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Free eBook Missing Men: A Memoir download

by Joyce Johnson

Free eBook Missing Men: A Memoir download ISBN: 0143035231
Author: Joyce Johnson
Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (July 5, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 288
Category: Biography and Memoir
Subcategory: Arts and Literature
Size MP3: 1786 mb
Size FLAC: 1466 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: azw rtf lrf mobi


In Missing Men, a memoir that tells her mother’s story as well as her own, Johnson constructs an. .Joyce Johnson is the author of three novels, including The Night Café

In Missing Men, a memoir that tells her mother’s story as well as her own, Johnson constructs an equally unique self-portrait as she examines, from a woman’s perspective, the far-reaching reverberations of fatherlessness. Joyce Johnson is the author of three novels, including The Night Café. Her other books include Minor Characters, which was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Door Wide Open: A Beat Love Affair in Letters, 1957–1958. Библиографические данные. Missing Men: A Memoir.

A memoir of easy grace and lively intelligence, filled with striking portraits of individuals, a time, and a place. A big-hearted, commonsensical, thoroughly adult book. -The Washington Post. A memoir to savor, shot through with rueful humor and haunting compassion.

In Missing Men, a memoir that tells her mother's story as well as her own, Johnson constructs an equally unique self-portrait as she examines, from a woman's perspective, the far-reaching reverberations of fatherlessness. Telling a story that has "shaped itself around absences," Missing Men presents us with the arc and flavor of a unique New York life-from the author's adventures as a Broadway stage child to her fateful encounters with the two fatherless artists she marries.

Joyce Johnson?s classic Minor Charactersis valued not only for its portrayal of her relationship with Jack Kerouac but also for its stunning evocation of what it meant to grow up female in the 1950s

Joyce Johnson's eight books include the 1983 National Book Critics Circle Award winner Minor Characters, the recent memoir Missing Men, the novel In the Night Cafe, and Door Wide Open: A Beat Love Affair in Letters 1957-1958 (with Jack Kerouac)

Joyce Johnson's eight books include the 1983 National Book Critics Circle Award winner Minor Characters, the recent memoir Missing Men, the novel In the Night Cafe, and Door Wide Open: A Beat Love Affair in Letters 1957-1958 (with Jack Kerouac). She has written for Vanity Fair and The New Yorker and lives in New York City.

Joyce Johnson (born 1935) is an American author of fiction and nonfiction who won a National Book Critics Circle Award for her memoir Minor Characters about her relationship with Jack Kerouac. Born Joyce Glassman to a Jewish family in New York City, Joyce was raised on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, a few blocks from the apartment of Joan Vollmer Adams where William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac lived from 1944 to 1946

MISSING MEN: A Memoir, by Joyce Johnson.

MISSING MEN: A Memoir, by Joyce Johnson.

When Johnson is writing memoirs - she has written a further book of memoirs named Missing Men, she relies on her tendency to regard herself as an observer more than a participator; even in the thick of the beat heyday, on the arm of Kerouac, in the kitchen of William Burroughs'.

When Johnson is writing memoirs - she has written a further book of memoirs named Missing Men, she relies on her tendency to regard herself as an observer more than a participator; even in the thick of the beat heyday, on the arm of Kerouac, in the kitchen of William Burroughs' apartment, she always felt on the periphery. It's in my nature to be a watcher," she says. I'm looking for the truth of what happened - I don't want to fictionalise it. I want to find out, what was it really? That's what.

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From the author of Minor Characters, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award – an “intricate and compelling” (O, The Oprah Magazine) memoir that chronicles her childhood and her two ill-fated marriagesJoyce Johnson’s classic memoir of growing up female in the 1950s, Minor Characters, was one of the initiators of an important new genre: the personal story of a minor player on history’s stage. In Missing Men, a memoir that tells her mother’s story as well as her own, Johnson constructs an equally unique self-portrait as she examines, from a woman’s perspective, the far-reaching reverberations of fatherlessness. Telling a story that has "shaped itself around absences," Missing Men presents us with the arc and flavor of a unique New York life—from the author’s adventures as a Broadway stage child to her fateful encounters with the two fatherless artists she marries. Joyce Johnson’s voice has never been more compelling.
User reviews
Soustil
Johnson's recounting of her unusual and multi-faceted growing up is fascinating and full of surprises, but what has stuck with me is her depiction of life with two painters of the void-leaping era, true believers both, and how her own life had to adjust to stay abreast, to catch up, and incorporate that reality.

There's a real sadness in the situation of being an artist and not settling, only to find that the art world is rock hard and finding even a semi-permanent foothold is near to impossible. The art world moves fast and has a way of moving on without you.

I remember Peter Pinchbeck well (never knew him personally but used to see him "around") and knew his work. There are many like him who keep on doing their work and, if they're lucky, get a college gig to keep a little regular money coming in. And, if you're a man, there was usually a woman or two supporting you, helping you along.

It's a testimony to Johnson's strength that she managed to find a way to do her own work even though for many years that work was done along the edges of life, as a wife, mother, and single mother. So much of Johnson's own work deals with the inter-relation/dynamic involving both the supporting woman and the "genius" that must be supported -- a familiar situation during the era of which she writes. I think Johnson's depictions of the struggles involved in living that life are well-told: be it the Kerouac memoir (Minor Characters) or her novel dealing with her first marriage (to another 2nd generation Abstract Expressionist painter) In the Night Cafe.

I do feel that there is something left unsaid in the final portion of Missing Men. But what she did say is eloquent. A cautionary tale maybe: staking too much on one's place in history. Maybe I get that because I'm an artist myself. But if anyone is curious about the process of making art or being near that process, this is a very interesting window into some of the aspects.
Kulalbine
If you enjoy the genre of memoir---and especially like reading about the art world, the 1950s and 60s, and the lives of women---you should thoroughly enjoy this book. Joyce Johnson writes with real intimacy---she truly draws the reader into her life---and leaves you at the end wishing for more. Perhaps she will write one more memoir---about her life in publishing. We can all hope!

Unlike some of the other reviewers, I didn't find this book sad or wistful--just honest and affecting. Joyce Johnson is a gifted writer and her choice of words and descriptions always seems perfectly on the mark. I'm just left wishing that her three memoirs were longer---and more plentiful.
Clodebd
"Missing Men" is a terrific memoir, tender and tough. Johnson writes with honesty and great precision about fear and foreboding, about peach brandy, about grief, and downtown New York and especially about art. While many reviewers praise the first part of the book (Joyce-and-mama, Joyce-and-I-Remember-Mama), absorbing as it is, it's the end of the book I like best: her descriptions of artist Peter Pinchbeck's life and work. Lucid writing about art and artists is rare. Honesty about living a woman's life is too. "Missing Men" gives you both. It's moving, serious stuff.
Fenritaur
Such a wonderful touching book, i am immensely effected by the way Joyce Johnson describes lives of people close to her and also herself. After reading this book, i can imagine in my own way why she published so little, i wished she had many more books.
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This book is a refreshing change from so many literary memoirs that come out now wherein an author first commits all kinds of self-indulgent bad behavior (drugs, sex), then does something wildly exotic to "find" him or herself, then ends up blissfully fulfilled forever after, usually involving having lots of money. This author always tries to act as well as she can within the bounds of her personal integrity, she's more interested in the place she lives in and the people she lives with than "finding herself," and she doesn't become blissfully fulfilled and filthy rich at the end, just reasonably satisfied with the life she's had. That's real life, and it's inspiring to read about it from an author with so much honesty and clarity.
Landamath
Joyce Johnson pays an eloquent tribute to the two men she married in the fifties and early sixties. Both men, Jim Johnson (who died in a motorcycle crash and left Joyce a widow at 27) and Peter Pinchback were, in a sense, "failed" abstract expressionists whose work never was commercially successful. And both were temperamental men who frankly, sounded impossible to live with. Joyce gave her husbands both financial and emotional support, in addition to working full time as an editor and raising a son alone after her marriage with Pinchback ended. Johnson describes a rich artistic life in what now is a lost and faraway world--a grubby, but affordable Manhattan where even impoverished artists could casually move from the Bowery to the East Village or Soho in search of the perfect space. "In those days it was still possible to be gracefully poor in New York," she writes. From what's been written about the lives of artists like Pollack and deKooning, we know what it was like to be a successful painter in New York in the fifties. Johnson's book is valuable in another way; she chronicles what it was like to be part of the second wave of abstract expressionists. These artists were, by and large, ignored by dealers and critics and their fragile careers were dealt a final blow by the conceptual and Pop art movements.

Johnson writes that she was raised in a family of women, mostly without men, and that the emotional absence she experienced in both of her difficult marriages replicated the male absences of her childhood. Ironically, it's Joyce Johnson herself who has achieved the fame and recognition that so eluded both of her husbands. But the loving (and exasperated) portraits she paints of them here show that she is a powerful artist in her own right.