» » The Life of Sir William Osler: 2 Volumes

Free eBook The Life of Sir William Osler: 2 Volumes download

by Harvey Cushing

Free eBook The Life of Sir William Osler: 2 Volumes download ISBN: 0195005244
Author: Harvey Cushing
Publisher: Oxford University Press (December 31, 1956)
Language: English
Pages: 1436
Category: Biography and Memoir
Size MP3: 1469 mb
Size FLAC: 1243 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: docx txt lrf rtf


This is a two volume set of The Life of Sir William. It comes with a sturdy cardboard case. A physician who loved the history of medicine, my father gave me the two volumes when I was a pre-med at Berkeley in 1952

This is a two volume set of The Life of Sir William. A physician who loved the history of medicine, my father gave me the two volumes when I was a pre-med at Berkeley in 1952 It's a readable, about a physician whose humanity matched his scientific acumen, thus setting an example for medicine as a profession.

Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. author: Harvey Cushing d. ate. te: 2007-03-25 d. citation: 1925 d. dentifier. origpath: d/0106/959 d. copyno: 1 d.

Cushing was also awarded the 1926 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography for a book recounting the life of one of the fathers of modern medicine, Sir William Osler. The Life of Sir William Osler. In 1930, Cushing was awarded the Lister Medal for his contributions to surgical science. As part of the award, he delivered the Lister Memorial Lecture at the Royal College of Surgeons of England in July 1930. Cushing was elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1934, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of London. He served as president of the History of Science Society in 1934.

Harvey Williams Cushing (April 8, 1869 – October 7, 1939) was an American neurosurgeon. Cushing was also awarded the 1926 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography for a book recounting the life of one of the fathers of modern medicine, Sir William Osler. A pioneer of brain surgery, he was the first person to describe Cushing's syndrome. He is often called the "father of modern neurosurgery.

Sir William Osler, 1st Baronet, FRS FRCP (/ˈɒzlər/; July 12, 1849 – December 29, 1919) was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital. Osler created the first residency program for specialty training of physicians, and he was the first to bring medical students out of the lecture hall for bedside clinical training. He has frequently been described as the Father of Modern Medicine and one of the "greatest diagnosticians ever to wield a stethoscope"

by Harvey Williams Cushing.

by Harvey Williams Cushing. ISBN13: 9780195005240.

Very good+ in navy blue cloth with gilt spines. Published by Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1925, 1925. Ends of spines and corners only slightly rubbed; endpapers and edges with very light foxing. From Johanson Rare Books ABAA (Baltimore, MD, . Association Member: ABAA. Price: US$ 10. 0 Convert Currency.

Volume 8, Number 2 May, 1926. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why?

Volume 8, Number 2 May, 1926. Member subscriptions. Recommend to your library. Purchase back issues. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why? Which Ones? How? Zhang. Science and Orthodox Christianity: An Overview. Nicolaidis et al. Ten Problems in History and Philosophy of Science.

Harvey Cushing (1869-1939), a former student and close friend of Osler’s and a pioneer of neurosurgery, has himself . William Osler (1849-1919) is widely regarded as one of the most influential physicians of the late 19th and early 20th century and a key figure in the history of medicine.

Harvey Cushing (1869-1939), a former student and close friend of Osler’s and a pioneer of neurosurgery, has himself become an icon of modern medicine. He was one of the first physicians to use X-rays for diagnosing brain tumours and he developed revolutionary methods of blood pressure measurement. He also discovered Cushing’s syndrome, the first autoimmune disease identified in a human being. This monumental biography earned him the Pulitzer Prize in 1926.

This is a two volume set of The Life of Sir William. It comes with a sturdy cardboard case.
User reviews
Rrd
These two volumes arrived on time in the condition stated and I thoroughly enjoyed reading them. It gave a wonderful look into a great man's life. I enjoyed it immensely.
Hanelynai
The two volumes arrived in the advertized condition. Interestingly, there is evidence that the volumes formerly resided in a Harvard library, appropriate for their author, Dr. Harvey Cushing. Not a light read...
kolos
A physician who loved the history of medicine, my father gave me the two volumes when I was a pre-med at Berkeley in 1952. Just as Osler read 10 pages a night before going to sleep, I did the same, so finished biography in a few months, with great respect for the writer as well as the subject.. It's a readable, about a physician whose humanity matched his scientific acumen, thus setting an example for medicine as a profession. He emphasized, actually pioneered, in bedside teaching where the doctor-patient relationship is as important as the textbooks. It won the Pulitzer for biography in 1926.
Today the US medical profession is heavy on technology and weak on the healing relationship. We have 3 specialists for every generalist--the opposite of countries like the Netherlands where costs are much lower and health is much better.
Datrim
Dr. Harvey Cushing wrote this book about his mentor, the Canadian physician Dr. William Osler. Once one gets past his breathless, fawning, hyperbolic style, the facts emerge: Osler was a maniac for human dissection. Any time of day or night, once someone expired they were thrown on the dissecting table and he put on a show for his many worshipful acolytes. No doubt, the human anatomy can only be studied by dissection...but did he have to relish it? I was interested in reading this book because of a quote excerpted from it in the 1960's Time/Life series, The Physician. Unfortunately the author of that book chose to do a "...." quotation that made Osler look like he cared for a patient, an indigent black man who had a fatal disease. Reading the entire text, it is clear that he only wanted to cut him up after the fact for his own morbid curiosity. A great example of how quotations can be misrepresented. In short, the book was overly long but illuminating. Cushing did not seem to use good sense in his portrait of the man, but perhaps his view of him as untouchable and unquestionable led to his many lapses of judgement in sharing so many strange stories. The only triumph is that Osler never had a disease named after him, no doubt a slice of immortality that he craved. He has a sad substitute, the minor "Osler's Sign". If you liked this book, you might enjoy "Sweeney Todd"