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Free eBook Out of Africa and Shadows on the Grass download

by Isak Dinesen

Free eBook Out of Africa and Shadows on the Grass download ISBN: 7560020240
Author: Isak Dinesen
Publisher: Foreign Lang Teaching & Research Press (2000)
Language: English
Pages: 462
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Specific Groups
Size MP3: 1585 mb
Size FLAC: 1502 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: txt mbr lit mobi


Originally published in the United States as two separate books: Out of Africa originally published by Random House, In. in 1938, and by Vintage Books in 1972.

Published in the United States by Vintage Books, a division of Random House, In. New York. Originally published in the United States as two separate books: Out of Africa originally published by Random House, In. Shadows on the Grass originally published by Random House, In. in 1961, and by Vintage Books in 1974. Poem by Otto Gelsted translated by Isak Dinesen.

Out of Africa is Karin Blixen's love letter to the country she called home for nearly 20 years

Out of Africa is Karin Blixen's love letter to the country she called home for nearly 20 years. There is no question but that Dinesen’s first chapter, in which she introduces herself to Africa and Africa to the world, is extremely powerful, as is her last, in which she describes her burial of her lover Finch-Hatton, and her forced departure from the land she loved. In between, however, things can get a bit poky.

Bedâr is on his way back, he announced. He will be here in two or three days

Bedâr is on his way back, he announced. He will be here in two or three days ut: There is a flight of Guinea-fowl down by the bend of the river. If you want to shoot them for Bedâr when he comes I will come out with you at sunset to show you where to find them. To the great wanderers amongst my friends, the farm owed its charm, I believe, to the fact that it was stationary and remained the same whenever they came to it.

Karen Blixen, Out of Africa and Shadows on the Grass. I have read or been told that in a book of etiquette of the seventeenth century the very first rule forbids you to tell your dreams to other people, since they cannot possibly be of interest to them

Karen Blixen, Out of Africa and Shadows on the Grass. And I had by now become used to the idea of witchcraft, it seemed a reasonable thing, so many things are about, at night, in Africa. Karen Blixen, Out of Africa, Shadows on the Grass. I have read or been told that in a book of etiquette of the seventeenth century the very first rule forbids you to tell your dreams to other people, since they cannot possibly be of interest to them. Isak Dinesen, Out of Africa and Shadows on the Grass. Everything that you saw made for greatness and freedom, and unequalled nobility.

Out of Africa, Shadows on the Grass. In Isak Dinesen's universe, the magical enchantment of the fairy tale and the moral resonance of myth coexist with an unflinching grasp of the most obscure human strengths and weaknesses. A despairing author abandons his wife, but in the course of a long.

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Out of Africa is a memoir by the Danish author Karen Blixen. The book has sometimes been published under the author's pen name, Isak Dinesen

Out of Africa is a memoir by the Danish author Karen Blixen. The book, first published in 1937, recounts events of the seventeen years when Blixen made her home in Kenya, then called British East Africa. The book has sometimes been published under the author's pen name, Isak Dinesen. In Shadows on the Grass, Blixen would describe the Somalis as aristocrats among the Africans, "superior in culture and intelligence" and well matched in terms of hauteur with the Europeans they chose to serve. Farah had been recruited to work for Bror Blixen as a steward, and Bror sent him to Mombasa to greet Karen when she got off the steamer from Britain.

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With classic simplicity and a painter's feeling for atmosphere and detail, Isak Dinesen tells of the years she spent from 1914 to 1931 managing a coffee plantation in Kenya. 462 pp.
User reviews
Gholbithris
OUT OF AFRICA,(1937). This classic nonfiction by Isak Dinesen, about her years on a farm in Africa is an eternal, much loved,worldwide bestseller; has been selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time. Its opening line, “I had a farm in Africa, at the foot of the Ngong Hills,” is one of the most famous, most quoted in all literature. The memoir, which was written nearly 100 years ago with great unsentimental clarity and intelligence, portrays a way of life that has since disappeared. The book has been made into an Oscar-winning, much loved, eternally, worldwide bestselling film of the same name.

In 1914, shortly before the outbreak of World War I, the Danish Baroness Karen Blixen arrived in Kenya, East Africa, with Baron Bror Blixen, her Swedish husband, to run a coffee farm. She was instantly drawn to the land, and the Continent; spent her happiest years there until the plantation, which was located at too high an altitude for coffee growing, failed. Blixen was forced to return to Denmark in 1931; it was there that she wrote this classic account of her experiences under her Dinesen pen name. A poignant farewell to her beloved farm, OUT OF AFRICA describes her strong friendships with the people of her area, her affection for the landscape and animals, her great love for the adventurer Denys Finch-Hatton.

In this book, the author of SEVEN GOTHIC TALES and the short story BABETTE’S FEAST, which was also made into an Oscar-winning film, gives a true account of life on her plantation in Kenya. She tells, with forthright simplicity of the ways of the country and its natives: of the beauty of the Ngong Hills and coffee trees in blossom; of her guests, from the Prince of Wales to Knudsen, the old charcoal burner, who visited her; of local native festivals. Of big game that were her near neighbors--lions, rhinos, elephants, zebras, buffaloes--and Lulu, the little gazelle who came to live with her, who was charmingly ladylike and beautiful.

There is no question but that Dinesen’s first chapter, in which she introduces herself to Africa and Africa to the world, is extremely powerful, as is her last, in which she describes her burial of her lover Finch-Hatton, and her forced departure from the land she loved. In between, however, things can get a bit poky. There is also no question but that this book, written so long ago, reflects realities of the time which some of us hope are no longer so. I have recently visited the Blixen house, and it is full of animal skins, including items which I particularly hate, those rugs with the animals’ heads still on. The writer mentions killing an animal for its pretty coat: I, and many others, I hope, believe that an animal needs her pretty coat more than any person does. The author also describes a paternalistic, maternalistic outlook on the natives; yet a native servant is beaten to death for the sin of having ridden, rather than walked, a horse home. This kind of behavior undoubtedly helped cause the bloodthirsty largely Kikuyu-dominated 1952-1960 Mau Mau insurrection in Kenya, which was aimed at white settlers and farmers, ended only with the designation of Kenya as a member of the British Commonwealth, not as a colony. But, of course, the past is past, and cannot be changed.

Ah, and the writer also says, “On the Western wall of my house there was a stone seat and in front of it a table made out of a mill-stone. This stone had a tragic history: it was the upper millstone of the mill of the two murdered Indians. After the murder nobody dared to take over the mill, it was empty and silent for a long time, and I had the stone brought up to my house to form a table top, to remind me of Denmark. The Indian millers had told me that their mill-stone had come over the Sea from Bombay, as the stones of Africa are not hard enough for the work of grinding. On the top side a pattern was carved, and it had a few large brown spots on it, which my houseboys held to be the blood of the Indians, that would never come off. The millstone table in a way constituted the centre of the farm, for I used to sit behind it in all my dealings with the Natives. From the stone seat behind the mill-stone, I and Denys Finch- Hatton had one New Year seen the new moon and the planets of Venus and Jupiter all close together, in a group on the sky; it was such a radiant sight that you could hardly believe it to be real….”

On my recent trip to Kenya, I got to sit on the stone seat behind the millstone table: see the attached picture. A very proud moment for me. This is not a perfect book, but it’s a must read.
Aradwyn
As someone currently living in Africa and who just took a vacation to Kenya, this was a wonderful read. While the second part is a little harder to get through because it is episodic, I enjoyed the richness of Blixen's language, and her understanding of Africa. She understood the people she lived and worked with, and her appreciation of their culture shines through her writing. Reading this after having seen her house was a real treat; I could imagine Karen walking through each room and looking out towards her beloved hills. If you love Africa, this is a gripping read that you should make time for at some point in your life.
Dorintrius
There are readers who may not care for this book. Don't look for a recap of the film. It's what I've come to expect when films are based on popular books. This version of Out of Africa is THE original tale of the author who lived the life. Out of Africa "the movie" was outstanding, but did not accurately depict Karen Blixen's life in Africa. We've seen movies that are "never as good as the book". It's disappointing. Sometimes the film can be better than the book. It rarely happens. I saw "Out of Africa" prior to reading the book; beautifully authored by, Isak Dinesen, a gifted story teller. I recommend it to anyone who enjoys well written stories.
Quashant
Here is an unexpected entry for the feminism reading list. Unlike Meryl Streep’s rather silly character in the movie, Baroness Blixen is a remarkably capable woman. She manages a 600 acre coffee farm, runs transport for the war, works with civil authorities and tribal leaders, and helps her neighbors the Masai by shooting the occasional lion.

Blixen’s writing is realistic because it’s autobiographical, and a realist writer in Africa naturally invites comparison with her contemporary, Ernest Hemingway. She is not a professional, though, with Hemingway’s carefully pared paragraphs. Her descriptions are beautiful, as well as precise. If you’re looking at the book on Amazon, you can see what I mean from the first few pages.

Out of Africa is a heartfelt memoir, a collection of vignettes. So, not great art but still worth a read just for the author’s style and sensibility.
Jonide
A trip to Kenya is incomplete without reading this book. Her descriptions are honest and delightful and give so much insight into the character of the land I would be lost without it. Her observations on the Kikuyu people hold as true today as they did then. The only way to really understand the Somali people is to read what they were like before colonization and see how little they have changed. Africa of old is the Africa of late, only with different clothes and better technology. That which was enchanting about them still enchants, that which was terrifying or pathetic remains the same. I have walked her estates and sat where she sat. I have driven through the Kikuyu lands she begged and bartered with the government to give to her once loyal workers. The town bustles and prospers, all because of her behind the scenes successful negotiations. I have lived with the Somali and can attest to their loyalty as individuals well as their fierceness when aroused in a group. She predicted her book might become a historical document someday, and I assure you it is. Looking over the valley of Nairobi from the Ngong Hills is a thrilling experience and a sad one at the same time. Sad that a woman who planned to die and be buried in Africa was taken from the home she loved and thrust back to where she hailed. We are the benefactors of her exile. Her book stands as monument to her own charity and a looking glass into a time forgotten.