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Free eBook CHILDREN OF ENGLAND: HEIRS OF KING HENRY VIII download

by Alison Weir

Free eBook CHILDREN OF ENGLAND: HEIRS OF KING HENRY VIII download ISBN: 0224038338
Author: Alison Weir
Publisher: Jonathan Cape; First Edition edition (1996)
Language: English
Pages: 400
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People
Size MP3: 1129 mb
Size FLAC: 1678 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: azw lit rtf lrf


Henry VIII of England had several children

Henry VIII of England had several children. The best known children are the three legitimate offspring who survived infancy and would succeed him as monarchs of England successively, Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I. His first two wives, Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn, had several pregnancies that ended in stillbirth, miscarriage, or death in infancy.

Home Alison Weir Six Wives of Henry VIII. 12 April - Anne Boleyn first appears in public as Queen of England. c. July - Birth of a child, sex not known, either stillborn or dead soon after birth, to Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. 23 May - Archbishop Cranmer declares the marriage of Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon to be invalid and unlawful. 28 May - Archbishop Cranmer declares the marriage of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn to be good and valid. 22 June - Execution of John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester.

When Henry VIII died in 1547, he left three highly intelligent children to succeed him .

When Henry VIII died in 1547, he left three highly intelligent children to succeed him in turn, to be followed, if their lines failed, by the descendants of his sister, Mary Tudor. Children of England begins at the point where Alison Wier's bestseller, The Six Wives of Henry VIII came to an end, and covers the period until Elizabeth succeeded to the throne in 1558. Her interest is in the characters and relationships with Henry's four heirs.

Children of England book. Her interest is i/ Children When Henry VIII died in 1547, he left three highly intelligent children to succeed him in turn, to be followed, if their lines failed, by the descendants of his sister, Mary Tudor.

With impressive narrative skill, Alison Weir pilots her readers through the ceaseless tides of intrigue which surged around the four heirs of King Henry VIII. Another fascinating book by Alison Weir. This is full-blooded history" (Christopher Hirst Independent). She writes in an engaging way and adopts an even-handed approach" (Irish Times). I enjoyed this immensely, learning more about the infamous Tudour Siblings.

In "Children of england", alison weir s interest is not in constitional history but in. .Alison Weir lives and works in Surrey

In "Children of england", alison weir s interest is not in constitional history but in the characters and relationships of henry s four heirs. Alison Weir lives and works in Surrey. Her books include several works of non-fiction - Britains Royal Families, The Six Wives of Henry VIII, Children of England, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Henry VIII: King and Court, Mary, Queen of Scots and Isabella: She-Wolf of France, as well as four novels - Innocent Traitor, The Captive Queen, The Lady Elizabeth and A Dangerous Inheritance.

Children of England: The Heirs of King Henry VIII/The Children of Henry VIII (1996). Lancaster and York: The Wars of the Roses/(. The Wars of the Roses (1995). The Princes in the Tower (1992), republished as Richard III and the Princes in the Tower (2014). The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1991). Britain's Royal Families (1989). Obviously, my publishers are not in favour of this, as they want my full-price books to show up first.

Children of England: The Heirs of King Henry VIII (1996, later reissued as The Children of Henry VIII).

Just better Her first published work, 1989's Britain's Royal Families, was a genealogical overview of the British royal family. She subsequently wrote biographies of Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France, Katherine Swynford, and the Princes in the Tower. Children of England: The Heirs of King Henry VIII (1996, later reissued as The Children of Henry VIII). Elizabeth the Queen (1998) (published in America as The Life of Elizabeth I).

User reviews
Wal
A wonderfully written book about the Tudors and Henry VIII's children by Ann Bolyn and Katherine of Aragon and Katharine Howard. All the intrigue and plotting by those around the king and then after his death the various factions who tried to support their choice for monarch - all within a drama concerning whether the national religion should be Catholic or the Reformed English church. This author is an excellent writer and I want to read her other books about Elizabeth and the other Tudors.
Winotterin
As a Tudorphile, I greatly enjoyed this book, finding it informative, readable, and well-researched, judging from the use of primary sources. Much attention gets focused on Henry VIII, his wives, and Elizabeth in her later years, so it was refreshing to read about Edward, Mary, and the young Elizabeth. Ms. Weir provides enough detail to give readers an understanding of who the Tudors were as people, although with Edward, the focus shifts so much toward the activities of his uncles as to eclipse Edward himself.

The title is a little misleading, discussing far more than the individual children and their reigns. The book is really a detailed account of events in England from the time of Henry's death to the accession of Elizabeth, including the issues and people that shaped those years. Lady Jane Grey was not a child of Henry VIII, but she was a pawn in the political maneuverings of the time, so her background and brief time as queen are presented in meticulous fashion. Disappointingly, Elizabeth is not covered beyond the death of Mary. The author seems to have saved any further discussion of her character and reign for the next book, which deprives the current volume of a sense of completeness. Ms. Weir easily could have included a chapter summarizing Elizabeth's 45 years on the throne.

Still, the book made for enjoyable and informative reading about the less popular Tudors.
Global Progression
Alison Weir is known for her ability in bringing the Tudors to life while using historical research in such away that brings the entire family to life. I highly recommend this book!

Great research is the hallmark of the author's books, and this compendium of their lives is no exception. Interweaving the relationships and lives of his three children and his great niece, Lady Jane Grey, she brings these people to life.

I was particularly fascinated to read about Edward's life. I'd never known much about him and always imagined he was just some lad convinced to do things by his advisors, but historically this doesn't seem to be the case. Despite his short life, he was seen by those around him as not only a staunch supporter of the Protestant cause, but almost rigidly and implacably severe, even cruel, in his treatment of everyone, even his own sisters, making Elizabeth kneel in front of him if she wished to speak with him. He had a sadistic streak shown clearly in his short life, and he may have been incredibly ruthless and cruel if he'd lived, making his father seem tame in comparison. He had no compunction about signing death warrants, even for his uncle Seymour, but did love his stepmother Catherine Parr, and sister Mary despite her love of dancing! He scorned allying himself with his cousin Jane Grey although in fierce Protestantism, they were well matched

Lady Jane Grey, the Tudor cousin of the three siblings is always a mysterious figure, but if truth were told, she was a tragic figure -- a Protestant puppet who was beaten into submission by her fiercely ambitious mother and forced to become queen, forced into an unwelcome marriage with a foolish and cowardly boy, and then because of the stupidity of her father and their allies, who tried to force a rebellion against Mary (who would've been content to just keep Jane in the Tower), she lost her head. This left Mary clearly the heir.

We all know about the attacks on Protestants by Queen Mary (including burning my ancestress at the stake for her beliefs!), Ms Weir shows us how Mary Tudor's alliances were twisted by the men who helped her rule, including her very nasty Spanish husband who even wanted to bring the Inquisition to the UK. Mary suffered from very ill health, migraines, problems with her periods, and a very real paranoia brought on by her terrible childhood at the hands of her father through Ann Boleyn's influence.

Almost toothless at age 38, wracked by jealousy of Elizabeth, and already in the last stages of menopause at her marriage aged 38, she was unable to bear children, leading to a pseudo pregnancy and psychological problems. If her father had allowed her to be married at an early age, the purge of Protestant would never have happened, but unfortunately this was not to be. And yet, all of Elizabeth's travails and even persecution, at the hands of her father Henry VIII, the court, Edward, Jane, and Mary, only led her to become one of the most famous and powerful leaders in the history of the world.

If the book suffers any fault, it is that enough is not said in the end about the always fascinating Elizabeth. However, this book is more about the interactions of this fascinating and ruthless family, and Elizabeth will always deserve a book of her own!