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Free eBook The Shamer's Daughter (The Shamer Chronicles) download

by Lene Kaaberbol

Free eBook The Shamer's Daughter (The Shamer Chronicles) download ISBN: 0805075410
Author: Lene Kaaberbol
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR); First Edition edition (May 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Books for Children
Subcategory: Growing Up and Facts of Life
Size MP3: 1379 mb
Size FLAC: 1217 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: mobi docx mbr rtf


The Shamer's Daughter is a great fantasy novel set in a somewhat medieval world 2. Shamers. The main character, Dina, is the daughter of the local Shamer

The Shamer's Daughter is a great fantasy novel set in a somewhat medieval world. There are two fantasy elements to this world that really make the book stand out: 1. DRAGONS. The main character, Dina, is the daughter of the local Shamer. Both she and her mother possess the "gift" of Shaming - they can look someone in the eye and read their deepest secrets. The Shamer can use this skill to determine a person's guilt after a crime and to bring that person to their knees from debilitating shame. In the novel, a murder has been committed and the Shamer is called upon to find the murderer.

The Shamer's Daughter is a great fantasy novel set in a somewhat medieval world 2.

PRAISE FOR The Shamer Chronicles ‘An absorbing and fast-paced fantasymystery bursting with action and . Bulletin of the center for children’s books.

PRAISE FOR The Shamer Chronicles ‘An absorbing and fast-paced fantasymystery bursting with action and intrigue. The series as a whole is in good standing alongside Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy and C. S. Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia’.

The Shamer Chronicles Series. 4 primary works, 6 total works. Book 1. The Shamer's Daughter. Danish (original) title: Skammerserien. Dina has unwillingly inherited her mother's gift

The Shamer's Daughter (Danish: Skammerens datter) is a 2015 Danish action fantasy film, directed by Kenneth Kainz. It was based on Lene Kaaberbøl's eponymous book

The Shamer's Daughter (Danish: Skammerens datter) is a 2015 Danish action fantasy film, directed by Kenneth Kainz. It was based on Lene Kaaberbøl's eponymous book. The King of Dunark has been murdered along with his pregnant wife and his 4-year-old son. The apparent killer is the King's elder son, Nicodemus Ravens (Jakob Oftebro), and has been found dead drunk, holding a dagger in his hand. But so long as he does not admit to his crime, he cannot be found guilty.

"Booklist "Kaaberbol has written an absorbing and fast-paced fantasy/mystery bursting with action and intrigue. The only questions is: when will the next one come out?" -

"Booklist "Kaaberbol has written an absorbing and fast-paced fantasy/mystery bursting with action and intrigue. The only questions is: when will the next one come out?" - "Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books "No-holds barred, high energy adventure.

Fandoms: Shamer Chronicles - Lene Kaaberbol. Teen And Up Audiences. On the way there they meet up with Nico, and Davin soon starts to suspect that there's something going on between his sister and his friend

Fandoms: Shamer Chronicles - Lene Kaaberbol. Choose Not To Use Archive Warnings. On the way there they meet up with Nico, and Davin soon starts to suspect that there's something going on between his sister and his friend. But as Davin himself says, he's generally not the quickest to catch on to who has feelings for whom.

The Shamer's Daughter. Shamer Chronicles (Volume 1) Lene Kaaberbol Holt Books for Young Readers

The Shamer's Daughter. Shamer Chronicles (Volume 1) Lene Kaaberbol Holt Books for Young Readers. I gobbled it up!"-Tamora Pierce, on Lene Kaaberbol's The Shamer's Daughter. Lene Kaaberbol is the author of many popular books that have been published in Denmark, and author of The Shamer's Daughter, The Serpent Gift, and The Shamer's War. She lives in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The first step into the thrilling middlegrade fantasy world of The Shamer Chronicles Dina has unwillingly inherited her. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

"It ought to be quite a show," said the squire, obviously enjoying the attention of the crowd. "The false Shamer has been convicted of witchcraft and treason and is to be executed tomorrow."I couldn't move. I couldn't breathe. I knew now where my mother was. Drakan had her. And tomorrow he would give her to the dragons.Who dares look into the Shamer's eyes?Dina has unwillingly inherited her mother's gift: the ability to elicit shamed confessions simply by looking into someone's eyes. To Dina, however, these powers are not a gift but a curse. Surrounded by hostility and fear, she longs for simple friendship. But when her mother is called to Dunark Castle to uncover the truth about a bloody triple murder, Dina must come to terms with her Shamer's eyes-or let her mother fall prey to the vicious and revolting dragons of Dunark. And one of those dragons is human.
User reviews
Painshade
The Shamer's Daughter is a great fantasy novel set in a somewhat medieval world. There are two fantasy elements to this world that really make the book stand out:

1. DRAGONS. And not just any dragons. These are vicious, terrifying dragons that drip poison from their fangs. These dragons tear apart people and goats in seconds. The danger is palpable and violence is vivid.

2. Shamers. The main character, Dina, is the daughter of the local Shamer. Both she and her mother possess the "gift" of Shaming - they can look someone in the eye and read their deepest secrets. The Shamer can use this skill to determine a person's guilt after a crime and to bring that person to their knees from debilitating shame.

In the novel, a murder has been committed and the Shamer is called upon to find the murderer. Ultimately, Dina finds herself caught up in a dangerous chess-match that threatens to trade her mother's life for political power.

Although the plot is somewhat predictable, I found the story fun to read with enjoyable pacing. I especially enjoyed the fact that the female protagonist intelligent, brave, and believable. I think most middle school readers will LOVE this book!

Appropriate for grades 7-10
Wetiwavas
Such a great premise and the story delivered. The characters were compelling and the world building excellent. Highly recommend.
Fecage
I liked this book.
Jazu
I love this book
Gna
i can only say that all the shamer series are good books to read what ever your age.but if your looking for swearing /gore you will not get that from these books and i think that is good. again thanks lene mrs parker
Jugami
This is the cozy fantasy I was looking for. Well, maybe "cozy" isn't the right word, but it's well written. Good characters, good conflict, and good premise.

Said premise is that "shaming" is the magic here, which really means looking into the subject's eyes and making him feel guilty enough to confess his crimes. Sort of like Ghost Rider's "penance stare", only it's in Eragon. That's a solid setting in itself, but the characters are interesting enough to carry it, especially when it becomes a murder mystery and political throne-grabbing.

It reminded me of "Far Far Away" in terms of style. Maybe that's the translation at work. There is no slowness (maybe because it's YA, which also means it's not too long), and I see potential for storylines in the next sequence. Characters are not douchebags and no one holds an idiot ball, but there are a few trappings, like evil princes and dumb peasants. It's one of the few books of a series that makes me want to find out what happens next.
wanderpool
This was an enjoyable MG book. I like the concept of a “Shamer” – someone who can see what you are ashamed of/feeling guilty about and is often called in to determine who is guilty or innocent of a crime. My favorite part of the book was the exploration, through the mind of Dina – the Shamer’s daughter who has inherited her mother’s ability – of just how difficult it would be to deal with this ability as a child. No childhood friend wants a Shamer around to be able to see their secret bad acts, and to make them feel guilty about them. Even adults shun the Shamer-child. So, naturally Dina hates her “gift” and just wishes for friendship – someone who can look her in the eye.

Of course, you can imagine the twist if a consciousless person commits a bad act…

This was an entertaining story of a young girl who has to rely on her inner strength and her “gift” to save her mother, and who, along the way, learns to appreciate her talent and… of course, finds a friend.

My only complaint, and it’s my own fault, is that this is book one in a series – something I didn’t notice. For that reason, the end is not as strong and “complete” as it would be in a stand alone. Thankfully, it doesn’t leave you with an annoying cliffhanger, but it definitely sets up for the next book. I’m planning to read the next book as soon as it is translated from Danish to English and is available here!
What a cool concept! The Shamer's Daughter follows eleven-year-old Dina, who is the daughter of something called a Shamer. Shamers' powers, which are inherited genetically, allow the Shamer to look anyone in the eye and force them to relive all of their shameful memories and confess their bad deeds.

The Shamer's gift is rare and the few around, like Dina's mother, are called on to settle legal disputes. This turns south when she is called to prove a man guilty in the matter of a royal murder - and the royal family doesn't like when she turns the blame on them.

When I picked up The Shamer's Daughter at the library, I didn't know it was targeted at such a young audience. Since the main character is 11, I'm assuming that the target audience is probably 8-12. I can understand a lot of the two-star reviews I'm seeing from fellow adults like myself, but I can see my younger self loving this book.

It's one of those YA books that straddles the lines of the genre. There is legitimate danger, graphic descriptions, foul language, and all those edgy things that tweens love to feel mature in reading.

However, the reason it wasn't too interesting to me as an adult was how simple characters and relationships were. Everyone Dina met was either a friend or a foe, and once someone was a friend, they were automatically a part of the "hero team" and a main character, no questions asked.

Had to give it a three-star since I'm sure younger kids would love it, though it wasn't my cup of tea. I'd suggest passing it on to an advanced young reader who loves fantasy.