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by Elena Gorokhova

Free eBook A Mountain of Crumbs: A Memoir download ISBN: 1439125686
Author: Elena Gorokhova
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (February 8, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 336
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Historical
Size MP3: 1543 mb
Size FLAC: 1102 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: doc lrf mobi docx


Читать онлайн A Mountain of Crumbs. A mountain of crumbs.

Elena Gorokhova A MOUNTAIN OF CRUMBS A MEMOIR For my mother, Galina Konstantinovna Maltseva 1. Ivanovo I WISH MY MOTHER HAD come from Leningrad, from the world of Pushkin and the tsars, of granite embankments and lace ironwork, of pearly domes buttressing the low sky. Leningrad’s sophistication would have infected her the moment she drew her first breath, and all the curved façades and stately bridges. Читать онлайн A Mountain of Crumbs. For my mother, Galina Konstantinovna Maltseva.

A Mountain of Crumbs book . Even if Elena Gorokhova weren't such a gorgeous writer, her memoir, "A Mountain of Crumbs," would be a terrific read. Gorokhova grew up in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and '70s, where her life was unremarkable in many ways: Her mother was a doctor, her father a member of the Communist Party, her older sister hoped to be an actress.

A Mountain of Crumbs: A Memoir Hardcover – January 12, 2010. Elena Gorokhova has written the Russian equivalent of Angela's Ashes, an intimate story of growing up into young womanhood told with equal grace and humor. - Billy Collins, former . by. Elena Gorokhova (Author).

In A Mountain of Crumbs, her exquisitely wrought, tender memoir of growing up in the Soviet Union, Elena Gorokhova relives their brief encounter as a significant experience that may have contained the germ of her later attraction to someone from an unknowable world - and he. .

In A Mountain of Crumbs, her exquisitely wrought, tender memoir of growing up in the Soviet Union, Elena Gorokhova relives their brief encounter as a significant experience that may have contained the germ of her later attraction to someone from an unknowable world - and her desire to leave her own. A Mountain of Crumbs (which takes its title from a game Gorokhova’s grandmother invented during a famine in the 1920s) could be taught as a master class in memoir writing: the key is not to collect facts and recollections but to truthfully reimagine one’s life.

Elena Gorokhova has travelled a long way since she left Russia for America in 1980 as a disillusioned young woman

Elena Gorokhova has travelled a long way since she left Russia for America in 1980 as a disillusioned young woman. Here she instantly wins us with her candour and twinkly eye for the absurd, but the sharp phrase and brisk tempo are underscored with poignancy from the moment we hear the story of the "crumb game". During the famine of the 20s, in a classic instance of desperate Soviet resourcefulness, Gorokhova's grandmother told her starving youngest child that the lone sugar-cube she crumbled into a tiny heap was in fact "a whole mountain of crumbs" – magic! The child.

Elena Gorokhova's "A Mountain of Crumbs "is the moving story of a Soviet girl who discovers the truths adults are hiding from her and the lies her homeland lives by. Elena's country is no longer the majestic Russia of literature or the tsars, but a nation struggling to retain its power and it. Elena's country is no longer the majestic Russia of literature or the tsars, but a nation struggling to retain its power and its pride.

A Mountain of Crumbs is a book by Elena Gorokhova (linguist) first published in 2010. The book is a memoir of the author's early life in Saint Petersburg (then Leningrad) before she moved to the US in the 1970s

A Mountain of Crumbs is a book by Elena Gorokhova (linguist) first published in 2010. The book is a memoir of the author's early life in Saint Petersburg (then Leningrad) before she moved to the US in the 1970s. The book's title was from Gorokhova's grandmother, who told her young children not to complain about lack of food and crumbled their black bread and sugar cubes into a "whole mountain of crumbs".

A mountain of crumbs : a memoir. Gorokhova, Elena. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

A Mountain of Crumbs: A Memoir - ኤ-መጽሐፍ የተጻፈው በElena Gorokhova። ይህን መጽሐፍ በእርስዎ የፒሲ፣ android፣ iOS መሣሪያዎች ላይ የGoogle Play መጽሐፍት መተግበሪያን በመጠቀም ያንብቡት። ከመስመር ውጭ ለማንበብ ያውርዱት.

A Mountain of Crumbs: A Memoir - ኤ-መጽሐፍ የተጻፈው በElena Gorokhova። ይህን መጽሐፍ በእርስዎ የፒሲ፣ android፣ iOS መሣሪያዎች ላይ የGoogle Play መጽሐፍት መተግበሪያን በመጠቀም ያንብቡት። ከመስመር ውጭ ለማንበብ ያውርዱት፣ ያድምቁት፣ ዕልባት ያድርጉ ወይም A Mountain of Crumbs: A Memoirን እያነበቡ ሳለ ማስታወሻዎችን ይውሰዱ። . Elena Gorokhova’s A Mountain of Crumbs is the moving story of a Soviet girl who discovers the truths adults are hiding from her and the lies her homeland lives by. Elena’s country is no longer the majestic Russia of literature or the tsars, but a nation struggling to retain its power and its pride.

Elena Gorokhova’s A Mountain of Crumbs is the moving story of a Soviet girl who discovers the truths adults are hiding from her and the lies her homeland lives by.Elena’s country is no longer the majestic Russia of literature or the tsars, but a nation struggling to retain its power and its pride. Born with a desire to explore the world beyond her borders, Elena finds her passion in the complexity of the English language—but in the Soviet Union of the 1960s such a passion verges on the subversive. Elena is controlled by the state the same way she is controlled by her mother, a mirror image of her motherland: overbearing, protective, difficult to leave. In the battle between a strong-willed daughter and her authoritarian mother, the daughter, in the end, must break free and leave in order to survive.Through Elena’s captivating voice, we learn not only the stories of Russian family life in the second half of the twentieth century, but also the story of one rebellious citizen whose curiosity and determination finally transport her to a new world. It is an elegy to the lost country of childhood, where those who leave can never return.
User reviews
Auridora
I found this book very interesting for I've been a student of Russian culture and politics since high school.
It has proved what I know about Russian, from 19th century and serfdom forward. The personal experience depicted
is interesting 'cause it reflects my own youth in another similar environment, post communist China in the 1980's.
And it's from a woman's perspective, through a family's not long ago history, only three generations. That suits my interest too. I can see
why it's confusing and dull to some readers who are not familiar with Soviet past and not being a woman growing up
with similar expereince. A come to age story as this book is, why should it be interesting to a man of stark different age and background?
For people who don't speak Russian the quoted Russian phrases in phonetics would be distracting too.
So if you're not into this book I totally understand why. But I like this book. It's a page turner and fun to read.
Kabandis
Reading mountain of crumbs brought my beloved late husband Valodia back to life for me. So many parallels - Val was born in 1998 and became separated from his family in 1941 spending the next 5 years as a son of the regiment during WW II. His home was Leningrad, his mother the daughter of a rabbi and he eventually became the youngest senior professor at the University of Leningrad (English Literature was his Master) PhD was educational psychology. He worked as an interpreter for visiting international groups and eventually became a refusenik traveling to the USA in 1979. His story is intense and needs to be told. Elena would be perfect for this task. I was sorry to see her stories end.
Nern
So vivid, so descriptive and yet filled with emotion. In addition, it is not often that we get to read about this period of Russia's history other than in a propaganda context. Many books have been written about tsars and gulags, but growing up and studying during the Cold War era in very unusual, and the author does it in such a way that the reader feels part of her family and friends. Thanks to Ms. Gorokhova we enter the world of her mother's education and upbringing which allows us to understand better not only some of her actions and attitudes, but those of her generation. A must read.
Granijurus
This is an interesting book about growing up in the U.S.S.R., and then getting out. There are no surprises for older folk like me who grew up in the 50's, 60's and 70's but it could be very enlightening for young people who may have socialist leanings.
Windbearer
This important book tells us, through the eyes of a young girl, what it was like to grow up behind the Iron Curtain: in the playgrounds, in the classrooms, in cramped living quarters, and even at the dental clinic.

The author portrays that drab world with telling details of shortages and long lines for everything, a monotonous diet, and skilful fingers that cut up an old coat, turned it inside out and made it into `new' skirt. At an early age Elena Gorokhova came to despise the modus operandi of the communist world: "The game is called vranyo... We all pretend to do something, and those who watch us pretend that they are seriously watching us and don't know we are only pretending". Seduced by the "decadent sound of the English language", she developed a fierce desire to escape this repressive regime, and it was her fluency in English that eventually opened the door to the West for her.

I bought this memoir partly because a review suggested that it had much in common with my own recently published memoir. And there is indeed an astonishing overlap between this story, set in the post-war communist society of Leningrad, and my story of growing up in the pre-war working-class culture of Coin Street in London. It is as if Elena Gorokhova and I grew up in parallel universes, twenty years and thirteen hundred miles apart! We each had a fierce, much-married mother, suffered the early loss of a book-loving father, and had very limited resources throughout our childhoods. Finally, for both of us, the escape route out of our dreary, restrictive worlds was provided by education.

A great read! I strongly recommend this book to social historians and to anyone interested in how a child thinks and struggles to understand the world of adults--and learns how to deal with that world.
komandante
This memoir is a fascinating look at what it was like growing up in the USSR during the Cold War years.Usually don't like memoirs but Ms Gorokhova has a way with words that is charming, funny and yet very realistic. She paints a picture of growing up in the Cold War years that is vivid yet not heavy or pedantic. Her mother and mother Russia have many of the same character traits. Elena's courageous move to the unknown and her hard work are poignantly portrayed. I hope she is working on the next section ... I can't wait to read it!
Meri
Elena Gorokova's beautifully written memoir is a engrossing reading experience. Now living in America, Gorokova recreates her early years in Russia in riveting detail that resonates in universality. Did I love this book? You bet I did! You know that rare book that makes you stop now and then just to savor the author's insight and beautiful expression? That's A Mountain of Crumbs. Readers will be captivated by this memoir that reveals real life in post World War II Russia that held generations of Americans in fear of Soviet power.
This is a must read for anyone interested in Russia. Reading this book is a delight. It is full of enlightening vignettes of soviet life. If you wonder why Russians think as they do, this book will help you to understand how vranyo......an all pervasive deceit........ percolates a culture and steals the souls of its striving people. Elena Gorokhova has captured the times and the people well in her memoir.