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Free eBook Prophetess of Health: Ellen G. White and the Origins of Seventh-Day Adventist Health Reform download

by Hilldale Professor Emeritus of the History of Science and Medicine Ronald L Numbers

Free eBook Prophetess of Health: Ellen G. White and the Origins of Seventh-Day Adventist Health Reform download ISBN: 087049712X
Author: Hilldale Professor Emeritus of the History of Science and Medicine Ronald L Numbers
Publisher: University of Tennessee Press (December 1, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 335
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Specific Groups
Size MP3: 1657 mb
Size FLAC: 1272 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lrf txt mobi mbr


Origins of Seventh-Day Adventist Health Reform Paperback – August 1, 1992 This book explodes the myths surrounding Seventh-day Adventist prophetess Ellen White and her health.

Prophetess of Health: Ellen G. White and the Origins of Seventh-Day Adventist Health Reform Paperback – August 1, 1992. by. Ronald L. Numbers (Author) . This book explodes the myths surrounding Seventh-day Adventist prophetess Ellen White and her health reform visions. White and the Origins of Seventh-Day Adventist Health Reform.

An informative work on one aspect of American medical history. Prophetess of Health: Ellen G.

Ronald L. Numbers is Hilldale Professor Emeritus of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Wisconsin Madison.

Prophetess of Health book. Historian of science Ronald Numbers here examines one of the most influential, yet least examined, religious leaders in American history - Ellen G. White, the enigmatic visionary who founded the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Respected historian of science Ronald Numbers here examines one of the most influential, yet least examined, religious leaders in American history - Ellen G. Numbers scrutinizes White's life (1827-1915), from her teenage visions and testimonies to her extensive advice on health reform, which influenced the direction of the church she founded.

Seventh-day Adventists (as opposed to other Millerite groups) prospered because of the Whites’ leadership in the .

Seventh-day Adventists (as opposed to other Millerite groups) prospered because of the Whites’ leadership in the nineteenth century and growth in the past century outside North America and Europe. Despite several schisms Jehovah’s Witnesses have also grown worldwide. Numbers is Hilldale Professor Emeritus of the History of Science and Medicine and of Religious Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he taught for nearly four decades.

Although Numbers (History of Science and Medicine/Univ Читать весь отзыв. The creationists: from scientific creationism to intelligent design. Numbers (history of science & medicine, Univ Читать весь отзыв.

In Prophetess of Health, respected historian of science Ronald Numbers examines one of the most influential, yet least examined, religious leaders in American history-Ellen G. Numbers analyzes White’s life (1827–1915), from her teenage visions and testimonies to her extensive advice on health reform, which influenced the direction of the church she founded.

right here in Madison! This is probably a book you'll have no interest in at all, if the history of religion is a lost topic for you.

Ellen G. White, Seventh-day Adventist prophetess, ranks with the Mormon Joseph Smith, the Christian Scientist Mary Baker Eddy, and Charles Taze Russell of the Jehovah's Witnesses as one of four 19th-century founders of a major American religious sect

Ellen G. White, Seventh-day Adventist prophetess, ranks with the Mormon Joseph Smith, the Christian Scientist Mary Baker Eddy, and Charles Taze Russell of the Jehovah's Witnesses as one of four 19th-century founders of a major American religious sect. Yet, outside her own church of . million members, she is probably the least known. Her comparatively unsensational life and her church's reticence to expose her private papers to the scrutiny of critical scholars have contributed to this undeserved obscurity.

Book by Numbers, Ronald L.
User reviews
MisterQweene
'Prophetess of Health' is a well-balanced, thoroughly-researched, scholarly book. It is neither apologetic nor polemical. It is nn eye- and a mind-opening mine of information.

The work has succeeded admirably in doing what the author set out to do: place Mrs E. G. White firmly within the context of health reform in the 18th century, and show her invaluable contribution, among other health reformers, to the popularizing of that reform, even though her audience might have been different from theirs.

If in achieving this, he unmasks the intrigue and other unsavoury actions of some E. G. White apologists, it is a necessary side effect of uncovering the truth.
Todal
Book is in great condition.
Maximilianishe
First, I should say that I know a lot about Ellen White. I've read several of her books (some of which are quite interesting). I'm a graduate of Loma Linda Medical School, a Seventh Day Adventist school originally founded by Mrs. White. And I've even been to her house in Napa Valley, near St. Helena, California, where she had many of her "visions of the night." Ellen White was the prophet whose writings helped establish the SDA church in the 1800s. Seventh Day Adventists believe in "the spirit of prophecy," which is to say they believe God didn't stop communicating with mankind in ancient times, but rather selects certain prophets through history when a new "message" is needed (though, they seem to believe Ellen White is the only one since the early days of Christianity). In their theology, a great emphasis is placed on the Biblical books of Daniel and Revelation, which are seen to contain prophecies particularly applicable to our contemporary times. They are sometimes considered a "cult," which I think is mere bigotry. It's more accurate to see them more in line with evangelical or fundamental Christian denominations, with a few unique doctrinal beliefs.
Given that Ellen White is considered by most Adventists as second only the Bible with regards to literal inspiration, this book by Ron Numbers is seen as nothing short of blasphemy. The General Conference of Seventh Day Adventists allowed Numbers access to their vault of unpublished materials, only to find themselves "betrayed" by his ultimate conclusions. How dare he suggest that many of White's "visions" were actually copied word-for-word from some of the books in her personal library! And how dare he suggest she was used as a "pawn" in the hands of the all-male leaders of the original SDA church in trying to establish their legitimacy! In my own view, whatever the truth in these things, Numbers diminishes White a bit more than she deserves. Yet, it's hard to argue with the evidence he presents. The problem (perpetrated by the SDAs themselves) is that we're trying to interpret events of a hundred or more years ago in the light of our current "values." This is, after all, the era of "zero tolerance." Am I right, or am I right?
In this book, Ron Numbers presents a fascinating history of the Seventh Day Adventist church. From their earliest origins following the "Great Disappointment" of 1844, Numbers follows the difficult development of a new religion. They faced more than a few crises along the way. Far from the least of these was the powerful personality of John Harvey Kellogg. Yes, this is the Kellogg of the Kellogg's cereal company. Yes, he was an early Seventh Day Adventist. But Kellogg's was rather different in those days. His company was first started in an effort to produce natural health foods, as promoted by Mrs. White. (There's even an interesting anecdote in which some guy named Post toured Kellogg's factory, and Kellogg's stance that he was unconcerned that Post would copy what he was doing, as this would further the health message he so strongly believed in.) Yet, Kellogg became a "problem" to those early Adventists. He wanted more power than they were willing to grant him. Needless to say, he's now considered an "apostate" by contemporary Adventists. This is just one of several episodes that Numbers chronicles with revealing accuracy. No wonder this book was found so alarming by "the powers that be" in the 1970s SDA church!
I'm not an Adventist, in case you're wondering. But, I find these kinds of histories more than a little fascinating. Given the context, Numbers was a brave man to put this in print when he did. I'm also rather proud, in a way, that Numbers wrote this book when he was an Assistant Professor of the History of Medicine and the History of Science at the University of Wisconsin...right here in Madison! This is probably a book you'll have no interest in at all, if the history of religion is a lost topic for you. But, if you've read this far in my review, you just might discover a few items here that will reward your searching. If your goal is hostile anti-Adventism...forget it! You'll find what you want here, but what a petty argument you're pursuing. Take a broader view. See this in the context of the whole of history. What a fascinating development!
Leniga
Numbers has given us just about the only scholarly book out there on 19th century American Prophetess Ellen White, still revered as one of the founders of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church: there isn't much else out there except official Seventh-Day Adventist propaganda. Numbers is a genuine scholar, not a polemicist, and he is never personally hostile towards Mrs. White (she was generally a nice, well-meaning lady), but after his analysis of her writings there is unfortunately not much left of her prophetic claims. Hence the hostility towards this book from the Church hierarchy and the few devout Adventists who have even heard of it. However, contrary to their assertions, Numbers uses mostly Ellen White's own writings and friendly sources to reach his rather convincing conclusions. Altogether a very fair, well-written and well-researched book.
Cheber
This book is well written and should be a "must read" for Seventh Day Adventists. Numbers very skillfully demonstrates to the reader that Ellen G. White was a scheming, business minded, dishonest, plagiarist with grandiose and unfounded claims of divine inspiration. In reality, she simply stole the writings of others of her time, claiming that the content came to her by way of visions. She also used "visions" to get back at any perceived enemies and to gain agreement when her goals and desires conflicted with others.

It is inconceivable that any vaguely intelligent person could read this book (or The White Lie by Walter Rea) and entertain any illusion that White was a prophetess. Of particular interest is the fact, as Numbers points out, that a number of White's contemporaries were onto the fraud, yet many others revere her to this day.

Numbers has a very readable writing style and, in the process of exposing White, provides an interesting history of Adventism. At times, the book is "laugh out loud" funny, especially the chapter on "Sex and Short Skirts." Very nicely done. This would make a great movie. If White weren't so physically unattractive, one might even describe her at points as a cunning little minx.
Yggfyn
This book explodes the myths surrounding Seventh-day Adventist prophetess Ellen White and her health reform visions. Dr. Numbers pulls back the mysterious curtain surrounding this woman's life and reveals the true sources for her health messages. This book is all the more credible because it was written by a former Seventh-day Adventist professor of Medical History at Loma Linda University. A must-read for any Seventh-day Adventist serious about learning the truth about Mrs. White and the sources she used for her health reform teachings.