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Free eBook Wild Cowboys: Urban Marauders the Forces of Order download

by Robert Jackall

Free eBook Wild Cowboys: Urban Marauders  the Forces of Order download ISBN: 0674018389
Author: Robert Jackall
Publisher: Harvard University Press; Edition Unstated edition (October 31, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 448
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: True Crime
Size MP3: 1888 mb
Size FLAC: 1618 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: docx rtf lit lrf


Wild Cowboys has a great deal to tell about the formation and operation of emerging "criminal enterprises.

Wild Cowboys has a great deal to tell about the formation and operation of emerging "criminal enterprises. Jackall is at his best when he fleshes out how police detectives single-mindedly overcame dead-end leads, sidestepped or neutralized competing units within the ranks of the police bureaucracy and parlayed fragments of accurate.

In this bloody urban saga, Robert Jackall recounts how street cops, detectives, and prosecutors pieced .

In this bloody urban saga, Robert Jackall recounts how street cops, detectives, and prosecutors pieced together a puzzle-like story of narcotics trafficking, money laundering, and murders for hire, all centered on a vicious gang of Dominican youths known as the Wild Cowboys

Dominican Americans - New York (State) - New York - Economic conditions, Dominican Americans - New York (State) - New York - Social conditions, Gangs - New York (State) - New York, Organized crime - New York (State) - New York, Wild Cowboys (Gang). Cambridge, MA. : Harvard University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station26. cebu on May 16, 2019.

Four bullet-torn bodies in a drug-ridden South Bronx alley  . of social justice and moral probity.

This book tells the story in full detail and in murder after excruciating murder of how one gang of Dominicans in New York's Washington heights section brought primal fear and lawlessness to the northern tip of Manhattan back in the bad old days. com User, April 6, 2000. In WILD COWBOYS mr. Jackall has captured a very accurate portrait of the world I work in every day.

Wild Cowboys has a great deal to tell about the formation and operation of emerging ‘criminal enterprises. information to solve several particularly vicious pieces of Wild Cowboy handiwor. nyone interested in the techniques of criminal investigation could not find a more comprehensive and readable primer than this book. Alan Mass, New York Law Journal.

Harvard University Press, 1997.

3 people like this topic. Authors and affiliations.

Four bullet-torn bodies in a drug-ridden South Bronx alley. A college boy shot in the head on the West Side Highway. A wild shootout on the streets of Washington Heights, home of New York City's immigrant Dominican community and hub of the eastern seaboard's drug trade. All seemingly separate acts of violence. But investigators discover a pattern to the mayhem, with links to scores of assaults and murders throughout the city.

In this bloody urban saga, Robert Jackall recounts how street cops, detectives, and prosecutors pieced together a puzzle-like story of narcotics trafficking, money laundering, and murders for hire, all centered on a vicious gang of Dominican youths known as the Wild Cowboys. These boyhood friends, operators of a lucrative crack business in the Bronx, routinely pistol-whipped their workers, murdered rivals, shot or slashed witnesses to their crimes, and eventually turned on one another in a deadly civil war. Jackall chronicles the crime-scene investigations, frantic car chases, street arrests at gunpoint, interviews with informants, and knuckle-breaking plea bargaining that culminated in prison terms for more than forty gang members.

But he also tells a cautionary tale--one of a society with irreconcilable differences, fraught with self-doubt and moral ambivalence, where the institutional logics of law and bureaucracy often have perverse outcomes. A society where the forces of order battle not just violent criminals but elites seemingly aligned with forces of disorder: community activists who grab any pretext to further narrow causes; intellectuals who romanticize criminals; judges who refuse to lock up dangerous men; federal prosecutors who relish nailing cops more than crooks; and politicians who pander to the worst of our society behind rhetorics of social justice and moral probity. In such an up-for-grabs world, whose order will prevail?

User reviews
Arcanefire
I began reading this book many years ago but only to re buy it again. Initially, I grew up in the upper Manhattan areas before moving to the Bronx, I was able to relate to some of the scenarios, people mention, and some of the locations described. Its some what accurate the stories mentioned but there are stuff that would never come to light, so for that reason they had to spice things up a little and add more information. I think the sources used were well sorted and context was in good order with the time settings of events. I have not yet started reading it again from the beginning with my busy schedule, since I am in the military but will definitely catch up to where I left at 8 years ago.
Tujar
good book I lived in the area when all this was going on, glad my family and I made it out safe. Scary
AfinaS
It's an exciting, easy read, and living and working in the Metro NY area I visited some of the streets and addresses referenced in the book. Amazing how far the city has come, but scary how far it can fall.
Ynye
The most singular and accurate piece of work that you will ever read regarding The Wild Cowboys. This is the real deal...anyone that grew up during this era in the Bronx and Washington Heights will confirm it.
generation of new
love it
Dominator
Great book about the old crazy New York City days.
Dont_Wory
Great
This is not an easy book to classify. The reviews from NYT and Kirkus are not flattering but I feel those reviewers lost the plot a little. Just calling this book an "unremittingly wooden tale" suggests that it was intended as entertainment rather than as piece of scholarly research.
Robert Jackall focuses his sociologist's eye on a localized crime wave amongst Dominicans living in Washington Heights. He begins with the brutal acts of wanton murder that lie at the center of the book. From there he casts his net ever wider until the reader slowly grasps the big picture.
To someone such as me, living in Britain, this is a very alien landscape. The casual acts of extreme violence, the industrial scale drug dealing, and the regular open gunplay on the streets of the Big Apple read almost like something from a Hollywood script rejected for lack of authenticity. The title, Wild Cowboys, is well chosen both for the gang that adopted the name and for its portrayal of urban mayhem.
By the end of the book the reader has a good grasp of the complex social relationships on the block, the reasons for all the extravagant machismo, and the extraordinary difficulty facing police officers investigating such crimes. Jackall does an excellent job of tracking relationships - even if he does let his unalloyed admiration for NYPD officers shine through rather often. But, hey - those guys need all the help they can get after their recent regular bad press.
I did struggle a little in the middle of the book when I thought I was going to be overwhelmed by names of new characters constantly joining the tale. However, ends are brought together well at the conclusion when Jackall traces how a wall of criminal solidarity cracks wide open to resolve itself in a series of guilty pleas.
If the cast list of War and Peace put you off reading Tolstoy - give this one a miss!