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Free eBook Where Did You Sleep Last Night?: A Personal History download

by Danzy Senna

Free eBook Where Did You Sleep Last Night?: A Personal History download ISBN: 0374289158
Author: Danzy Senna
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Printing edition (May 12, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 208
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Ethnic and National
Size MP3: 1247 mb
Size FLAC: 1427 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: mobi docx txt mbr


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Danzy Senna's books, "Where did you sleep last night? A personal Memoir" has a beautifully woven, beautifully .

Danzy Senna's books, "Where did you sleep last night? A personal Memoir" has a beautifully woven, beautifully written and deeply emotional prose. I found the writing style entrancing, albeit choppy and all over the place.

A Personal History Senna Danzy Holtzbrink(MPS)/MPS 9780374289157 : When Danzy Sennas parents got married in 1968, they seemed poised to defy .

A Personal History Senna Danzy Holtzbrink(MPS)/MPS 9780374289157 : When Danzy Sennas parents got married in 1968, they seemed poised to defy history. 2009 Язык: ENG Размер: 2. 9 x 1. 4 x . 3 cm Поставляется из: США Описание: When Danzy Sennas parents got married in 1968, they seemed poised to defy history.

When Danzy Senna’s parents got married in 1968, they seemed poised to defy history. They were two brilliant young American writers from wildly divergent backgrounds-a white woman with a blue-blood Bostonian lineage and a black man, the son of a struggling single mother and an unknown father. They married in a year that seemed to separate the past from the present; together, these two would snub the histories that divided them and embrace a radical future.

Where Did You Sleep Last Night?: A Personal History, 2009. Farrar, Straus and Giroux: New York.

Her mother is white; her father is African-American. Growing up, Senna attended Boston public schools as well as the Elma Lewis School of Fine Arts, an alternative school in Roxbury founded to instill racial pride in black children through arts education. Senna graduated from Brookline High School. Where Did You Sleep Last Night?: A Personal History, 2009.

The novelist Danzy Senna delves into the pasts of her parents in this nonfiction investigation. Continue reading the main story. Danzy Senna’s Where Did You Sleep Last Night? ostensibly sets out to answer another question - Don’t you know who I am? - posed by the author’s father, Carl Senna, early in the book, when he visits after a lengthy estrangement to find that his 5-year-old daughter doesn’t recognize him. Thirty-odd years later, Danzy Senna confronts the reality that her father’s question still rings, still stings.

When Danzy Senna's parents got married in 1968, they seemed poised to defy history.

A Personal History kitabını oxuyarkən qeydlər götürün When Danzy Senna's parents got married in 1968, they seemed poised to defy history

A Personal History kitabını oxuyarkən qeydlər götürün When Danzy Senna's parents got married in 1968, they seemed poised to defy history.

Where did you sleep last night?: a personal history.

From Caucasia, with Love. Symptomatic: a novel. Where did you sleep last night?: a personal history.

Items related to Where Did You Sleep Last Night?

Items related to Where Did You Sleep Last Night?: A Personal History. Danzy Senna Where Did You Sleep Last Night?: A Personal History. ISBN 13: 9780374289157.

When Danzy Senna’s parents got married in 1968, they seemed poised to defy history. They were two brilliant young American writers from wildly divergent backgrounds—a white woman with a blue-blood Bostonian lineage and a black man, the son of a struggling single mother and an unknown father. They married in a year that seemed to separate the past from the present; together, these two would snub the histories that divided them and embrace a radical future. When their marriage disintegrated eight years later, it was, as one friend put it, “the ugliest divorce in Boston’s history”—a violent, traumatic war that felt all the more heartrending given the hopeful symbolism of their union.

Decades later, Senna looks back not only at her parents’ divorce but beyond it, to the opposing American histories that her parents had tried so hard to overcome. On her mother’s side of the family she finds—in carefully preserved documents—the chronicle of a white America both illustrious and shameful. On her father’s she discovers, through fragments and shreds of evidence, a no less remarkable history. As she digs deeper into this unwritten half of the story, she reconstructs a longburied family mystery that illuminates her own childhood. In the process, she begins to understand her difficult father, the power and failure of her parents’ union, and, finally, the forces of history.

Where Did You Sleep Last Night? is at once a potent statement of personal identity, a challenging look at the murky waters of American ancestry, and an exploration of narratives—the narratives we create and those we forget. Senna has given us an unforgettable testimony to the paradoxes—the pain and the pride—embedded in history, family, and race.

User reviews
Jox
I enjoyed this book very much. Ms Senna so openly sheared her search for her roots and her relations with her father's family and friends. Ms Senna pulled no punches with her descriptions and details which where sometimes shocking, unbelievable and humorous..
Gavinranadar
This memoir is fantastically crafted. Senna draws the reader in instantly. The book is written as part detective story, part history lesson, and part personal revelation and emotional views of family and race. This story is one of racial identity, but is strongly tied into familial history. This story is a familiar American tale, marriages ended and families torn apart due to alcohol and violence. This story is a candid look on one person's history in America. This book unfolds at a highly enjoyable and readable pace. It took me two days to read but I have been reflecting on it for the last week. I definitely recommend this book.
great ant
Fast shipping, book in good condition. I also really liked this book quite a bit. As someone who reads a lot of mixed race literature, I thought the personal history was quite fascinating and definitely adds something new to the body of literature that is being written, in that the author ultimately suggests that the mixed race individual is a mirror onto which others project their racial fantasies and desires. Very well written and interesting, as well.
Gigafish
I read this book as a part of a course on life-writing, and it really is not very good. The author's tone is whiny and irritating and the story, while it seems to have the makings of something compelling, just does not translate well and jump off the page. I wanted to like this book, but there is not enough of Senna herself in it to interest me. Unfortunately, it is a flat read because none of the "characters" are really ever fleshed out, and each one ends up becoming a flat stereotype of himself or herself. Save yourself some time and look for another memoir about a young woman exploring her identity through her family's story--there are plenty out there that are far superior to this book, which was so boring and repetitive by the end that it was hard to finish reading.
Uscavel
Danzy Senna has written, not a book about her parents or her family, but her evolution in understanding where and how she fits in with these people. Her writing style is captivating and concise, getting to the heart of what matters.

Her parents met through a work situation and got married in the late 1960s. This wouldn't be entirely unusual except that it was America in the 1960s, and the couple was an interracial one with histories that were at opposite ends of the spectrum. The background of her mother was Boston Brahmin, the most privileged and oldest families that had come to America, whereas the background of her father was black, southern, possibly Mexican, and largely unknown beyond that.

Senna recalls with clarity the components of her childhood: anger, violence, broken promises, divorced - and disappointed - parents. The crisis of the divorced child is then to choose a parent because to be loyal and loving to both would seem like a betrayal to one or the other. In the same sense, to be a child of a bi-racial couple and to look more like one parent, feels like a disservice to the race of the other parent.
It sounds like Senna has struggled with her identity while her parents have struggled with theirs. This book is a testament to her sorting out who she is, who her parents are, and even where this all leads.

She listens to her mother's stories. She travels with her father down south. She researches documents that might hold clues, and she talks to relatives she's never met. The secrets she uncovers, the places she visits, and the experience she has goes a long way to healing these old wounds.

Senna's account of her personal history is written like it was easy to record, but writing like this only comes about when someone has worked so hard for so long. This is someone who has struggled to understand her personal heritage, the complexities of race in America, and where to fit in between these two.