Free eBook Slog's Dad download

by Dave McKean,David Almond

Free eBook Slog's Dad download ISBN: 0763649406
Author: Dave McKean,David Almond
Publisher: Candlewick (February 22, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 64
Category: Books for Children
Subcategory: Growing Up and Facts of Life
Size MP3: 1164 mb
Size FLAC: 1587 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: lrf mbr rtf lit


Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dave McKean is a world-renowned artist, designer, and film director who has illustrated several books for children, including The Savage by David Almond, and Coraline, The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish, and The Wolves in the Wall, all by Neil Gaiman. Dave McKean lives in England.

Slog's Dad is a 2006 short story by David Almond and is about a boy called Slog who, sees a man he believes is his father returned from death to visit him. It was originally published in a collection of short stories and subsequently released, . . It was originally published in a collection of short stories and subsequently released, in 2010, as a stand-alone graphic novel illustrated by Dave McKean.

David Almond & Dave McKean Author Biography. David Almond, in his own words: I was born in Newcastle and I grew up in a big Catholic family in Felling-on-Tyne. I had four sisters and a brother and lots of relatives in the streets nearby. I loved playing football in the fields above the town, camping out with my friends,. Full Biography Author Interview. Name Pronunciation David Almond & Dave McKean: To quote the author, his name is pronounced "just like the nut". Other books by David Almond & Dave McKean at BookBrowse. Membership Advantages.

David Almond FRSL (born 15 May 1951) is a British author who has written several novels for children and young adults from 1998 . In 2013, Mouse Bird Snake Wolf (illustrated by Dave McKean) was published.

David Almond FRSL (born 15 May 1951) is a British author who has written several novels for children and young adults from 1998, each one receiving critical acclaim. He is one of thirty children's writers, and one of three from the UK, to win the biennial, international Hans Christian Andersen Award. For the 70th anniversary of the British Carnegie Medal in 2007, his debut novel Skellig (1998) was named one of the top ten Medal-winning works, selected by a panel to compose the ballot. His works are highly philosophical and thus appeal to children and adults alike.

The book alternates between Almond's prose and pages of wordless Dave McKean art, both telling different parts of the same story

Part story, part graphic novel - a tender slice of life and death from. The book alternates between Almond's prose and pages of wordless Dave McKean art, both telling different parts of the same story. Both can work on their own, but make a much more beautiful whole when combined. Think The Invention of Hugo Cabret in presentation.

David Almond kam über Umwege zum Schreiben. David has also collaborated with Polly Dunbar on the highly acclaimed, My Dad's a Birdman and The Boy Who Climbed into the Moon. Er arbeitete als Briefträger, Lektor und Lehrer, bevor er sich 1993 ganz dem Schreiben zuwandte. Read full description. Dave McKean is a world-renowned artist, designer, and film director who has illustrated several books for children, including The Savage by David Almond, and Coraline, The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish, and The Wolves in.

Slog’s Dad is published by Walker Books, with ilustrations by Dave McKean.

He reckons that the scruffy bloke sitting outside the pork shop is his dad come back to visit him for one last time – just like he’d said he would, just before he died. Slog’s mate Davie isn’t convinced. But how does this man know everything Slog’s dad would know? Because Slog says it really is his dad, that’s how. Slog’s Dad is published by Walker Books, with ilustrations by Dave McKean. It is also included in Half a Creature from the Sea. Books by David Almond.

By David Almond Illustrated by Dave McKean. About Slog’s Dad. The ineffable nature of grieving and belief inspires a tender, gritty, and breathtaking work of graphic storytelling from the creators of The Savage. Slogger, man, I said. Category: Children’s Middle Grade Books Children’s Picture Books.

I'm the one who's left behind. I'm the one to tell the tale. Erin Law and her friends are Damaged Children

I'm the one who's left behind. knew how they lived and how they died. Claire is Ella Grey's best friend. Erin Law and her friends are Damaged Children. At least that is the label given to them by Maureen, the woman who runs the orphanage that they live in. Damaged, Beyond Repair because they have no parents to take care of them. Sometimes there is nothing left but to run away, to run for freedom.

Dave McKean was born in Taplow, Berkshire in 1963. Dave has illustrated several children’s books

Dave McKean was born in Taplow, Berkshire in 1963. He attended Berkshire College of Art and Design from 1982-86 and, before leaving, started working as an illustrator. In 1986 he met author Neil Gaiman with whom he has collaborated on many projects since. Dave has illustrated several children’s books. The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish and The Wolves in the Walls (NY Times Illustrated Book of the Year), MirrorMask and Crazy Hair, all written by Neil Gaiman. Varjak Paw (Smarties Gold Award), The Outlaw Varjak Paw and Phoenix written by SF Said, and The Savage (Liverpool Reads book of the year), Slog’s Dad, Mouse, Bird, Snake, Wolf by David Almond.

The ineffable nature of grieving and belief inspires a tender, gritty, and breathtaking work of graphic storytelling from the creators of The Savage.(Ages 7 & Up)"Slogger, man," I said. "Your dad’s dead.""I know that, Davie. But it’s him. He’s come back again, like he said he would."Do you believe in life after death? Slog does. He believes that the scruffy man on a bench outside the butcher shop is his dad, returned to visit him one last time. Slog’s friend Davie isn’t so sure. Can it be that some mysteries are never meant to be solved? And that belief, at times, is its own reward? The acclaimed creators of The Savage reunite for a feat of graphic storytelling that defies categorization. Eerie, poignant, and masterful, Slog’s Dad is a tale of astonishing power and complexity.
User reviews
Pemand
The story is great. The illustrations by David McKean are unbelievable. This is a picture book, but not for little kiddies.
Weiehan
I love almost everything Dave McKean does. His styles range from the super-rich multi-dimensional Sandman covers to the simple lines of Cages, both of which speak to me in different ways. His work in Slog's Dad, while independently interesting, didn't work for me narratively, almost certainly due to the choppy overly simplified source material. David Almond's story just fell absolutely flat. I read through this a couple of times, really hoping to find something that resonated, but nothing ever did. Sadly, I can't recommend to anyone but a McKean completionist.
Vispel
in a sentence or so: before he died, Slog's dad promised him he'd be back to visit Slog when spring came. but still, Slog's bestie Davie can't help but be suspicious when when Slog starts talking to a hobo on a bench claiming to be his dad. all Slog knows is that his dad kept his word and he has one last moment to share with him before he's truly gone.

i'm going to go a bit outside of the box with this review, and not share any other plot points of this book. it's SO much better for you to discover it on your own.

but what i WILL tell you is that this was a quick, quirky, and beautiful read. i loved Kit's Wilderness by Almond based on the blurred lines between fantasy and reality and the uniqueness of his characters. Almond brings back that signature style and pairs it with the illustrations of Dave McKean (who Almond worked with on The Savage).

the book alternates about eight pages illustration with four or five pages of print narrative told from Davie's perspective. you get a peek into where the story is going through the illustrations by McKean before Almond tells you the details. but holy moly - both story styles pack an emotional punch. the illustrations have a raw simplicity that say volumes...and the narrative is crisp, thoughtful, and refreshingly creative.

at only fifty-five pages or so, Slog's Dad is surprisingly emotional and touching. there are images that will stick in my mind and i will for sure ponder Slog's dad's life after death for a long time.

fave quote: "'They can hack your body into a hundred bits,' he'd say. 'But they cannot hack your soul.'" (pg 20)

fix er up: it happened so fast! i mean, i know that's the point. i think it's a HUGE credit to the writing and illustrations that so much happens so quickly. is this even a critique? hm.
Mardin
Reason for Reading: I have, some may call a morbid, interest in stories that deal with death. From a Christian perspective, but also how people of different beliefs grieve and deal with it and how that compares to the Christian experience.

First of all, this book was not what I had expected. The publisher's tagline "Do you believe in life after death?" and the book's summary had me expecting a story dealing with reincarnation. That couldn't be further from this book's theme. Also the publisher recommends this book for ages 10+ while myself, I can hardly recommend the book for children at all. It is very emotional, deep and profound. The discussion of death is brutally honest and I can't imagine a child not being either scared by it, or if they have experienced the death of a parent that it might reopen old wounds and make the child bitter as to why *their* parent didn't visit them.

Slog's family is Irish Catholic, though I believe the story is taking pacing in England, possibly Yorkshire due to the accent used. Slog's dad, Joe Mickley, is a garbageman, who continuously sings hymns while he works and always talks about Heaven. Whenever a problem in this life is mentioned he'll make a comment about it being better in Heaven. Everyone loves Joe. Then Joe gets a black spot on his big toe and next thing you know he's had his leg removed above the knee and been fitted with a tin leg. Time goes by and the other leg goes and eventually the neighbours see the doctor arrive at the house, then the priest, and finally the undertaker. But Slog's dad promised him on his deathbed that he would return for a visit in the spring.

The story is narrated by Slog's friend Davie and on this particular day in spring, Slog sees a homeless man on a bench and is convinced it is his father; he goes over to talk to him. Davie wants no part of it and goes into the store but when he comes out Slog is still there sitting on the bench chatting with the vagrant. When Davie joins them, the man talks to Slog as if he were his Dad. Slog is joyous. Davie is skeptical. Davie asks the man pointed questions to which he coldly looks at Davie and answers them correctly. Depending on what angle one looks at this encounter, one can believe, like Davie that the man is playing along with Slog for the sake of his belief and faith in his father's promise or one can believe with Slog that somehow, perhaps as an angel, his father was allowed one rare visit with him down from Heaven, just this once.

This story is eerie and the first half of the father dying is dark, though his faith in Heaven adds joyous light to an otherwise sad story. The second half is whimsical, perhaps supernatural, though my religion does not hold with angels walking on earth with human bodies, or perhaps just one human doing a good deed towards another in a time of need.

As far as illustrations go, they are amazing and an integral part of the book. While this story was originally commissioned as a short story for an anthology, this illustrated version adds a whole new dimension to the story. Rather than having illustrations depicting parts of the text, the book is divided into sections of text and then sections of graphic wordless illustration which also continue to tell the story. In this way the book can more likely be called a graphic novel or hybrid rather than a traditional picture book. Somewhat similar to "The Invention of Hugo Cabret" though on a much smaller, less grand scale. My rating reflects the publisher's recommended age compared to my own. Do picture books always have to be recommended for children? This story features a child as a main character but I think it will be most well appreciated by those old enough to contemplate death and their own personal beliefs in the afterlife.
Foginn
David Almond writes some wonderful and profound stories. His curious mix of magic and realism is found again in this story, which seems to be a classic example of his style.

The book is unusual though. It is a short story but it is illustrated like a graphic novel for much of it, and these illustrations curiously add a whole new dimension to the story I would otherwise have missed.

This is a beautiful book, and not one I could just put away in the attic. It is going on my bookshelf.

My primary criticism is its so short. It is a short story, and I read it during a lunch break, with time to spare. And even then I did look at the illustrations too!

Even at the Amazon reduced price (currently 6.74) this is quite a lot of money for a small story, so unless you are also inclined to keep sucj books on display somewhere, it might be better to check this one out of a library.