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Free eBook Russia's People of Empire: Life Stories from Eurasia, 1500 to the Present download

by Edited by Stephen M. Norris and Willard Sunderland

Free eBook Russia's People of Empire: Life Stories from Eurasia, 1500 to the Present download ISBN: 0253001838
Author: Edited by Stephen M. Norris and Willard Sunderland
Publisher: Indiana University Press (July 11, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 384
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Historical
Size MP3: 1785 mb
Size FLAC: 1182 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: txt lit mobi doc


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Russia's People of Empire. In any event, as this book makes patently clear in its 31 biographical essays, Russia is a complex, multi-ethnic state founded, shaped and expanded by rulers, leaders, thinkers and artists who came from a wide variety of nations, confessions and traditions. Yes, we all know about Catherine the Great (German) and Stalin (Georgian), but there have been a broad variety of souls, from Lomonosov, Gogol and Borodin, to Bagration, Shamil and Mannerheim, who have influenced all aspects of Russian culture, science and politics by injecting influences from other cultures and traditions.

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Russia's People of Empire explores this enduring multicultural world through life stories of 31 individuals-famous and obscure, high born and low, men and women-that illuminate the cross-cultural exchanges at work from the late 1500s to post-Soviet Russia. Working on the scale of a single life, these microhistories shed new light on the multicultural character of the Russian Empire, which both shaped individuals' lives and in turn was shaped by them. eISBN: 978-0-253-00184-9.

Russia’s People of Empire explores this enduring multicultural world through life stories of 31 individuals―famous and obscure, high born and low, men and women―that illuminate the cross-cultural exchanges at work from the late 1500s to post-Soviet Russia. Working on the scale of a single life, these microhistories shed new light on the multicultural character of the Russian Empire, which both shaped individuals’ lives and in turn was shaped by them.

Stephen M. Norris, Willard Sunderland Stephen M. Norris is Associate Professor of History at Miami University of Ohio. Norris, Willard Sunderland. Indiana University Press, 11‏/07‏/2012 - 368 من الصفحات. Russia’s People of Empire explores this enduring multicultural world through life stories of 31 individuals―famous and obscure, high born and low, men and women―that illuminate the cross-cultural exchanges at work from the late 1500s to post-Soviet Russia. Working on the scale of a single life, these microhistories shed new light on the multicultural character of the Russian Empire, which both shaped individuals’ lives and in turn was shaped by them Stephen M.

Pp. xviii + 365. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. Norris and Sunderland write that ‘Alexandra’s and Stalin’s stories illuminate how the complicated contexts of Russia’s condition as a multinational state and society intertwined at a personal level to influence the course of the country’s past’ (p. 3). In Alexandra’s case this was because her personality helped reinforce Nicholas II’s unthinking conservatism, and because her German origin

Russia's People of Empire explores this enduring multicultural world through life stories of 31 individuals-famous and obscure, high born and low, men and women-that illuminate the cross-cultural exchanges at work from the late 1500s to post-Soviet Russia.

Автор: Norris Stephen . Sunderland Willard Название: Russia& People of Empire: Life Stories from . Описание: An analysis of Russia& response to globalization. This book explores how Russian domestic politics shape this international engagement.

Описание: An analysis of Russia& response to globalization.

Russia’s People of Empire: Life Stories from Eurasia, 1500 to the Present (Indiana University Press, 2012) p. 7-26. Social Horizons: Preface, in Eugene M. Avrutin and John Randolph (ed., Russia in Motion: Cultures of Human Mobility Since 1850 (University of Illinois Press, 2012) p. 01-106.

A fundamental dimension of the Russian historical experience has been the diversity of its people and cultures, religions and languages, landscapes and economies. For six centuries this diversity was contained within the sprawling territories of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, and it persists today in the entwined states and societies of the former USSR. Russia's People of Empire explores this enduring multicultural world through life stories of 31 individuals―famous and obscure, high born and low, men and women―that illuminate the cross-cultural exchanges at work from the late 1500s to post-Soviet Russia. Working on the scale of a single life, these microhistories shed new light on the multicultural character of the Russian Empire, which both shaped individuals' lives and in turn was shaped by them.

User reviews
Samuhn
Should you find yourself so unlucky to be in the company of someone arguing for a "Russia for Russians" or similar nationalistic nonsense, you would do well to have this book in your arsenal. Not for flinging at the fool, of course, but for citation and reasoned argument. As if that gets one very far these days...

In any event, as this book makes patently clear in its 31 biographical essays, Russia is a complex, multi-ethnic state founded, shaped and expanded by rulers, leaders, thinkers and artists who came from a wide variety of nations, confessions and traditions. Yes, we all know about Catherine the Great (German) and Stalin (Georgian), but there have been a broad variety of souls, from Lomonosov, Gogol and Borodin, to Bagration, Shamil and Mannerheim, who have influenced all aspects of Russian culture, science and politics by injecting influences from other cultures and traditions.

The objective of this collection is to use the personal, microhistoric approach allowed by biography to "open up a view on the long-running effects of what it meant to live in a densely multicultural neighborhood." That the volume begins with biographies of Ermak Timofeyevich - the Cossack who opened up Siberia, and Simeon Bekbulatovich - the Tatar prince that Ivan IV installed on the Kremlin throne for a year, and ends with the writer Boris Akunin and the Kremlin puppeteer Vladislav Surkov, gives a sense of the breadth of its coverage.

It would be silly to expect that the fullness of Russian cultural diversity could be expressed in a single 350-page book, and the editors well admit they have no such pretensions. But it is an invaluable start down the road to grasping the often sadly overlooked diversity that Russians will joke about ("scratch a Russian and you find a Tatar") but rarely embrace (contrast the continued discrimination against Tatars with the reality that Tatar princes and descendants of the Mongols were instrumental in the expansion of the Russian empire under Ivan IV).

Each biography here opens a door onto unknown pages of history. Yes, there are biographies of the sort of better-known luminaries enumerated above. But the strength of this book is how these are balanced by biographies of unknown souls who had great influence or whose lives signified the times they lived in, from a fake Circassian princess, to a Central Asian poet, to an itinerant pretender to the Russian throne.

As reviewed in Russian Life magazine.
Fordrelis
Excellent historical book!!!