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Free eBook William Shakespeare: A Popular Life download

by Garry O'Connor

Free eBook William Shakespeare: A Popular Life download ISBN: 1557834652
Author: Garry O'Connor
Publisher: Applause Theatre & Cinema Books; Expanded edition (May 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 382
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Historical
Size MP3: 1870 mb
Size FLAC: 1371 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: rtf lrf lrf txt


William Shakespeare book.

William Shakespeare book. Garry O'Connor's biography creates a vivd impression of Shakespeare's family life, his marriage and sexuality, the intimate details of his background, and his relationships with the theatre, his audiences and the towering political figures of his time such as Queen Elizabeth and the Earl of Essex.

Garry O'Connor (writer). Garry O'Connor is a playwright, biographer and novelist. but the dimension of one who is still living'. William Shakespeare: A Popular Life.

William Shakespeare : a popular life. William Shakespeare : a popular life. Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616, Dramatists, English, Theatrical managers, Actors.

Garry O'Connor's biography creates a vivd impression of Shakespeare's family life, his marriage and sexuality, the intimate details of his background, and his relationships with the theatre, his audiences and the towering political figures of his time such as Queen Elizabeth and the Earl of Essex.

by Garry O’Connor (Author). Gary O’Connor portrays Shakespeare’s life in clarity, starting with his family life, the troubles he had and the making of hi. hrough relating Shakespeare’s life experiences to the plays Shakespeare wrote this gives a fresh spin to shakespeare's life and work. O'Connor presents shakespeare as a full-blooded person as opposed to the nearly sainted playwright of some critics' imaginations.

William Shakespeare: A Popular Life, Applause Books (New York, NY) . O'Connor profiled another legendary presence from film and theater with Alec Guinness: A Life.

William Shakespeare: A Popular Life, Applause Books (New York, NY), 1999. Paul Scofield, Macmillan (London, England), 2001, published as Paul Scofield: An Actor for All Seasons, Applause Theatre/Cinema Books (New York, NY), 2002.

William Shakespeare: A Popular Life,Garry O'Connor. Author: Garry O'Connor ISBN 10: 1557834016. Title: William Shakespeare: A Popular Life Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Books will be free of page markings. The Tempest by William Shakespeare, Simon Callow.

(Applause Books). Garry O'Connor's biography creates a vivd impression of Shakespeare's family life, his marriage and sexuality, the intimate details of his background, and his relationships with the theatre, his audiences and the towering political figures of his time such as Queen Elizabeth and the Earl of Essex. It captures the darkness and confusion of his religious feelings, and his painful search for identity as well as his continuous commitments to change and development. O'Connor imaginatively and persuasively reconstructs the playwright's life and career.
User reviews
Nejind
There is little actually known of Shakespeare's life so any biography is conjecture. This one is so full of historical errors that there's no reason to believe his conjecture. For example, on page 49, he makes the big error of telling readers that Mary, Queen of Scots, (Mary Stuart or Mary I of Scotland), was the half-sister of Queen Elizabeth I. Wrong! Elizabeth's half-sister was Mary I of England (reigned 1553-58). Didn't he bother checking this simple fact? Obviously not. During that part he keeps calling them "sisters". He also has Philip of Spain marrying Mary, Queen of Scots. Again, wrong! He married the English queen, Mary I, in 1556. A easy confusion but not if someone is writing it as fact and they should check facts. He also (p 55) has the English not following up on the defeat of the Spanish armada. Why should they? The Spanish invasion was stopped and there was no reason to transport troops to Spain for an invasion. England was having enough trouble with France just across the Channel! So with such errors (that would have taken only a few minutes to check) O'Connor's conjecture cannot be taken seriously and this book consigned to the trash bin.
Maldarbaq
When I first found this book, I visited Amazon to look for reviews and recommendations. Finding none, I thought that I would offer my thoughts. I like O'Connor's approach. He does not wade through conflicting scholarly theories or get bogged down analyzing obscure English public records searching from traces of Shakespeare. He makes use of what we know from the spare records of Shakespeare's life; and he extrapolates from his own insights into the plays and his knowledge of the plays in their historical context. O'Connor also makes use of a varied and extensive bibliography.
O'Connor puts the plays and the life of Shakespeare in the context of their time, and Shakespeare emerges as an astute, talented, subtle, and versatile man in a vibrant and turbulent time. We see Shakespeare as a contemporary Elizabethan who had his finger on the pulse of society but who was smart enough to keep his fingers out of the pie. O'Connor shows how Shakespeare also used theater as an outlet to express personal struggles and discord. O'Connor's use of excerpts from the plays and sonnets illustrates this excellently.
One of the drawbacks of the book is that O'Connor's tone is of an insider not only of the theatrical world but also of Shakespeare's world. I got the sense that I am supposed to understand all of the obscure references and the oblique tongue-in-cheek quips. On a few occasions in the book when I got the reference, I could not tell if O'Connor was making a mistake or making a joke. He refers to a novelized interpretation of Shakespeare's love life by Anthony Burgess as "Brighter than the Sun," but the actual title is "Nothing Like the Sun." It was difficult to tell if O'Connor was in error or if he was poking fun at the brilliant, stylized, and occasionally pedantic writing of Burgess. O'Connor also suggests that in "King Lear," it was not Lear who confused his Fool with Cordelia at the end of the play ("And my poor fool is hanged"), but rather that the tired playwright mixed-up the two characters because they were played by the same actor.
Another drawback is the general style of writing. O'Connor's sentences are often very long and complex. I found myself rereading sentences more than twice in order to get his point. This drawback is minor and has much to do with the British style of punctuation, but it is also obvious.
O'Connor presents assumptions about Shakespeare's family relationships that I can accept, in particular the relationships with his mother, father, wife, and son. These assumptions are based on the scant historical records, commentary by writers and actors, and excerpts from the plays and sonnets. O'Connor also writes that despite the opinion that Shakespeare did not reveal his personal beliefs in his plays, we really can know Shakespeare through his writings. There are speeches and characters that exactly fit their places in the plays, and yet somehow they also transcend the context of the play and speak to us. Through these passages we know the personal musings of Shakespeare. Perhaps that is the most important thing of all, and that is a notion that definitely can be taken from O'Connor's book.