once out of sight of land not even the most experienced navigator had a sure method of fixing longitude. So the British Parliament offered a substantial monetary prize to whoever could invent a device to determine exact longitude at sea. Many of the world's greatest minds tried -- and failed -- to come up with a solution. Instead, it was a country clockmaker named John Harrison who would invent a clock that could survive wild seas and be used to calculate longitude accurately. But in an aristocratic society, the road to acceptance was not a smooth one, and even when Harrison produced not one but five elegant, seaworthy timekeepers, each an improvement on the one that preceded it, claiming the prize was another battle. Set in an exciting historical framework -- telling of shipwrecks and politics -- this is the story of one man's creative vision, his persistence against great odds, and his lifelong fight for recognition of a brilliant invention.
User reviews
Zulkishicage
I just finished Dava Sobel's book of the same story, and turned to this out of curiosity. It's better! I found Sobel's book to be a fascinating story, but the writing by turns too terse and then too florid. Dash adds in more story telling elements and knows when more detail is helpful. The illustrations are very clever - they add much to the story.
Sinredeemer
A hugely captivating book, Dash conveys the wonderfully interesting and historically important tale with magnitude but truly gets the point across. For all you people that don't normally read non-fiction books, and to the people that do, I strongly suggest you read this book!
SARAND
I am informing you that your listing is incorrest: the book cannot be out of stock, because it is not yet printed: it is expected to be out in September 2000. This is not a review.
Kelezel
As I read this wonderful book, I wondered how many good books I've missed out on simply because they were on the Young Adult shelf. Actually, I found this book in the juvenile section of our library. And I'm so glad I did!

Many YA books make a great read because the prose is straightforward and unmarred by the literary flourishes that so often muddle books for the adult market. And -- no small point -- they have pictures!

This story of the eighteenth-century quest to claim "The Longitude Prize," a huge sum of money (equal to $12 million today) offered to the person who could solve the sticky problem of how to determine longitude at sea, has both of these qualities. The text is simple but compelling and the illustrations are entertaining.

In fact, the one drawback I found to Dava Sobel's very arresting tale of the same quest, Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time was its lack of illustrations. In a story that revolves around intricate "sea clocks" made by Yorkshireman John Harrison, you want to know what the machines looked like. Joan Dash and Dusan Petricic showed me! (I could also take a field trip to the observatory at Greenwich, England, where they're displayed. Even better!)

This is the second YA book I've really enjoyed. The first was a fictionalization of the Noah's ark story -- Not the End of the World -- and I'll be sure to look for others. It's time to enjoy my second childhood!
Milleynti
I kept putting my daughter off, not understanding that I really did need to get this book on Amazon... It was a library book, used, in great condition and a great price. We got it in time for her to read and turn in her report!
DEAD-SHOT
This is a great book, and one of the first that got me hooked on the topics of history and international relations. I found this book in high school on the YA shelf of my library, and now I am taking a grad class dealing with History and Time that goes back to this wonderful story about John Harrison. I just wish more teens, and adults, would read more books like this and less vampire trash! :)
Water
"The Longitude Prize," by Joan Dash, is a wonderful book for children, 9 to 12 years old, about the 18th century race for an accurate method of determining a ship's longitude. The author makes history come alive and explains how Britain's Parliament offered a prize of 20,000 pounds (equal to $12 million today) to anyone who found an accurate method of determining longitude at sea. As Mrs. Dash explains, the prize went unclaimed for fifty years. During that time, two competing systems arose for finding longitude; one was supported by scientists and astronomers, based on the movement of the moon. The other method was created by a village carpenter, John Harrison, using a seagoing clock. John Harrison was self-educated and had no formal credentials, so the Board of Longitude fought him "tooth and nail," when he offered his chronometer and claimed the prize. Mrs. Dash makes the race for the prize an exciting one. She shows the historical framework of shipwrecks, politics, voyages of exploration, and John Harrison's persistence against great odds, and (quoting the book jacket) "his lifelong struggle for recognition of a brilliant invention." My 10-year-old son loved this book!
I am informing you that your listing is incorrest: the book cannot be out of stock, because it is not yet printed: it is expected to be out in September 2000. This is not a review.