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Free eBook Fast Women: The Legendary Ladies of Racing download

by Todd Mccarthy

Free eBook Fast Women: The Legendary Ladies of Racing download ISBN: 1401352022
Author: Todd Mccarthy
Publisher: Miramax; 1st edition (May 16, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 320
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Specific Groups
Size MP3: 1917 mb
Size FLAC: 1478 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: azw docx lrf lit


You can discover these 'Legendary Ladies' for yourself by settling in for a delightful and illuminating read when you pick up this very enjoyable book by Todd McCarthy.

Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). You can discover these 'Legendary Ladies' for yourself by settling in for a delightful and illuminating read when you pick up this very enjoyable book by Todd McCarthy. This historical look at Fast Women really puts the spotlight on the 50s and 60s, when daring women could enter and win races just as the men did. Once they started being a major factor in the competition, the rules were changed (aren't they always?) and big money entered the scene, thus effectively ending the glory days of women's racing.

Start by marking Fast Women: The Legandary Ladies of Racing as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Todd McCarthy (born February 16, 1950) is an American film critic. It is a book that discusses the great filmmakers of B movies. Forever Hollywood has been played at Grauman's Egyptian Theatre for more than a decade. From 1975 to 1977, McCarthy worked for New World Pictures in Los Angeles as the director of advertising and publicity. In 2007 he wrote Fast Women: The Legendary Ladies of Racing

This is an excellent book that is very well written. I have read other books on various women in racing and this one is the best.

This is an excellent book that is very well written.

Ladies, start your engines! By Thriftbooks. com User, February 7, 2009. Nearly everyone within sound range of a TV set these days should recognize the name Danica Patrick. And deservedly so. She's currently the highest-ranked female race driver out there. Although there are some fabulous up-and-comers fast catching up to the petite speedster.

McCarthy, Todd 1950–(Daniel Todd McCarthy) PERSONAL:Born February 16, 1950, in Evanston, IL; son of Daniel .

McCarthy, Todd 1950–(Daniel Todd McCarthy) PERSONAL:Born February 16, 1950, in Evanston, IL; son of Daniel Francis and Barbara Jean McCarthy. Education: Stanford University, . In addition material on Mull, the book includes information on several women racers from the early 1900s through the 1950s and 1960s, including Suzy Dietrich, whom McCarthy describes as an "enormously cute" librarian; Denise McCluggage, who was an early friend of actor Steve McQueen; and Ruth Levy, who, in McCarthy's view, helped to make the 1950s "fabulous.

In 2007 he wrote Fast Women: The Legendary Ladies of Racing. Todd McCarthy is an American film critic. He wrote for Variety for 31 years as its chief film critic until 2010. In October of that year, he joined The Hollywood Reporter where he subsequently became chief film critic. Was born on February 16, 1950 in Evanston, Illinois, the son of Daniel and Barbara McCarthy. His mother was a cellist and served as the president of the Evanston Symphony Orchestra. His father was a rancher and real-estate developer. The Emmy statuette depicts a winged woman holding an atom. Visions of Light is a 1992 documentary film directed by Arnold Glassman, Todd McCarthy and Stuart Samuels

In 2007 he wrote Fast Women: The Legendary Ladies of Racing. He wrote about the producer/director Howard Hawks in his book, Howard Hawks: The Grey Fox of Hollywood which was published in 2000. McCarthy also wrote Des Ovnis, des Monstres et du Sexe: Le Cinéma Selon Roger Corman (2011). Visions of Light is a 1992 documentary film directed by Arnold Glassman, Todd McCarthy and Stuart Samuels. The film is also known as Visions of Light: The Art of Cinematography. The National Society of Film Critics (NSFC) is an American film critic organization.

Город: Hollywood, CAПодписчиков: 7 ты. себе: Film critic, documentary filmmaker, blog. себе: Film critic, documentary filmmaker, blogger.

An engaging, appalling but inevitably partial portrait of a woman who has navigated through countless political and personal squalls but remains irretrievably drawn to the flame of power. The Hollywood Reporter.

Select another critic . The Hollywood Reporter, Variety. An engaging, appalling but inevitably partial portrait of a woman who has navigated through countless political and personal squalls but remains irretrievably drawn to the flame of power.

In the early fifties, a hot new lineup of foreign cars arrived on the American scene -- Porsche, Jaguar, Alfa Romeo, MG, Aston-Martin -- bringing with it a new era of race car competition that would entice not only men but women. Fast Women is the story of exceptional women who competed against the best of the men, asserting themselves in the risky, macho, and highly competitive sport of auto racing. From New York to California, these fiery women burned rubber.

Among this group of daring women was lady of leisure Evelyn Mull. Mull got her start in auto racing after accompanying her husband to a race, then impulsively deciding to enter herself. She quickly became a leading driver on the amateur circuit in the late 1950s.

Unlike Evelyn, Denise McCluggage didnt come from old money. Covering the sport for the New York Herald Tribune, she was a sportswoman with the temperament of an artist. In her Greenwich Village neighborhood, there were two rare MG-TCs on the block: hers and the one belonging to a struggling young actor named Steve McQueen. It was inevitable that the two would meet and engage in a brief romance and an even longer friendship. In 1957, Denise began rivaling Evelyn for the top spot among women drivers.

Fast Women brings to life a group of intrepid women from the beginning of the sport to its heyday in the fifties in a narrative that possesses the dramatic velocity of great fiction.

User reviews
Naktilar
This is an excellent book that is very well written. I have read other books on various women in racing and this one is the best.
riki
I enjoyed reading someone else's narrative about one of my favorite lady drivers, Denise McCluggage. She paved the way for every lady racer since. Unfortunately we lost her writing talent this summer. At 82, she still enjoyed driving fast too.
Nafyn
Great book
Beazerdred
Although confined to women racing sportscars in the fifties, the book is quite interesting and reveals a number of little-known factoids. Had the author continued on into the sixties, several other oolorful and interesting women could have been included such as Janet Guthrie, Donna Mae Mims(briefly mentioned) and Patsy Kenedy(yes, one n)among others. Be that as it may, it is still a very good read.
Alien
only 15 pages of B&W photos.
Bralore
Nearly everyone within sound range of a TV set these days should recognize the name Danica Patrick. And deservedly so. She's currently the highest-ranked female race driver out there. Although there are some fabulous up-and-comers fast catching up to the petite speedster.

Before Ms. Patrick, there was Janet Guthrie and Lynn St. James, both of whom raced at Indianapolis and elsewhere. How did these women come to be competing in a sport thought to be almost the exclusive province of the male gender?

Believe it or not, since there have been automobiles and racing, there have been women drivers and racing! True. You can discover these 'Legendary Ladies' for yourself by settling in for a delightful and illuminating read when you pick up this very enjoyable book by Todd McCarthy.

This historical look at Fast Women really puts the spotlight on the 50s and 60s, when daring women could enter and win races just as the men did. Once they started being a major factor in the competition, the rules were changed (aren't they always?) and big money entered the scene, thus effectively ending the glory days of women's racing. I don't wish to imply that I'm against rules-changing: in this case, safety became the prime concern, which has helped everyone, everywhere. It's a well-known fact that racing car safety translates easily into street car safety, which has been a very good thing indeed! Were it not for air bags and sturdy seat belts, I'd not be here writing this review!

But he also gives notable space to the very early pioneers of women's racing, beginning in the the early 1900s. Just as the Europeans were the first to actually build a motor-driven vehicle, so they were the first to race them--in 1895. The first noted female driver was a Frenchwoman, Camille du Gast Crespin (that latter her husband's surname.) She was rather easily identifiable as the only woman in the races she entered, starting in 1900, as her corset commanded her to sit up straight, rather than hunch over the steering wheel as the men did! She was a bit of a dare-devil, anyway, jumping out of hot-air ballons (with a parachute) and racing speedboats.

There is a good bit about my hero, Denise McCluggage, who, until Janet Guthrie conquered Indy in the early 70s, was America's most well-known female race driver. But there were others, too: Evelyn Mull, Ruth Levy, Josie von Neumann, Suzy Dietrich and Donna Mae Mims.

If you're of a certain age, this book provides a wonderful trip down memory lane. If you're way younger than that, it's still a great ride! Unfortunately, the book does not have an index, but it does have a fabulous bibliography of books, films/TV, videos, newsletters, magazine articles, and web-sites, etc. In the manner of web-sites, not all of them are up-to-date, but they're still better than nothing. I'm grateful for such a list. Fabulous book!
Andronrad
I'm not really a racing fan, NASCAR etc doesn't do it for me. I can name about two racers with one of the being Danica Patrick. But this book isn't so much about race car driving as who was driving in a unique period of history. The fifties usually makes me thing of ladies in poodle skirts and Happy Days.

But there were a group of women who were getting behind the wheels of cars and making them spin. They were welcomed at first, and it was a fairly affordable sport. It's not only interesting to read about the time period, the races, the women involved and their families, but how it drew to an end for women.

Fast Women is not just about racing, it's about an equality rarely seen and all to soon lost. Until I picked up this book I never knew women racers existed until recently, so this was very eye opening for me.

The writing style is interesting, the book reads more like a story with facts than a dry history book. Excellent and fascinating glimpse into a world of women racing.