» » Fifth Chinese Daughter

Free eBook Fifth Chinese Daughter download

by Jane Snow Wong,Kathryn Uhl

Free eBook Fifth Chinese Daughter download ISBN: 0060147318
Author: Jane Snow Wong,Kathryn Uhl
Publisher: Harpercollins (June 1, 1950)
Language: English
Pages: 246
Category: Books for Children
Subcategory: Geography and Cultures
Size MP3: 1898 mb
Size FLAC: 1286 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: lit docx lrf doc


Jade Snow Wong spoke Cantonese exclusively the first five years of her life, and her world was wholeheartedly Chinese. From her parents, especially her father, she developed strict discipline of what was proper for a Chinese girl

Jade Snow Wong spoke Cantonese exclusively the first five years of her life, and her world was wholeheartedly Chinese. From her parents, especially her father, she developed strict discipline of what was proper for a Chinese girl. As she grew older and assimilated into American schools, she began to question her traditional Chinese upbringing.

Fifth Chinese Daughter book. This book is a literary pleasure; the illustrations of Kathryn Uhl are charming. Jade Snow Wong's writing style is different than any other because this book is based on a true story, her story. Published in 1945, this autobiography shows a young woman's metamorphosis from her early rigid upbringing to a more liberated Chinese-American woman.

Jade Snow Wong (1950/1965), Fifth Chinese Daughter, reprint, Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin, C. Jade Snow Wong (1950), Fifth Chinese Daughter, illustrated by Kathryn Uhl, New York: Scholastic Books.

Jade Snow Wong (1950/1965), Fifth Chinese Daughter, reprint, Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin, Ch. 27, "A Life Plan Is Cast", p. 273. ^ Jade Snow Wong (1950/1965), Fifth Chinese Daughter, reprint, Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin, "About the Author", . .In Memoriam: Jade Snow Wong". Jade Snow Wong (1975), No Chinese Stranger, illustrated by Deng Ming-Dao, New York: Harper & Row. Critical studies. Start by marking Fifth Chinese Daughter (Classics of Asian American Literature) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Jade Snow Wong’s autobiography portrays her coming-of-age in San Francisco's Chinatown, offering a rich depiction .

Jade Snow Wong’s autobiography portrays her coming-of-age in San Francisco's Chinatown, offering a rich depiction of her immigrant family and her strict upbringing, as well as her rebellion against family and societal expectations for a Chinese woman. Originally published in 1950, Fifth Chinese Daughter was one of the most widely read works by an Asian American author in the twentieth century. The US State Department even sent its charismatic young author on a four-month speaking tour throughout Asia.

246 p. Black and white illustrations. Here are our closest matches for Fifth Chinese Daughter by Wong, Jade Snow. The memoirs of a Chinese American woman growing up in San Francisco's Chinatown. Minor edgewear to boards. Moderate edgewear to jacket. Near fine in very good dustjacket in mylar cover.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Fifth Chinese Daughter by Jade Snow Wong .

Fifth Chinese Daughter by Jade Snow Wong 9780295968261 (Paperback, 1989) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 9 to 11 working days. Read full description.

Originally published in 1945 and now reissued with a new introduction by the author, Jade Snow Wong's story is one of struggle and achievements. These memoirs of the author's first twenty-four years are thoughtful, informative, and highly entertaining. They not only portray a young woman and her unique family in San Francisco's Chinatown, but they are rich in the details that light up a world within the world of America.

Fifth Chinese Daughter, Jade Snow Wong’s autobiography, directly and honestly relates the struggles and accomplishments of an American-born Chinese girl. Although it is an autobiography, it is written in the third person, which reflects the Chinese custom of humility

Fifth Chinese Daughter, Jade Snow Wong’s autobiography, directly and honestly relates the struggles and accomplishments of an American-born Chinese girl. Although it is an autobiography, it is written in the third person, which reflects the Chinese custom of humility. This use of the third person also reminds the reader of how difficult it is for the author to express her individual identity. The book explains Wong’s desire to prove to her parents that she was a person, besides being a female

Originally published in 1945 and now reissued with a new introduction by the author, Jade Snow Wong's story is one of struggle and achievements. They not only portray a young woman and her unique family in San Francisco's Chinatown, but they are rich in the details that light up a world within the world of America

After a unique childhood in San Francisco's Chinatown, Jade Snow Wong gained fame as an artistceramist
User reviews
Moonworm
Classic. This memoir will still be read 500 years from now. Can't say same for every memoir on the market. I read several times and recommended to many people. Bought a copy for my daughter and friends' daughters. Excellent portrayal of San Francisco Chinatown during the Interwar years. Exceptionally accurate illustrations by Kathryn Uhl. Poignant story of childhood and coming of age of a second-generation Chinese American female forging her way into American society, straddling expectations of Old World China and New World American freedom.

Jade Snow Wong spoke Cantonese exclusively the first five years of her life, and her world was wholeheartedly Chinese. From her parents, especially her father, she developed strict discipline of what was proper for a Chinese girl. As she grew older and assimilated into American schools, she began to question her traditional Chinese upbringing. This sharp observation intensified and was further encouraged when she entered college: two years at community college and the final two years at Mills College, a prestigious women's college in Oakland, California. At Mills, she further developed intellectually as professors challenged her to think independently and not just take notes and regurgitate on exams. She took her sociology class on a field trip to her father's garment sweatshop in the heart of Chinatown. Jade Snow lived with the Dean to save money so she could continue to attend Mills College.

Jade Snow Wong was a trailblazer not only as an pioneer Asian American author. She became one of America's finest ceramists, an interest she picked up during her senior year at Mills College, and continued to pursue after she graduated. Her spinning wheel at the storefront window of a Chinese herbalist was an odd spectacle in Chinatown, but Americans loved her pottery, and her unusual presence also drew foot traffic for the herbalist. That was a true symbiotic entrepreneurial relationship!

In her sequel, "No Chinese Stranger", Jade Snow Wong and her husband started the first travel agency to take American tourists to China. This second installment of her memoir is an equally fascinating read for those interested in how she spent her adult years as a wife, mother, professional ceramist, and fascinating human being.
Bajinn
I first encountered Jade Snow Wong's work in an anthology about cooking that I recently read. One of the chapters of this book was included in that book, and it was so charming, it made me curious to read more. I really enjoyed Fifth Chinese Daughter. The author was born into a traditional, hard-working Chinese family in San Francisco in the 1920s. Her early life was spent mostly around those of her own race, but once she entered kindergarten, her world opened up considerably. Her parents demanded quite a lot - unquestioning obedience, hard work, little play (it's easy to see where today's so-called Tiger parents got their ideas) and little emotional support. Jade Snow eventually finds other people to help her deal with growing up in two worlds and reconciling them as best she can. You find yourself rooting for her every step of the way - through school (including nine grueling years of Chinese school AFTER regular school), college - which was quite a struggle to get into, the working world, through to her discovery of her life's work.

The story is told in the third person, reflecting cultural disregard for the individual, and covers roughly 25 or so years of the author's life. It's a wonderful journey, and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in Chinese-American culture.
LeXXXuS
This is a book that I remember my mother enjoying when I was a preteen. Remembering that, I bought it in Chinatown in San Francisco in my 20s and after reading it I gave it to my friends third daughter. This time I bought it for someone interesting in going to Mills College.
I grew up with a school friend who was this generation of Chinese. I was never invited to her home. After reading it years later I felt closer to her. I hope the recipient of this copy is as impressed by it as I was. It is a truly memorable book.
ARE
This was for my American History class and was assigned reading. I think that if I was a high school teacher I would assign this book.
Umor
I FIRST READ MRS WONGS MEMIOR NOVEL WHEN I WAS IN SCHOOL IT WAS A BOOK FOR THE GIRLS IN CLASS TO READ I LOVED IT. IT WAS WONDERFUL.
Vijora
Jade Snow Wong writes of her life as a first-generation Chinese-American daughter. There are delightful moments all through the book, but most satisfying is the growth from a somewhat tentative daughter into an independent woman setting out on her own and achieving a career. A trifle dated based on the time, the book is nonetheless affirmative and positive. Highly recommended!
Anazan
I used to teach this book to tenth grade honors students. The curriculum was supposed to be multicultural and we paired it with a book by Lawrence Yep about growing up in San Francisco Chinatown. Some very memorable experiences within the Chinese family culture.
This is a fantatic book! I can imagine it being a best seller now, but
I'm so happy that it was a best seller in the 1950s!