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Free eBook Mulberry Child: A Memoir of China download

by Jian Ping

Free eBook Mulberry Child: A Memoir of China download ISBN: 0984277900
Author: Jian Ping
Publisher: MoraQuest (November 8, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 322
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Historical
Size MP3: 1993 mb
Size FLAC: 1954 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lit azw lrf mbr


She has in her poignant memoir helped Westerners to understand this little-known period in China's history, and put tragic and heroic faces to the individuals who suffered through that time. Jian Ping's poignant and compelling tale of growing up in China during the difficult times of the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution is an important addition to "scar literature" published in the West about events and people and victims forgotten, buried or silenced by the mainland Chinese and their government over the past four decades.

Mulberry Child is the heart-wrenching true story of a childhood in Communist China. Jian Ping is the daughter of a senior government official in the rural northeast of the country, growing up at a time of famine and political upheaval in the 1960s

Mulberry Child is the heart-wrenching true story of a childhood in Communist China. Jian Ping is the daughter of a senior government official in the rural northeast of the country, growing up at a time of famine and political upheaval in the 1960s. Jian Ping’s innocent childhood comes to an abrupt end when the Cultural Revolution-a power struggle within the ruling party-engulfs the country like a wildfire. Jian Ping’s father, Hou Kai, is falsely accused of treason-he is detained, beaten, and publicly shamed.

She has in her poignant memoir helped Westerners to understand this little-known period in China's history, and put tragic and heroic faces to the individuals who suffered through that time.

Mulberry Child, a documentary heavy on re-enactments, shows the . The generation gap between the two is stark

Mulberry Child, a documentary heavy on re-enactments, shows the generation gap between a Chinese-American writer and her daughter. Jian Ping’s parents were prominent members of the Communist Party who were harassed, separated and confined after accusations of disloyalty. The generation gap between the two is stark. As a toddler Ms. Ping (born in 1960) pestered prison guards into letting her visit her imprisoned father; the footloose Lisa works hard so she can travel on weekends and proclaims her dislike for going too long without being spontaneous. Mulberry Child is the true story of a childhood before, during, and after the Cultural Revolution in China. Jian Ping's father, a high-ranking government official, was falsely accused of treason during the Cultural Revolution-he was detained, beaten, and publicly shamed.

Mulberry Child: A Memoir of China by Jian Ping (English) Paperback Book Free Sh. China youth sports, games & amusements, 1981 book - acrobats & ping-pong.

Ru Xue Yu Gu Dian Xue Ping Lun Di Er Ji by Yi Zeng (Chinese) Paperback Book Free. Mulberry Child is important reading for anyone who wants to understand where modern China has come from

As an emotional and cultural distance grew between her and her daughter, Jian began to write her memoir.

As an emotional and cultural distance grew between her and her daughter, Jian began to write her memoir. And on a trip to modern China to visit relatives, Jian began to educate herJian Ping was born in China in 1960, during the cultural revolution. After many hardships, she immigrated to America where she gave birth to her own daughter. As an emotional and cultural distance grew between her and her daughter, Jian began to write her memoir.

Mulberry Child is the story of the persecution and survival of Jian Ping's family during this difficult period. their reputations ruined. Mulberry Child is the story of the persecution and survival of Jian Ping's family. See full summary . Director

Mulberry Child is the true story of a childhood before, during, and after the Cultural Revolution in China. Jian Ping's father, a high-ranking government official, was falsely accused of treason during the Cultural Revolution-he was detained, beaten, and publicly shamed. Her mother Gu Wenxiu, a top administrator of a middle school, was paraded in public and detained by the Revolution Committee and the Red Guards-both driving forces of the Cultural Revolution. Facing abuse and deprivation, Jian Ping's family stands steadfastly together, from her aging grandmother, a frail woman with bound feet, to her parents and siblings. The traumatic impacts of their experiences shape the course of their lives forever. Based on her own memories, as well as interviews and exhaustive research, Mulberry Child is a family saga and a tale of resilience, a coming of age story told through the eyes of an innocent child. Mulberry Child allows us an insider's look into a closed-off world and is written with compassion in honest and intimate language. Testimonials "Jian Ping's book Mulberry Child is a moving account of her family's struggle to survive China's Cultural Revolution. She has in her poignant memoir helped Westerners to understand this little-known period in China's history, and put tragic and heroic faces to the individuals who suffered through that time. Mulberry Child is important reading for anyone who wants to understand where modern China has come from." --Rob Gifford, former Beijing Correspondent of NPR, and author of China Road: A Journey into the Future of a Rising Power "Jian Ping pays tribute to her parents who struggled against tremendous odds.... that she herself survived to write this memoir, and to tell it with such maturity and wisdom and forgiveness, is a tribute to her family, her generation and her nation." --Larry Engelmann, author of Feather in a Storm and Daughter of China "In Mulberry Child, Jian Ping has written a moving, important account of an extraordinary time. And she has done so with grace, acuity and a generosity of spirit. Mulberry Child is one compelling read." --Alex Kotlowitz, author of There Were No Children Here
User reviews
Zulurr
This is the detailed story of what happened to Jian Ping's parents--both previously leading officials--her beloved grandmother, an aunt, and her siblings during the Cultural Revolution in China, usually dated from 1967 to 1976. Although many other personal accounts of this terrifying period have been written, Jian Ping's story certainly ranks among the most honest and, indeed, the most riveting, beginning with her near death as a baby and continuing--with her father's forced imprisonment and her mother's forced days in a room where she had to write criticisms of herself--with the family's move from comfortable quarters in a compound to a mud hut with no running water or privy. With her parents being accused of being on the wrong side of the Revolution, Jian and her siblings faced ostracism and even attacks from other children. In one memorable scene, her older brother came to her defense when she was being attached by a group of children. Later, her two older sisters were sent to the countryside to live and work in extremely sparse and bitterly cold conditions. How they all--except finally the grandmother--survived and even succeeded in the end is a tribute to their courage and endurance.
Nikojas
This book “Mulberry Child” is a vivid account of the misery and suffering families had to endure under Mao’s regime. I have read books about the Cultural Revolution in China, including one of Mao Tse-Tung’s biographies. I was shocked with the way he manipulated the young people, turning them against each other and even against their own family. But this book reported through the eyes of a child who experienced atrocities and saw her parents, her siblings being torn apart, is heart breaking. It is hard to conceive that, like the mulberry trees, children “thrived enduring not only the trials of nature but also the abuses of people” (to use the author’s own words). And survived! It is a slow paced book which makes it more depressing and at times I had to put it down. I wonder how one lives with such memories. Nevertheless it is a good book from the historical point of view.
Umdwyn
I loved this. I am slightly obsessed with personal accounts of the Cultural Revolution and this is one of the most interesting I've read. It's entirely written from the first-person point of view of the author from her infancy through to young adulthood. I really felt transported. I hope that the author will write an update to this book where she tells the story of leaving China and ending up in the US. I would love to read that story too.
Zeus Wooden
Gives a true insight into her family's struggle to survive in China's Cultural Revolution.
She writes thru' the eyes of the innocent child and the older person. Her compassion and honest feelings are a powerful force behind her story.
We are all the wiser in understanding the China of today because of what she writes of the past.
GoodLike
This book continuously held my interest. It gives insight not only into the lives of an unusually loving and gifted family in China, but also into a frightening era of Chinese history--the cultural revolution. Jian Ping writes in an engaging, open way about her experiences and those of her parents and siblings during a difficult time in China's history as they withstood almost unbearable living conditions yet survived to prosper in their country.
Wooden Purple Romeo
Amazing story and heartfelt of a family and their strength during the Cultural Revolution in China, but first and foremost the story of a mother and daughter.
Nuadora
Loved this story of love, perseverance and bravery.
An informative look at the affects of the Chinese Cultural revolution on China's people through the eyes of someone who experienced it.