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Free eBook Dog Man: An Uncommon Life on a Faraway Mountain download

by Laural Merlington,Martha Sherrill

Free eBook Dog Man: An Uncommon Life on a Faraway Mountain download ISBN: 1400137268
Author: Laural Merlington,Martha Sherrill
Publisher: Tantor Audio; Unabridged edition (June 2, 2008)
Language: English
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Historical
Size MP3: 1155 mb
Size FLAC: 1984 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: mbr azw rtf lrf


As Dog Man opens, Martha Sherrill brings us to a world that Americans . Devoted to the dogs, Morie is forever changed.

As Dog Man opens, Martha Sherrill brings us to a world that Americans know very little about-the snow country of Japan during World War II. In a mountain . In a mountain village, we meet Morie Sawataishi, a fierce individualist who has chosen to break the law by keeping an Akita dog hidden in a shed on his property. During the war, the magnificent and intensely loyal Japanese hunting dogs are donated to help the war effort, eaten, or used to make fur vests for the military. His life becomes radically t preposterous-in ultra-ambitious, conformist Japan.

Dog Man: An Uncommon Life on a Faraway Mountain . Written by Martha Sherrill. As Dog Man opens, Martha Sherrill brings us to a world that Americans know very little about-the snow country of Japan during World War II. The subject of this nonfiction book, a man who lived in the snow country of northeast Japan for most of his life, was largely responsible for the revival of the Akita breed of dogs after World War II. It's a tale of stubborn obsession to the exclusion of his family or virtually any other interest.

As Dog Man opens, Martha Sherrill brings us to a world that Americans know very little about-the snow country of. . In a mountain village. It must be because of the common ancestry the Chows have with the Akita. This book surprised me and I read it in two nights. In a mountain village, we meet Morie Sawataishi, a fierce individualist who has chosen to break the law by keeping an Akita dog hidden in a shed on hi. By the time of the Japanese surrender in 1945, there are only sixteen Akitas left in the country.

Sherrill tells the story not only of the salvation of an ancient breed of dog but also of the complicated man who .

Sherrill tells the story not only of the salvation of an ancient breed of dog but also of the complicated man who loved them and of his Tokyo-born wife, who had to learn country ways and how to love dogs. Throughout the book, the changes in postwar Japan are woven into the narrative, along with tales of Morie’s Akitas.

Martha Sherrill; Laural Merlington. This book is much more than a typical dog breed book. This was a very interesting book. It is about Morie and the family and how Morie's love for his dogs shaped every element of family life. This is about a person who goes after his goal, and everybody else has to follow. It is about a man who is Japaneese and who lives from before WWII to present day. During WWII, a lot of the Akita dogs were being killed and they were going extinct, so this man brought home a puppy, which was illegal. After the war it turned out that there were only 16 Akita's in Japan and this is his and their story of servival.

by Martha Sherrill (Author), Laural Merlington (Narrator). This book was just so beautifully evocative and moving on so many levels

by Martha Sherrill (Author), Laural Merlington (Narrator). This book was just so beautifully evocative and moving on so many levels. At the heart of the story are the Akita dogs, brought back from the brink of extinction after WWII by a few dedicated breeders including Morie Sawataishi, the extraordinary engineer and dog lover, and his wife, Kitako, an equally compelling personality. The Akita dogs themselves, and in particular one very special dog called Three Good Lucks, are described with great reverence as a breed which, at its best, embodies loyalty, intelligence, fighting spirit, a calm sweetness, even wisdom.

As Dog Man opens, Martha Sherrill brings us to a world that Americans know very . In a mountain village, we meet Morie Sawataishi, a How one man's consuming passion for dogs saved a legendary breed from extinction and led him to a difficult, more soulful way of life in the wilds of Japan's remote snow country. It is about Morie and the family and how Morie’s love for his dogs shaped every element of family life.

DOG MAN An Uncommon Life on a Faraway Mountain. by Martha Sherrill Read by Laural Merlington. Merlington manages the Japanese names and phrases adeptly, allowing the listener to be immersed in this slice of life in a bygone era. The unlikely story of a Japanese man who becomes a champion of the Akita breed is brought to life through the fable-telling quality of Laural Merlington's narration. Merlington's reading makes the historical backdrop of WWII an engaging part of the plot, rather than mere pedantic detail.

Аудиокнига "Dog Man: An Uncommon Life on a Faraway Mountain", Martha Sherrill. Читает Laural Merlington. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

As Dog Man opens, Martha Sherrill brings us to a world that Americans know very little about-the snow country of Japan during World War II. In a mountain village, we meet Morie Sawataishi, a fierce individualist who has chosen to break the law by keeping an Akita dog hidden in a shed on his property.During the war, the magnificent and intensely loyal Japanese hunting dogs are donated to help the war effort, eaten, or used to make fur vests for the military. By the time of the Japanese surrender in 1945, there are only sixteen Akitas left in the country. The survival of the breed becomes Morie's passion and life, almost a spiritual calling.Devoted to the dogs, Morie is forever changed. His life becomes radically unconventional-almost preposterous-in ultra-ambitious, conformist Japan. For the dogs, Morie passes up promotions, bigger houses, and prestigious engineering jobs in Tokyo. Instead, he raises a family with his young wife, Kitako-a sheltered urban sophisticate-in Japan's remote and forbidding snow country.Their village is isolated, but interesting characters are always dropping by-dog buddies, in-laws from Tokyo, and a barefoot hunter who lives in the wild. Due in part to Morie's perseverance and passion, the Akita breed strengthens and becomes wildly popular, sometimes selling for millions of yen. Yet Morie won't sell his spectacular dogs. He only likes to give them away.Morie and Kitako remain in the snow country today, living in the traditional Japanese cottage they designed together more than thirty years ago-with tatami mats, an overhanging roof, a deep bathtub, and no central heat. At ninety-four years old, Morie still raises and trains the Akita dogs that have come to symbolize his life.In beautiful prose that is a joy to read, Sherrill opens up the world of the Dog Man and his wife, providing a profound look at what it is to be an individualist in a culture that reveres conformity-and what it means to live life in one's own way-while expertly revealing Japan and Japanese culture as we've never seen it before.
User reviews
Marr
If you love the Japanese Akita Inu - or any kind of dog - you will enjoy reading this true story. It is about the remarkable man and woman who, through the darkest days of WWII and the difficult years of rebuilding which followed, sacrificed city comforts and career... but managed to save a celebrated and unique breed. During the war years, especially, and despite the famous Hachikō story of pre-war years (look it up!), Akitas were being skinned for aviators' jackets and were generally considered an "antisocial" waste of food... in a society not accustomed to individualism or dissent. Under these horrible circumstances, Morie Sawataishi and his wife Kitako performed the ultimate rescue: They saved an entire line of splendid creatures, from a low point of only sixteen individuals. An inspirational story for sure.
Dagdalas
This book was just so beautifully evocative and moving on so many levels. At the heart of the story are the Akita dogs, brought back from the brink of extinction after WWII by a few dedicated breeders including Morie Sawataishi, the extraordinary engineer and dog lover, and his wife, Kitako, an equally compelling personality. The Akita dogs themselves, and in particular one very special dog called Three Good Lucks, are described with great reverence as a breed which, at its best, embodies loyalty, intelligence, fighting spirit, a calm sweetness, even wisdom. There are some heartbreaking events involving the dogs that had me sobbing for days, but it is worth the pain to get to know these magnificent animals. But the author explains that as Akitas are bred more for their looks than for personality traits, their vital essential character may be disappearing. So, too, is the quiet rural life of the snow country in Japan, which was frought with hardships but also poetic in its Spartan beauty. Morie sees these national treasures slipping away. Symbolically, he plants hundreds of cherry trees around the power plants he helps build as a sort of visual apology to the region, as well as doing what he can to preserve the integrity of the Akita breed. The book is also memorable for its description of a mountain man, or matagi, named Uesugi. Although I found his profession of killing bears for their gall bladders repellant, he is an absolutely fascinating character with an ancient, shaman-like wisdom. Finally, the story of Morie and Kitako, in many ways an incompatible couple with different values, who learned to love and respect each other through the course of a long and often difficult marriage, was inspiring. The book is written in a lyrical style which compliments the romance of the subject matter, although it can occasionally be distracting. But I can only thank the author for bringing this rarest and most beautiful of stories to a wider audience.
Jake
I own an Akita and this book brought so much new insight to the breeds history that I never knew. In addition, great lessons about marriage and being involved with your community; and just being true to your passions - this is a must read!
Skiletus
This book is a wonderful read.
I came across it while looking for books
on Hachiko.
I learned so much about raising a
Japanese Akita in their natural habitat.
Also about one families experiences during
WW2 and after.
It was also an eye opener of the trials of a
city women adapting to life in the remote
north.
Celace
Wow. I have recently adopted an Akita and wanted to acquaint myself with the breed. I bought a book written by an American breeder, but it was all about who won what show. This book is the history of the Akita. Specifically it targets the Akita breed post WWII. What a great story of an amazing breed of dog. The book is well written and informative. I highly recommend this book to anyone who owns or is curious about the Akita. Oh, and there are lots of pictures, too, of the old dogs.
Iesha
I own a Chow Chow and somehow, as I was looking for books on the breed this book came up on an Amazon search. It must be because of the common ancestry the Chows have with the Akita. This book surprised me and I read it in two nights. It is a reflection of post war (WWII) Japan and reveals the culture and struggles people went through during this period. It talks about Morie and how he loves the Akita and brings them back from the brink of extinction to a national treasure. The book looks at the interactions that Morie has with the family, dogs and the natural world around him. The book is full of heartbreak and happiness. Overall the book makes me want to find a cabin in the woods and grow a garden and live a simple happy life.
Faehn
Once I got into I loved this book. It gave me a very different perspective of what I have expected when I purchased this book. The dog man reminded me to someone who has a personality similar to one with Asperger syndrome - highly intelligent and hyperfocused in one area to the extend of neglecting everything else but I suppose his existential philosophy is also very much related to the Japanese culture and this dog man's unique coping style with the rapid development and paradigm shift in Japan's industrial development since it's capitulation in WWII. His intelligence and great contribution to the Japanese post war development is in striking contrast to his life style and strong desire to remain in accord with the nature of his home environment including the rescue of their native dogs. He is a man who drives to love a life as independent as possible and as close as possible to the nature of his home country by almost opposing westernized/American's acquisitions. Akita dogs are his close companions as they are best equipped to share his chosen life style.