Free eBook Gravity download

by George Gamow

Free eBook Gravity download ISBN: 0486425630
Author: George Gamow
Publisher: Dover Publications; Dover Ed edition (January 23, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 176
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Professionals and Academics
Size MP3: 1610 mb
Size FLAC: 1867 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: mbr rtf lrf mobi


George Gamow Gravity Heinemann Educational Books 1962 Acrobat 7 Pdf 1. M.

George Gamow Gravity Heinemann Educational Books 1962 Acrobat 7 Pdf 1. Mb. Scanned by artmisa using Canon DR2580C + flatbed option.

Gamow's trademark humor enlivens the book quite a bit, as well as his illustrations

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Gravity. George Gamow succeeds where others fail because of his remarkable ability to combine technical accuracy, choice of material, dignity of expression, and readability. Gamow's trademark humor enlivens the book quite a bit, as well as his illustrations. On the minus side, the first chapter is marred by the kind of pseudo-history of science in the Middle Ages which, apparently, was a compulsion among science writers of the 20th century.

George Gamow's book "One Two Three. Infinity" is an good survey of the sciences. I bought this book after hearing Noam Chomsky speak highly of it while being interviewed. His chapters on space, the fourth dimension, and relativity dig a bit deeper than "Hawking's Brief History of Time.

Infinity, George Gamow is one of the founders of the Big Bang theory. San Francisco Chronice.

Read Gravity, by George Gamow online on Bookmate – Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions that exist in nature. Understanding gravity is not only essential for understanding the motion. Gravity is one of the four fundamental interactions that exist in nature. Understanding gravity is not only essential for understanding the motion of objects on Earth, but also the motion of all celestial objects, and even the expansion of the Universe itself.

A distinguished physicist and teacher, George Gamow also possessed a special gift for explaining the intricacies of science.

In the days when civilized men believed that the world was flat they had no reason to think about gravity. There was up and down. All material things tended naturally to move downward, or to fall, and no one thought to ask why. The notion of absolute up and down directions persisted into the Middle Ages, when it was still invoked to prove that the earth could not be round. The first ray of light to pierce the mist of scholastic ideas about falling bodies issued from the work of Galileo Galilei.

George Gamow's classic provides a delightf. Thirty Years that Shook Physics: The Story of Quantum Theory. Infinity: Facts and Speculations of Science.

George Gamow (March 4, 1904 – August 19, 1968), born Georgiy Antonovich Gamov, was a Soviet-American theoretical physicist and cosmologist. He was an early advocate and developer of Lemaître's Big Bang theory.

A distinguished physicist and teacher, George Gamow also possessed a special gift for making the intricacies of science accessible to a wide audience. In Gravity, he takes an enlightening look at three of the towering figures of science who unlocked many of the mysteries behind the laws of physics: Galileo, the first to take a close look at the process of free and restricted fall; Newton, originator of the concept of gravity as a universal force; and Einstein, who proposed that gravity is no more than the curvature of the four-dimensional space-time continuum.Graced with the author's own drawings, both technical and fanciful, this remarkably reader-friendly book focuses particularly on Newton, who developed the mathematical system known today as the differential and integral calculus. Readers averse to equations can skip the discussion of the elementary principles of calculus and still achieve a highly satisfactory grasp of a fascinating subject.Starting with a chapter on Galileo’s pioneering work, this volume devotes six chapters to Newton's ideas and other subsequent developments and one chapter to Einstein, with a concluding chapter on post-Einsteinian speculations concerning the relationship between gravity and other physical phenomena, such as electromagnetic fields.

User reviews
Drelajurus
I recently re-read this book, having read it for the first time many years ago. It is a very good summary of Galileo's and Newton's theory of gravitation, along with numerous examples such as the tides and planetary orbits. It also includes a basic introduction to calculus, without which it almost impossible to understand the physics. There is a nice chapter on general relativity, which gives a qualitative overview of the subject. Gamow's trademark humor enlivens the book quite a bit, as well as his illustrations.

On the minus side, the first chapter is marred by the kind of pseudo-history of science in the Middle Ages which, apparently, was a compulsion among science writers of the 20th century. He falsely implies that the medievals thought the Earth was flat, when it fact, they knew it was round and had a fair idea of its size. In Dante's Divine Comedy, Dante and Virgil travel through Hell down to the center of the Earth, which Dante clearly depicts as the center of gravitation, and then climb upwards until they reach the surface. The rotundity of the earth was known to the ancients, and the knowledge was never lost, although you could always find a few cranks who thought it was flat. There still are some!

Gamow is also a bit too confident that Einstein's theory was firmly established at the time he was writing. In the 1950s, the proofs were rather thin - the bending of starlight by the Sun, the perihelion precession of Mercury, and the slight redshift of solar spectral lines. It is only in the last 15 years or so that we have been able to carry out precise, satellite-based measurements which do, indeed, confirm the theory. He mentions in passing a satellite experiment proposed by S F Singer in the early 1950s. That experiment has since been carried out, with positive results. Prof Singer is still around and is a frequently quoted critic of global warming claims.

Gamow was perhaps, the best popularizer of science who ever put pen to paper. He was that rarity - a practicing scientist with a real gift for language and illustration. His books are somewhat dated now, but still very worth reading.
Andromakus
George Gamow was a world-class theoretical physicist (nuclear decay, big-bang). Later in life he explored areas outside his primary field, and managed significant contribution to the understanding DNA. In addition to being a world class scientist, he had a special talent for popularizing science ... a talent perhaps equaled only by the late Richard Feynman. He was also something of an artist, with a curious, cartoonish, whimsical style. (Why does the angel on page 23 have three pairs of wings?)
His most famous book for the layman is "One, two, three ... infinity." The present book, "Gravity," is in much the same vein, but it struck me as being not quite as good as the former. (Perhaps this is partly because I was in my early teens when I read "Infinity" ... and so was very impressionable.)
The book deals with the development of human understanding of gravity. Beginning with the prehistoric notion of up and down, it goes on to describe the revelations of Galileo, Newton and Einstein. The last chapter deals with cosmology ... including some fascinating conjectures of Dirac.
The book contains some gaps, and at least one mistake:
On page 142 appears the number 1E-12 ("ten to the minus twelve"). Gamow goes on to state that this is "a millionth of a billionth" ... it should read "a millionth of a millionth."
On page 65 appears a definite integral accompanied by the words "in the notations of the previous chapter." But the previous chapter does not give even a single example of a definite integral ... demanding quite a leap in understanding. (I know this from personal experience: when I was trying to teach myself calculus in high school, I had a big stumbling block with the notation of definite integrals.)
The diagram on page 111 is a little misleading in that it seems to suggest that all the gasses from the exploding nuclear device ("B1") are directed upwards, so as to hit the deflector plate. Of course this cannot be, and most of the gasses go in other directions ... nevertheless a great and informative diagram.
A curiosity I learned from this book: Gamow tells us that Newton used a "prime" (`) to indicate taking the anti-derivative (thereby undoing the "dot"). It is curious that in modern notation the prime has come to symbolize differentiation (essentially the same as the dot), and not integration.
All in all, another great book from Gamow ... and at a very reasonable price.
Ydely
This is my second book by Ted's Gerritsen and I must say it is significantly better than the first. At times it was a don't put it down page turner and at others a provocative insight into the military and space agencies says of business and a more powerful what if scenario of world shattering possibilities. Don't confuse this book with a Clooney movie. This one is much more possible and infinitely more fearful.
Puchock
Look around, there is an invisible force holding stuff close to this big planet; like a giant magnet that attracts every single atom in the vicinity. Amusingly, this fantastic phenomenon is holding together the whole universe. Damn, Gamow did a great job explaining why Newton even invented Calculus to understand it. Then Einstein joined the talk saying that it can even bend light! If you don't believe it, Gamow does some calculations to entertain you. Have fun.
RUsich155
I have never read a book like this. Space travel has never really interested me. This is different and terrifying. It really could happen. Once I started reading, I had to finish it. Up most of the night but well worth it. I can sleep later????
Nalaylewe
I loved this book! The first great thing about this book is it has “NO ZOMBIES.” YAY! Furthermore, it gets your attention from the beginning and is an exciting and engrossing read. It’s an excellent book and well-written and if poor spelling and grammar distracts you, you’ll enjoy this book because if there are any errors, they are few, providing a smooth reading experience. Great book!