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by Christopher de Bellaigue

Free eBook In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran download ISBN: 0066209803
Author: Christopher de Bellaigue
Publisher: Harper; First Edition edition (January 4, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Historical
Size MP3: 1493 mb
Size FLAC: 1237 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: rtf mobi azw lrf


His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs, was short-listed for the Royal Society . I don't believe that too many others will.

His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs, was short-listed for the Royal Society of Literature's Ondaatje Prize, and his second, Rebel Land, was short-listed for the 2010 Orwell Prize. He and his wife divide their time between London and Tehran. The overall picture of Iran, wittingly or not, portrayed by de Bellaigue is vastly unfavorable to the Iran the wine drinking, poetry reading, picnicking, and sufi mystical Iran/ancient Persia many of us know.

In this book, Christopher de Bellaigue gives us the voices and memories of these wistful revolutionaries. Mullahs and academics, artists, traders and mystics - the author knows them as an insider, a journalist who speaks fluent Persian and is married to an Iranian, and also as an outsider, a Westerner isolated in one of the world's most enigmatic and impenetrable societies. Includes bibliographical references.

De Bellaigue, Christopher, 1971-. Economic history, Politics and government, Social conditions. New York : Harper Perennial. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on July 18, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Christopher de Bellaigue (born 1971 in London) is a journalist who has worked on the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His work mostly chronicles developments in Iran and Turkey. De Bellaigue, who attended Eton College, is from an Anglo-French background. He obtained a BA and MA in Oriental Studies from the University of Cambridge, where he was a student at Fitzwilliam College.

Christopher de Bellaigue, a Western journalist married to an Iranian woman and a longtime resident of a. .Its organizing logic is non-linear, opaque, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs is not an introductory book about modern Iran.

Christopher de Bellaigue, a Western journalist married to an Iranian woman and a longtime resident of a prosperous suburb of Tehran, offers a stunning insider's view of a culture hitherto hidden from American eyes, and reveals the true hearts and minds of an extraordinary people. Christopher de Bellaigue-British journalist, longtime resident of Tehran, husband to an Iranian woman-plunges into his narrative without much context or signposts.

This book, set in the Islamic Republic of Iran, should be required reading for anyone hoping to understand the complexities of current events there

This book, set in the Islamic Republic of Iran, should be required reading for anyone hoping to understand the complexities of current events there. The fall of the Shah, Khomeini's rise to power, and the shifting alliances after his death resolve into a new kind of monarchy that, in the opinion of de Bellaigue and those he interviews, has betrayed the Revolution

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs : A.Publisher: Harper ISBN 13: 9780066209807. Books will be free of page markings. Will be clean, not soiled or stained.

Publisher: Harper ISBN 13: 9780066209807.

by Christopher de Bellaigue. Few historians and journalists writing in English have been able to meaningfully examine post-revolutionary Iranian life. Years after his death, the shadow of Ayatollah Khomeini still looms over Shi'ite Islam and Iranian politics, the state of the nation fought over by conservatives and radicals.

Find this Pin and more on Books - Iran by usever. What others are saying

Find this Pin and more on Books - Iran by usever. What others are saying. uk: Christopher de Bellaigue: 9780007113941: Books.

Beside the highway that leads south from Tehran, the necropolis of Ayatollah Rudollah Khomeini rises from the sweating tarmac like a miraculous filling station supplying fuel for the soul. However, the paint is peeling even before the complex has been completed, and the prayer halls are all but deserted.

Iran's Islamic Revolution is out of gas, but what has happened to the hostage takers, suicidal holy warriors, and ideologues who brought it about? These men and women kicked out the Shah, spent eight years fighting Saddam's Iraq, and terrified the West with its militancy and courage. Now they are a worn-out generation.

In this superbly crafted and thoughtful book, Christopher de Bellaigue gives us the voices and memories of these wistful revolutionaries. Mullahs and academics, artists, traders, and mystics: the author knows them as an insider -- a journalist who speaks fluent Persian and is married to an Iranian -- and also as an outsider -- a Westerner isolated in one of the world's most enigmatic and impenetrable societies.

The result is a subtly intense revelation of the hearts and minds of the Iranian people -- and what it is to live among them.

User reviews
Felhann
Christoper de Bellaigue [pronounced "deh bellog"] has written a wrenching account of contemporary Iran (2000 to 2002) in considerable detail. As a British journalist, he had visited Tehran several times prior and after the period he focuses on with the aim of understanding the Iranian political culture and its leaders' fascination with martyrdom particularly during the post-Khomeini 1998 era and the disastrous Iraq and Iran - more than 2 million Iranian casualties. What follows is a much detailed account from one Iranian veteran or family after another carefully interviewed and documentated by de Bellaigue who is fluent in modern Persian and at home in Iran with his Iranian wife and in-laws in Tehran. De Bellaigue follows up lead after lead of Iran's veterans in the capitol and provinces including the province of Khuzistan where much of the early war was fought by the Iran against the invading forces of Saddam Hussein from lower Iraq amidst Iran-Iraqi oil fields. De Bellaique even visits some of the bloodiest battlefields, villages and towns, such as Khorramshahr (Date-Town) whose name was changed to "Khooneenshahr (Bloody Town) due to the vast devastation of people and buildings. The narrative is unrelenting in dissecting the eight-year war including the 1983 peace offering from Saddam Hussein which Ayatollah Khomeini turned down thus extending the massive blood-letting of Iran's eligible male population including 10-14 year old youth called the "basij" force.De Bellaique also interviewed the fallen veterans' families in villages and towns giving the heaviest detail to the agonies and rationales for such bloody history so very new to Iranians whose last comparable conflict in longevity and fatalities can only be found in the twelve-year Ottoman-Iranian war along the Turkish/Iraqi borders with Iran in the last parts of the 16th century (AD 1578-1590), a cluster of wars by Iran's mid-16th-17th cc. Safavid shahs in the Caucasus, and in the dynasty-killing Afghani Occupation of Iran in the early 18th c. (1722-25) - In other words, most horror display of misguided nationalist outburst for 20th century Iran. The thousands of black wreaths that decorated the doors of fallen veterans' homes remain a rivetting and most unpopular collective memory of the present Islamic Republic of Iran. Iranian academic specialists, graduate students in international relations or conflict resolution, Iranians themselves, and war reporters will most enjoy the gruesome realities suffered by the Iranians at home and in diaspora. I don't believe that too many others will. The overall picture of Iran, wittingly or not, portrayed by de Bellaigue is vastly unfavorable to the Iran the wine drinking, poetry reading, picnicking, and sufi mystical Iran/ancient Persia many of us know.
Teonyo
Like David Remnick's "Lenon's Tomb" and its treatment of the dissolution of the USSR, "Garden of the Martyrs" explores the issues, lifestyles, culture and history of the Iranian nation through intimate portraits of individuals living it. Focuses mainly on the years since the Revolution, with some particularly engaging and intriguing insight into the Iran-Iraq war. But also gives the novice an historical outline/framework for understanding the Prophet Muhammad and the evolution of a nation that has been invaded and occupied by countless powers/armies over the centuries and that is still a complex work in progress.
Kelerius
Painful to read. Unfortunately the author has a confused, non-sequitur mind: "He never made the pilgrimage to Mecca for that would have implied a repentance he couldn't entertain." ..."He was handsome—not tall. but slim, with delicate features and a cleanliness beyond hygiene. (I'd been sensitized to such things; my enquiries into the War had brought me into contact with many people who were dirtied, and I longed for a spotless soul"... "I go to Mr Soroush who looks sixty five but has youthful eyes"..."Mullahs study so they use their knowledge of God's Will, and their God given rationalism to,extract the law. They have tools: their knowledge of Arabic, grammar, rhetoric and logic. These help them when it comes to learning a set of principles for deriving the law from its sources. The art of derivation is called jurisprudence."..[Mullahs go to school to make money, something which has not occurred to the author]."Some mullahs aren't interested in the people or their questions; they rarely step out of the seminary. Some want to teach. Others want a quiet life, without stress and bother. If they marry, their cells may be passed on to a son, with familiar smells and unwashed tea things. The Shi'a Imamate, remember is a holy family, founded by the Prophet; Iranians have an innate respect for the hereditary principle."...It's acceptable for mojtaheds to reach different conclusions, as slong as they reach them using universally accepted methods." [What he is talking about is that two Mojtaheds may say completely opposite things, and Shi`ism says both are right, because they are Mojtaheds.]... "They loathed Fath-Ali's son, Muhammad who reigned for fourteen years until 1848, because he patronized Sufis"..
Maybe if the author had a Seeing-Eye dog he could at least write at the dog's level.