» » Asa Gray: American Botanist, Friend of Darwin

Free eBook Asa Gray: American Botanist, Friend of Darwin download

by A. Hunter Dupree

Free eBook Asa Gray: American Botanist, Friend of Darwin download ISBN: 0801837413
Author: A. Hunter Dupree
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (October 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 536
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Historical
Size MP3: 1778 mb
Size FLAC: 1817 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: rtf mbr lrf azw


The leading American botanist of the nineteenth century, Asa Gray helped organize the main generalizations of the science of plant geography.

The leading American botanist of the nineteenth century, Asa Gray helped organize the main generalizations of the science of plant geography.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Asa Gray: American Botanist, Friend of Darwin as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

By A. Hunter Dupree Authors and affiliations. American Botanist, Friend of Darwin.

Reprinted by The Johns Hopkins University Press, 701 West 40th S. Suite 275, Baltimore, MD 21211. Authors and affiliations. Reprinted by The Johns Hopkins University Press, 701 West 40th S.

Asa Gray - 1967 - In Raymond Jackson Wilson (e., Darwinism and the American Intellectual. Hunter Dupree, Erwin Hiebert, Chauncey Leake, Harry Woolf & Raymond Stearns - 1959 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 50:157-158

Asa Gray - 1967 - In Raymond Jackson Wilson (e. Homewood, Il. Dorsey Press. Gordon Sutherland, Helmut Schelsky, Kalman H. Silvert, Donald G. MacRae & A. Hunter Dupree - 1971 - Minerva 9 (1):141-158. Hunter Dupree, Erwin Hiebert, Chauncey Leake, Harry Woolf & Raymond Stearns - 1959 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 50:157-158. The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or, the Preservation of Favored Races in the Struggle for Life. Charles Darwin - 1993 - Modern Library.

Anderson Hunter Dupree, American historian, educator. Recipient Presidential award New York Academy of Sciences, 1976; fellow Center Advanced Study Behavioral Sciences, 1967-1968, National Humanities Center, 1978-1979. src "/web/img/loading. gif" data-src "/web/show-photo. jpg?id 962762&cache false" alt "Other photo of Anderson Hunter Dupree" class "gallery img" height "167". Other photo of Anderson Hunter Dupree. jpg?id 962763&cache false" alt "Other photo of Anderson Hunter Dupree" class "gallery img" height "167".

Elizabeth Barnaby Keeney, "Asa Gray: American Botanist, Friend of Darwin. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why?

Elizabeth Barnaby Keeney, "Asa Gray: American Botanist, Friend of Darwin. A. Hunter Dupree," Isis 81, no. 2 (Ju. 1990): 366-368. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why?

ONE of the first great American botanists, Asa Gray (1810-88), was a founder of the science of plant geography, a science that was also of tremendous interest to Charles Darwin.

ONE of the first great American botanists, Asa Gray (1810-88), was a founder of the science of plant geography, a science that was also of tremendous interest to Charles Darwin. It is to Gray that we owe the recognition of the relation of the floras of eastern North America with those of eastern Asia. View Full Article in Timesmachine . Advertisement.

Dupree, A. Hunter (1988). Asa Gray, American Botanist, Friend of Darwin. Charles Darwin The Correspondence of Charles Darwin:, Volume 12; Volume 1864, p. 212, at Google Books. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 978-0-801-83741-8. a b Dan Lewis Fische Early Southwest Ornithologists, 1528-1900, p. 82-83, at Google Books. Francis Whittier PennellThe Scrophulariaceae of Eastern Temperate North America at Google Books. Dupree, p. 310. ^ OBITUARY RECORD OF GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE Deceased during the Academical Year ending in June 3 1856 (PDF).

The leading American botanist of the nineteenth century, Asa Gray helped organize the main generalizations of the science of plant geography. The manual of botany that carries his name is still in use today. Friend and confidant of Charles Darwin, Gray became the most persistent and effective American protagonist of Darwin's views. Yet at the same time, he believed that religion and Darwin's theory of natural selection could coexist. A. Hunter Dupree's authoritative biography offers the first full-length interpretation of one of America's most important men of science.
User reviews
Hurus
This fine biography is informative in 3 related ways. It is an excellent narrative and analysis of the life of a major 19th century American scientist, provides valuable information about the institutional development of American science, and is an insightful look at the reception of Darwin's ideas in the USA. Asa Gray was one of the major American scientific figures of mid-19th century America. Born, raised, and educated in upstate New York, Gray trained as a physician but his interest in natural history led him to botany, becoming the protege of the then preeminent American botanist John Torrey. By dint of his considerable intellectual abilities, hard work, and some luck, Gray became a Professor at Harvard and one of the few professional scientists in the USA. At a time when descriptive botany and taxonomy were at the forefront of biology, Gray became the center of a network of American plant scientists. The expansion of the USA across the continent and his alliance with prominent British and European botanists provided him with what was an overwhelming amount of material but also a preeminent position in world botany. By the 1850s, Gray was major figure in American science with leadership roles in important American scientific institutions and journals.

Gray became a major figure in plant taxonomy and pioneer in plant biogeography, which had great importance in his acceptance of Darwin's ideas. As a very active taxonomist, Gray was preoccupied with issues of classification and had to consider carefully the issues of what constituted a species and the relationships of species and genera. These issues led Gray to a rather modern concept of species, emphasizing morphological similarity but also interbreeding and genetic relationships. Given the complete absence of any knowledge of genetics, this was a brilliant intuition. Dupress shows nicely how Gray's preoccupation with species relationships, his concept of species, and his considerable knowledge of plant distributions prepared Gray's mind for Darwin's ideas. Gray became Darwin's leading advocate in the USA. He leant his considerable prestige to Darwin's cause, assisted publication of his books, and wrote articles explicating and defending Darwin's ideas. Gray enjoyed both warm professional and personal relations with Darwin until the latter's death.

Gray's advocacy of Darwin exacerbated a conflict with another great figure of American science, the flamboyant Swiss-American naturalist Louis Agassiz. Even before the conflict over Darwin, Gray and Agassiz exemplified very different approaches to science with Agassiz propounding a highly romantic and idealistic (in the Platonic sense) form of science. Agassiz was also at the heart of very ambitious plans to reshape American science, both in Boston and nationwide, into a form that Gray found unattractive. In almost all the debates, and most importantly the one over Darwin's ideas, Agassiz was defeated.

Dupree is particularly good on the intersection of Gray's approach to science, issues of philosophy, and religion. Gray's approach to science, unlike Agassiz, was highly empirical and inspired in good part by the idea of looking for evidence of divine design. A sincerely religious man, though not doctrinaire, Gray worked hard to reconcile his biology with Christianity. Since he never endorsed biblical inerrancy, literal departures from Scripture were no obstacle for him. The potential of Darwin's ideas for exploding the argument from design was a concern and Gray became an advocate of a form of theistic evolution. Dupree suggests that some of Gray's thinking on the relationship of science to religion and other issues had unexpected consequences, becoming an influence of the American pragmatists.

Written very well, this book is a very enjoyable read, and quite illuminating about 19th century America.
Anayaron
This book does a good job of chronicling Asa Gray's official life as a botanist, Harvard professor, organizer, scientific politician, and "grand old man" of nineteenth century American evolutionism. Unfortunately, the man and the plants to which he devoted his life fall through the cracks of this estimable program. Gray comes out seeming cold and complacent, and the plants come out seeming cut and dried, like the herbarium specimens that were his main professional concern. That was disappointing because the impression I'd gotten of Gray from others sources-- books about Darwin and Darwinism-- seemed to portray a more interesting man. The author keeps claiming that Gray's reputation as a "closet botanist," a dry collector of facts, was unjustified, but he keeps giving that impression anyway. Personally, I could have done with a lot less about Gray's attempts to integrate Darwinism with his orthodox Presbyterianism. Over fifty years after this one was published, Gray could do with another biography.
Sorryyy
I'm writing this several years after having read the book (my memory jogged by the news that the U.S. Postal Service will be coming out with an Asa Gray stamp soon), so I can't be as detailed as I would like. But this is a remarkable book, surely one of the best biographies of an American scientist ever written. It starts by evoking the lost world of Gray's youth in upstate New York, then a part of the country brimming with economic and intellectual activity (did you know there was once a medical school in the Adirondacks?). It then moves on to detail his work in New York City with pioneering botanist John Torrey, his appointment at Harvard, his building of the botanical collections there, his battles with Louis Agassiz, and his remarkable correspondence and collaboration with Charles Darwin. The result is an extraordinarily rich portrait of 19th century scientific life.