Free eBook Zuma download

by Jeremy Gordin

Free eBook Zuma download ISBN: 1868423816
Author: Jeremy Gordin
Publisher: Jonathan Ball Publishing; Second Edition edition (September 15, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 300
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Historical
Size MP3: 1310 mb
Size FLAC: 1769 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: mbr mobi lrf rtf


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Why should anyone write about me? I'm not an important person. I'm not a rich businessman.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. I'm not from a politically famous or royal family. jacob Zuma to biographer Jeremy Gordin But of course Zuma has been at the epicenter of South African politics. National elections loomed. Customer service is our top priority!

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Jacob Zuma to biographer Jeremy Gordin. This book promises to be immensely readable and, like its subject, highly controversial. Результаты поиска по книге.

Jacob Zuma to biographer Jeremy Gordin. But of course Zuma has been at the epicenter of South African politics, and his life has spilt almost daily onto the pages of South Africa’s newspapers. In this unauthorized biography, veteran journalist Jeremy Gordin takes the reader beyond the daily and weekly reporting to capture something of the man: his ambitions; the political rollercoaster he has been on; his travails in his quest to bethe next president of South Africa.

Since then Zuma's star has spectacularly risen - the corruption charges were dropped, he led the ANC to election victory and duly became President of South Africa, and his new cabinet and government appointments were generally well received. But he has also recently suffered a huge blow with revelations of another love-child, this time with the daughter of soccer supremo Irvine Khoza.

National elections loomed, but so did corruption charges and endless court battles d duly became President of South Africa, and his new cabinet and government appointments were generally well received

He covers in detail the highs and lows of Zuma's past 18 months, including the final salvo's of his legal battles, as well as his first year as President.

National elections loomed, but so.

National elections loomed, but so did corruption charges and endless court battles. Since then Zuma's star has spectacularly risen – the corruption charges were dropped, he led the ANC to election victory and duly became President of South Africa, and his new cabinet and government appointments were generally well received.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Zuma - Jeremy Gordin. In memory of. Miriam ‘Micky’ (Awerbuch) Gordin. mother, teacher, sceptic. AND FOR. Deborah, Jake and Nina Gordin.

The first edition of Zuma, published in late 2008, concluded with Jacob Zuma’s future balancing on a knife’s edge. National elections loomed, but so did corruption charges and endless court battles. Since then Zuma’s star has spectacularly risen – the corruption charges were dropped, he led the ANC to election victory and duly became President of South Africa, and his new cabinet and government appointments were generally well received. But he has also recently suffered a huge blow with revelations of another love child, this time with the daughter of soccer supremo Irvine Khoza. Many of his supporters have distanced themselves from him, and Zuma is looking isolated. Pundits are once again wondering how long he’ll survive as President. In this revised and updated edition, Jeremy Gordin takes the reader right up to present. He covers in detail the highs and lows of Zuma’s past 18 months, including the final salvoes of his legal battles, as well as his first year as President. New material in this paperback edition also includes the ‘Pedro’ document (a document Zuma wrote in 1986), and accurate information on his wives and children.
User reviews
Nicanagy
Written by a relatively sympathetic white South African journalist originally in 2008 and then updated in 2010, "Zuma" is a reminder that despite the many problems of his presidency (and pre-presidency to be honest) Jacob Zuma is still a person who did some important things for South Africa. He served 10 years in Robben Island, certainly proof of his bonafides, and more importantly played a critical role in calming the ANC/Inkatha rivalry in the early 90s that nearly brought the country to civil war. The part of the book about his life before liberation is the more interesting part, before it descends into the impenetrably boring details of the Arms Deal Scandal.
Fenritaur
The stories which the world outside South Africa has heard about president Jacob Zuma have not been confidence-inspiring. He has been prosecuted for corruption and rape, he is said to hold idiosyncratic social values, and his marital indiscretions are frequently in the headlines. So who is he, and how did he get to be president of the country? Jeremy Gordin, a journalist who has reported on Zuma's activities for many years, fills in the picture in this book.

Jacob Zuma was born into an impoverished Zulu family in 1942. As a child he was assigned to look after cattle, so he missed out on a formal education. He joined the African National Congress in 1959 and was arrested in 1963, spending 10 years on Robben Island and then 15 years working for the ANC from outside South Africa, becoming a leading figure in the ANC and a close friend of Thabo Mbeki. When Nelson Mandela retired from the presidency in 1999, Mbeki became president and Zuma became deputy president.

The story so far accounts for the first fifth of the book; the rest relates largely to the scandals, court cases and political struggles that have filled the past decade of Zuma's life. He failed to live within his means, leaving his expenses to be paid by friends and leading to allegations of corruption. His polygamy and extra-marital dalliances led to public ridicule. However, through all of the personal difficulties Zuma maintained a remarkable resilience and equanimity.

The book is interesting to read, and well-researched. The author clearly likes Jacob Zuma, and makes a strong case that much of the prosecution of him was politically motivated. Zuma is also shown to be a skilful and courageous negotiator and diplomat, and to have a very charming persona. Nonetheless it is difficult to escape the impression that South African politics has been on a downward incline since the retirement of Mandela, and that South Africans would be better served by a more forward-looking leader.
Sharpbringer
The good news: "Zuma" is a non-judgmental and breezily written history of the power struggle that roiled the ANC in the mid-2000s. Even though the book stays focused on Zuma and his legal problems, it conveys a lot of smart information -- some of it new -- about South African politics. I liked it.

The bad news: "Zuma" is by NO stretch of the imagination a well-rounded biography of Jacob Zuma. Zuma had a long career in ANC politics before he took center stage in the legal soap opera that mesmerized South Africans a few years ago. He joined the ANC while still a teenager and spent 10 years on Robben Island in the 1960s. After his release, he rejoined the liberation struggle, did ANC work in Mozambique and Zambia, and eventually became the ANC's intelligence chief. He played an important role in the negotiations that led to the unbanning of the ANC in 1990 and later helped to end bloody fighting between the ANC and another black party in KwaZulu Natal. He served as a provincial cabinet minister in KZN after the democratic transition. He was Deputy President of South Africa from 1999 to 2005. Simply put, he was a major ANC player over a long period of time -- yet "Zuma" examines none of these chapters in his career in any depth. Similarly, Zuma's personal relationships, political allegiances, Zulu identity, and views on policy -- to the extent he has any -- are analyzed in only superficial terms.

But if "Zuma" flops as biography, it retells in gory journalistic detail the story of Zuma's fall from power in 2005 and his amazing comeback in 2009, when he was elected South Africa's President. Most of the action took place in courtrooms, beginning in 2003, when Zuma's key financial backer was indicted for bribing him. Zuma's proxies fought a vicious defensive action, slandering the country's top prosecutor as an apartheid-era spy (and triggering a high profile investigation). But when the case resulted in a conviction in 2005, Zuma resigned the Deputy Presidency and was soon thereafter indicted for corruption himself. Then the case was thrown out of court on a technicality. Then Zuma was prosecuted and acquited of rape. Then he was re-indicted for corruption. While the lawyers battled in court, Zuma fought back in the political arena, waging a campaign (backed by anti-Mbeki unions and the Communist Party) to wrest control of the ANC from Thabo Mbeki. This campaign reached a strange climax at the end of 2007, when Zuma became the ANC boss but Mbeki was left in control of the national government. In 2008 the corruption charges against Zuma were thrown out a second time when a judge found that the case had been manipulated for political purposes. It was now Mbeki's turn to resign from national office. Zuma's triumph seemed complete -- yet he was re-re-indicted for corruption only weeks later! And then, just a few weeks before national elections in 2009, prosecutors dropped the case for technical reasons -- for good! Zuma sailed into the Presidency.

It was a national roller coaster ride, with bombshells exploding daily in the press. South Africa got a tainted President, who has fathered at least one illegitimate child since entering office. However, the legal/constitutional system never broke down during the long melodrama, even though it was subjected to huge pressure. The country has moved on. South Africa's institutions are stronger than the men who manage (and try to manipulate) them.

Probably no one except a South African political junkie would want to read so many details about such complicated legal and political maneuvering. However, masochistic readers wanting to relive those crazy years, when it looked like the Mbeki and Zuma factions of the ANC might tear the party apart and carry down South Africa's constitutional system with it, will love "Zuma." But no one should turn to the book expecting a serious political biography.