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Free eBook Roemer: Man Against the Mob download

by William F. Roemer

Free eBook Roemer: Man Against the Mob download ISBN: 1556111460
Author: William F. Roemer
Publisher: Donald I. Fine; First Edition edition (October 31, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 415
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Specific Groups
Size MP3: 1776 mb
Size FLAC: 1613 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: rtf lit docx doc


Roemer: Man Against the . .has been added to your Cart. Early Mob inside info and the early workings of the .

Roemer: Man Against the . Roemer a Lawyer and a boxer had his own motto "Keep Punching" which later in his career I believe got him in trouble with Giancana as he kept up a verbal personal attack on him and followed him around trying to get in a physical altercation, which got the.

Written by a tough lawman, the title could be named "Roemer: Bully against the mo. He took great joy in provoking the hoodlums and admitted that the FBI conducted illegal surveillance of hoodlums.

In the Fifties, he was an agent for J. Edgar Hoover's Top Hoodlum Program. Written by a tough lawman, the title could be named "Roemer: Bully against the mo. The book is well-written and fascinating. It almost reads like a suspense thriller in some places. In sum, while the hero is difficult to support, the book is an enjoyable read.

Retired FBI Agent William Roemer (1926-1996) details the workings of the Crime Syndicate in Chicago from the .

Retired FBI Agent William Roemer (1926-1996) details the workings of the Crime Syndicate in Chicago from the late 1940's into the 1980's - mirroring Roemer's career with the FBI. Roemer spent decades fencing with Chicago mobsters and mob bosses, including such figures as Tony Spilotro, Murray "The Camel" Humphreys, Sam Giancana, Tony Accardo, etc. Readers see how the mob operated, drawing its income from a combination of theft, fraud, gambling, sex, street taxes, and other venues, while enforcing discipline via intimidation and murder.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Man against the Mob by Roemer (Paperback) at the best .

Now, Bill Roemer, the FBI crime expert whos had more face-to-face confrontations with mobsters than anyone in law enforcement history, tells his electrifying life story.

Items related to Roemer: Man Against the Mo. His intimate knowledge of them enriches the book.

Items related to Roemer: Man Against the Mob. Roemer J. William F. Roemer: Man Against the Mob. ISBN 13: 9780804107181. Here he recalls his mob dealings, from 1950 to 1980, with Sam Giancana, Murray Humphreys (successor to Capone lieutenant Jake Guzik), Tony Accardo and dozens of others. Distinguishing between "good" bad guys who could be trusted, and "bad" bad guys, he shows that some gangland figures virtually became his friends.

William F. Roemer, Jr. (June 16, 1926 ndash; June 14, 1996) was . Roemer also developed (or tried to develop, "flip") several mob informants. The movie "Sugartime" is based on Roemer's 1989 book, Man Against the Mob. Bibliography. Roemer, William . Jr. (June 16, 1926 ndash; June 14, 1996) was an FBI agent for 30 years. He is known for his battle against organized crime and being the most highly decorated agent in FBI history. Richard Cain, an ex-cop turned mafioso, was one of those. With his efforts, he helped the Feds put away Outfit bosses like Sam "Teets" Bataglia, and Phil Alderisio within a year of their rise to leadership.

Flag as Inappropriate. Bibliography

Flag as Inappropriate. Please improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (1989) Roemer: Man Against the Mob, New York : . Fine, ISBN 1-55611-146-0. Roemer Jr. (June 16, 1926 – June 14, 1996) was an FBI agent for 30 years. After retirement he became a private attorney for businesses being muscled by the mob. He was the author of several books, including biographies on mobsters Tony "The Ant" Spilotro and Tony "Joe Batters" Accardo.

Man Against the Mob. by William F. Jr Roemer. Published January 28, 1991 by Ivy Books.

In the Fifties, he was an agent for J. Edgar Hoover's "Top Hoodlum Program." He masterminded the first electronic surveillance of a Mafia headquarters. Sam Giancana put a $100,000 contract on his life. Now, Bill Roemer, the FBI crime expert who's had more face-to-face confrontations with mobsters than anyone in law enforcement history, tells his electrifying life story. From his key role in the lives of John and Robert Kennedy, Frank Sinatra, Phyllis McGuire, and Marilyn Monroe, to the run ins with Anthony "Tony Batters" Accardo, Murray "The Camel" Humphreys and Jackie Cerone that made him the nemesis of the Chicago mob, here is a chillingly authentic account that ranks as one of the finest chronicles in true crime.
User reviews
Garr
Early Mob inside info and the early workings of the F.B.I.,Roemer a Lawyer and a boxer had his own motto "Keep Punching" which later in his career I believe got him in trouble with Giancana as he kept up a verbal personal attack on him and followed him around trying to get in a physical altercation, which got the F.B.I. sued and lost but was later thrown out on appeal Hoover said never embarrass the F.B.I. which he did,I mean if you already have him bugged why harass him?,bosses don't commit the crimes soldiers do why not follow them, bosses hobnob with celebrities.There is some great inside info in this book like,Guy Bannister was a F.B.I. agent in charge of the Communist Division and latter went on to J.F.K. fame also Roemer said if Giancana was involved in J.F.K. assassination the F.B.I. would have known as he was bugged 24/7,Tony Acardo was a shooter in the St. Valentines Day Massacre,Hoover in the early days said there was no such thing as the Mob,then Apalachin NY the Mob had a meeting of the Commission of 70 Mob bosses that was busted by NY Police which made Hoover look bad and opened the Top Hoodlum Program to concentrate solely on the Mob,L.B.J. passed a law that required Law enforcement to get a court order to place a bug, the book concentrates on the Chicago Outfit which provides great info like Mayor Daley was no Mob Mayor he just allowed them to exist in that thats who those wards were, so if your interested in the Mob and the F.B.I. from 1950-80 you'll love this book.
Dalallador
Author William Roemer, Jr. has written an interesting account of his role with the F.B.I. and his experiences in chasing down members of the Chicago mafia. The book contains numerous anecdotes involving Murray "The Camel" Humphreys, Tony Accardo,"Mad Sam" DeStephano, and, most notably, Sam Giancana. Roemer expresses grudging respect for some of the mobsters but the deaths of sociopaths such as DeStephano and Giancana are viewed with nothing but contempt.
Roemer also relates his many years of companionship with his partners in the F.B.I. The placing of "bugs" into strategic locations was a great help in gathering information but was later outlawed by President Lyndon Johnson. Near the end of his career Roemer moved to Tucson, Arizona, and spent some time dealing with an over-the-hill New York mobster Joseph Bonanno. Mobsters realize that law-enforcement officers are merely doing their duty and are not to be "hit" and would only bring unwanted negative attention towards the mob.

I found three errors in the book:
1. Page 20 lists the kidnapping of Bobby Greenlease as happening in St. Louis when it actually took place in Kansas City, Missouri.
2. Page 27 lists Al Capone behind the attempt on Johnny Torio's life when it was members of the Bugs Moran gang.
3. Page 297-298 lists the murder of Chicago Tribune writer Jake Lingle as taking place during the 1950s. Jake Lingle was murdered in June of 1930.

The book contains 392 pages of text and one set of 16 pages of photographs. I found the book to be interesting reading from an F.B.I. member's point of view and covers a lot of information on the Chicago mob as it was in the days of this F.B.I. agent.
Bragis
I liked this book a lot. The author, the late FBI Agent Bill Roemer, is a very likable guy who has an easy writing and narrative style. It was a very entertaining, enlightening, and exciting read. Pretty much the good guys' version of "Double Cross". As an amateur mob-expert, I had high expectations, and they were nearly entirely met. I only gave 4 stars though because I felt as if it could of been just a tad more "tell-all". That's not a knock of anybody but my own expectations though. Overall, this book is definitely worth the money.
TheFresh
He brags a lot about himself.
Exellent
Not a very good book. The author often takes liberty with the truth. If you read this book, take it with a grain of salt. Or two.
VAZGINO
very factual. Tough guy
Enone
Retired FBI Agent William Roemer (1926-1996) details the workings of the Crime Syndicate in Chicago from the late 1940's into the 1980's - mirroring Roemer's career with the FBI. Roemer spent decades fencing with Chicago mobsters and mob bosses, including such figures as Tony Spilotro, Murray "The Camel" Humphreys, Sam Giancana, Tony Accardo, etc. Readers see how the mob operated, drawing its income from a combination of theft, fraud, gambling, sex, street taxes, and other venues, while enforcing discipline via intimidation and murder. We also see that the mob's moderately-successful ban against drugs resulted not from social conscience but from desires for preservation - Accardo and other bosses realized that drugs brought added public disdain and extra government heat, while turning some mobsters into junkies.

This is a very readable and informative book, but it suffers a bit from a couple questionable claims plus self-boasting by the author. Still, these pages give readers a view of Chicago's mob/mafia syndicate, one that dates back to before the arrival of Al Capone.
Early Mob inside info and the early workings of the F.B.I.,Roemer a Lawyer and a boxer had his own motto "Keep Punching" which later in his career I believe got him in trouble with Giancana as he kept up a verbal personal attack on him and followed him around trying to get in a physical altercation, which got the F.B.I. sued and lost but was later thrown out on appeal Hoover said never embarrass the F.B.I. which he did,I mean if you already have him bugged why harass him?,bosses don't commit the crimes soldiers do why not follow them, bosses hobnob with celebrities.There is some great inside info in this book like,Guy Bannister was a F.B.I. agent in charge of the Communist Division and latter went on to J.F.K. fame also Roemer said if Giancana was involved in J.F.K. assassination the F.B.I. would have known as he was bugged 24/7,Tony Acardo was a shooter in the St. Valentines Day Massacre,Hoover in the early days said there was no such thing as the Mob,then Apalachin NY the Mob had a meeting of the Commission of 70 Mob bosses that was busted by NY Police which made Hoover look bad and opened the Top Hoodlum Program to concentrate solely on the Mob,L.B.J. passed a law that required Law enforcement to get a court order to place a bug, the book concentrates on the Chicago Outfit which provides great info like Mayor Daley was no Mob Mayor he just allowed them to exist in that thats who those wards were, so if your interested in the Mob and the F.B.I. from 1950-80 you'll love this book.
Author William Roemer, Jr. has written an interesting account of his role with the F.B.I. and his experiences in chasing down members of the Chicago mafia. The book contains numerous anecdotes involving Murray "The Camel" Humphreys, Tony Accardo,"Mad Sam" DeStephano, and, most notably, Sam Giancana. Roemer expresses grudging respect for some of the mobsters but the deaths of sociopaths such as DeStephano and Giancana are viewed with nothing but contempt.
Roemer also relates his many years of companionship with his partners in the F.B.I. The placing of "bugs" into strategic locations was a great help in gathering information but was later outlawed by President Lyndon Johnson. Near the end of his career Roemer moved to Tucson, Arizona, and spent some time dealing with an over-the-hill New York mobster Joseph Bonanno. Mobsters realize that law-enforcement officers are merely doing their duty and are not to be "hit" and would only bring unwanted negative attention towards the mob.

I found three errors in the book:
1. Page 20 lists the kidnapping of Bobby Greenlease as happening in St. Louis when it actually took place in Kansas City, Missouri.
2. Page 27 lists Al Capone behind the attempt on Johnny Torio's life when it was members of the Bugs Moran gang.
3. Page 297-298 lists the murder of Chicago Tribune writer Jake Lingle as taking place during the 1950s. Jake Lingle was murdered in June of 1930.

The book contains 392 pages of text and one set of 16 pages of photographs. I found the book to be interesting reading from an F.B.I. member's point of view and covers a lot of information on the Chicago mob as it was in the days of this F.B.I. agent.
I liked this book a lot. The author, the late FBI Agent Bill Roemer, is a very likable guy who has an easy writing and narrative style. It was a very entertaining, enlightening, and exciting read. Pretty much the good guys' version of "Double Cross". As an amateur mob-expert, I had high expectations, and they were nearly entirely met. I only gave 4 stars though because I felt as if it could of been just a tad more "tell-all". That's not a knock of anybody but my own expectations though. Overall, this book is definitely worth the money.
He brags a lot about himself.
Not a very good book. The author often takes liberty with the truth. If you read this book, take it with a grain of salt. Or two.
very factual. Tough guy
Retired FBI Agent William Roemer (1926-1996) details the workings of the Crime Syndicate in Chicago from the late 1940's into the 1980's - mirroring Roemer's career with the FBI. Roemer spent decades fencing with Chicago mobsters and mob bosses, including such figures as Tony Spilotro, Murray "The Camel" Humphreys, Sam Giancana, Tony Accardo, etc. Readers see how the mob operated, drawing its income from a combination of theft, fraud, gambling, sex, street taxes, and other venues, while enforcing discipline via intimidation and murder. We also see that the mob's moderately-successful ban against drugs resulted not from social conscience but from desires for preservation - Accardo and other bosses realized that drugs brought added public disdain and extra government heat, while turning some mobsters into junkies.

This is a very readable and informative book, but it suffers a bit from a couple questionable claims plus self-boasting by the author. Still, these pages give readers a view of Chicago's mob/mafia syndicate, one that dates back to before the arrival of Al Capone.