Free eBook Queen Camilla download

by Sue Townsend

Free eBook Queen Camilla download ISBN: 0141024453
Author: Sue Townsend
Publisher: Penguin UK (October 30, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 464
Category: Biography and Memoir
Size MP3: 1942 mb
Size FLAC: 1328 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lrf doc lrf mobi


Sue Townsend is one of Britain’s bestselling authors. Her hugely successful novels include seven Adrian Mole books, The Queen & I and Number Ten. She is also a well-known playwright.

Sue Townsend is one of Britain’s bestselling authors. She lives in Leicester. The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾. The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Queen Camilla is the brilliantly funny sequel to The Queen and I by Sue Townsend. What if being Royal was a crime?

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. What if being Royal was a crime? The UK has come over all republican. The Royal Family exiled to an Exclusion Zone with the other villains and spongers.

The book is impeccably well-written and divinely funny. We learn about all the quirks of the Royal Family; the Queen is in the forefront, as in the previous book. The book is exquisitely readable and I can highly recommend it.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed. The book is impeccably well-written and divinely funny.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Queen and I by. Sue Townsend.

Queen Camilla is a novel by the British author Sue Townsend. It was published in the UK on 26 October 2006 by Penguin Books and is a sequel to her novel The Queen and I. Most of the Hell Close neighbours from the earlier novel are also in the subsequent book. It follows the Queen, the Prince of Wales and his new wife, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, who, at the start of the novel, have been living for the last 13 years on the Flowers Estate, now called the Flowers Exclusion Zone or 'The Fez'

In Sue Townsend's Queen Camilla, it's the royals, not the talking canines, who are completely barking, says Alex Clark.

In Sue Townsend's Queen Camilla, it's the royals, not the talking canines, who are completely barking, says Alex Clark. If you don't think so and have little confidence that your prejudice can be changed, then Sue Townsend's latest novel, a follow-up to 1992's The Queen and I, is probably not for you.

They rarely talked about their mother, both of them were aware of the pain her absence caused the other. Harry said, ‘Mum would have been a well top Queen. Will residents please return to their homes and stay there. William and Harry quickened.

Get the App. Company.

Penguin UK, 6 сент Читать весь отзыв Читать весь отзыв.

Yet Prince Charles is more interested in root vegetables than reigning. unless his wife Camilla can be Queen in a newly restored monarchy. But when a scoundrel who claims to be the couple's secret love-child offers to take the crown off their hands, the stage is set for a right Royal show down. And the question for Camilla (and rest of the country) will be: Queen of the vegetable patch or Queen of England? 'Brilliantly satirical' Evening Standard. One of our finest living comic writers' The Times.

Queen Camilla is the brilliantly funny sequel to The Queen and I by Sue Townsend. What if being Royal was a crime? The UK has come over all republican. The Royal Family exiled to an Exclusion Zone with the other villains and spongers. And to cap it all, the Queen has threatened to abdicate. Yet Prince Charles is more interested in root vegetables than reigning ... unless his wife Camilla can be Queen in a newly restored monarchy. But when a scoundrel who claims to be the couple's secret lovechild offers to take the crown off their hands, the stage is set for a right Royal show down. And the question for Camilla (and rest of the country) will be: Queen of the vegetable patch or Queen of England? Bestselling author Sue Townsend has been Britain's favourite comic writer for over three decades. 'Brilliantly satirical' Evening Standard 'One of our finest living comic writers' The Times 'Brilliantly funny' Closer 'Another fantastic read from Townsend' OK! Sue Townsend is Britain's favourite comic author. Her hugely successful novels include eight Adrian Mole books, The Public Confessions of a Middle-Aged Woman (Aged 55¾), Number Ten, Ghost Children, The Queen and I, Queen Camilla and The Woman Who Went to Bed For a Year, all of which are highly acclaimed bestsellers. She has also written numerous well-received plays. She lives in Leicester, where she was born and grew up.
User reviews
Hatе&love
Great book, I really enjoyed it, as well as the other Sue Townsend's books. Arrived in very good condition.
Sharpmane
Haven't finished it yet
Shomeshet
Sue Townsend is a truly inventive writer. Both "Queen Camilla" and its predecessor, "The Queen and I", are hilarious stories. However, like so many English (and American) people, she just doesn't seem to understand the difference between England and the United Kingdom. (Disclaimer: I am Welsh.)
Stoneshaper
In a fictionalised version of contemporary Britain, Townsend gets us up to date with the current status of the Windsor family now in their thirteenth year on Hellborne 'Hell' Close. The Queen wants to abdicate, Charles potters away in his prized vegetable patch while Camilla who gave up her life of privilege settles down to life on the close. Teen mothers and armies of disgruntled dogs roam the streets in this very funny imagined version of modern day Britain.
Qusserel
Not a well written as her previous title, "The Queen and I" Some of the characters that were in the first book did not match to their counterparts in this one. Disappointing.
snowball
As funny as only Sue Townsend can write.
After reading The Queen and I, this story was familiar.
Nten
This is a continuation of Sue Townsend’s previous book about the Royal Family, “The Queen and I”. Now I haven’t personally any knowledge of Camilla’s personality since I don’t live in Britain and do not continually see her on TV; but since I note and admire the author’s amazing grasp of the personalities of the other Royals, I trust that her depiction of Camilla is equally accurate.

Britain has turned into a totalitarian 1984-like society with Jack Barker as Prime Minister. Council estates have been converted into Exclusion Zones “where the criminal, the antisocial, the inadequate, the feckless, the agitators, the disgraced professionals, the stupid, the drug-addicted and the morbidly obese” live. The Royal Family, those who have not fled abroad, are living in the Flowers Exclusion Zone (I don’t know which category of the above-stated unfortunates they fall into.)

Prince Charles regularly wins the Best Kept Garden Award, whereas his neighbours’ garden is “an eyesore of old mattresses --- and festering rubbish bags”.

The residents of the Exclusion Zone are required to wear an ankle tag and carry an identity card at all times. Their movements are monitored by the security police on CCTV screens. Difficulties occur for the Queen when she forgets to take her identity card with her, though, of course, everyone knows who she is.

“When Camilla’s tag had been fitted --- she had said, with her usual cheerful pragmatism ‘I think it flatters my ankle beautifully.’ By contrast, Princess Anne had wrestled two security police to the floor before a third officer had finally managed to attach her tag.”

Jack Barker laughed when his government was accused of being totalitarian. He wasn’t a Stalin or a Mao; it wasn’t his fault there were no viable opposition parties.

Now I haven’t read “1984” recently, but the society Sue Townsend here depicts seems to be just as Orwell predicted. With a mere click on a switch Inspector Lancer has access to full, detailed information about a specific citizen.

For example:
“Bronchitis every winter, otherwise healthy. Menstrual cycle: first week of every month, complains of severe pain. History: Unsettled at nursery school, constantly cries for mother, At four years --- vocabulary v. poor, when shown a picture of a cow could not name it.”

The book is filled with dogs and these communicate avidly with each other and their owners; the author provides us with an interpretation of their various utterances.

“(Camilla to Charles)
‘Darling, do you think a dog knows it’s a dog?’ asked Camilla.
‘It depends what you mean by know’, said Charles.
Freddie (one of Camilla’s dogs) snapped, ‘Of course I know I’m a bloody dog. I eat from a bowl on the floor. I ----- in the street ---.’” (Amazon did not like the word the author chose here.)

It looks now (with the way things are going in 2017) as though Sue Townsend also had prophetic gifts. Australia is now to be the first country in the world to introduce compulsory tagging of all persons so authorities will be able continually to keep checks on the activities of each individual.

Jack Barker makes it illegal to have more than one dog per household, so the rest must be disposed of. The Royals all have several dogs so this affects them greatly. And the vociferous dogs themselves also have something to say about the matter.

The leader of the Conservative party Boy English, wants to restore the monarchy and thus set Queen Elizabeth back on the throne: she, however, has plans to abdicate. It turns out that Charles and Camilla have an illegitimate son, Graham, a rather unsympathetic person, born years ago; he is now second in line to the throne.

The book is impeccably well-written and divinely funny. We learn about all the quirks of the Royal Family; the Queen is in the forefront, as in the previous book. The book is exquisitely readable and I can highly recommend it.
I'm giving this tale five stars because I don't think anyone could have written it any better, but every time I read one of Sue Townsend's books I find myself saddened by the society she is reflecting. So while there are many comic and satirically amusing moments, I also find it tragic.

For instance, the Royal Family has been locked in a low-end-of-society Exclusion zone run as a private enterprise, for thirteen years. And during that time Prince Philip has had a stroke and now lies in a care home almost forgotten. The Queen goes to visit daily but the nurses are absent, not paid well enough to risk their backs lifting him to change the sheets, or too rushed and understaffed. So when the Queen and her family are confined to house arrest, Philip ends up with no care apart from a man in a wheelchair who can't get near enough to the bed to give him food. This isn't funny, it's a look at what is happening in some care home somewhere today.

You don't need to have read the previous book in which the royalty was dethroned, but it does come as something of a shock if you haven't, to see that William is cheerfully working on scaffolding and Harry is hanging out with hoodies and Anne has married someone with no breeding but a chin, while Charles and Camilla keep each other happy and grow turnips and talk to the dogs. A health and safety officer called Graham claims to be the product of a young love affair between Charles and Camilla, and the rules on succession having changed, he would now stand ahead of William in line to inherit, if there was a crown to inherit that is.

There is a Big Brother style surveillance situation and an all-pervasive computer called Vulcan which knows what you bought last and what music you like, but occasionally puts two million pounds in someone's bank account by mistake or sends death certs to all the pensioners. The Prime Minister decides to ban stepladders and dogs, which gets all the dogs, which we see talking to one another, very worried indeed.

As I say there is a lot that's funny, and I'm delighted that Townsend is able to write in this fashion without being jailed as in some other countries, but there is also a lot in this book that is very sad indeed.