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Free eBook William Albert Allard: Five Decades download

by William Kittredge,William Albert Allard

Free eBook William Albert Allard: Five Decades download ISBN: 1426206372
Author: William Kittredge,William Albert Allard
Publisher: Focal Point; 1st edition (October 12, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: Photography and Video
Size MP3: 1324 mb
Size FLAC: 1641 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: txt doc docx mbr


Allard is one of my top five personal photographic heroes.

Allard is one of my top five personal photographic heroes. First has always been Ernst Haas, second Eliot Porter, and tying for third Allard, Cartier-Bresson, and, well, I have trouble deciding on this one. He has my vote for the best yist since W Eugene Smith. Allard came up in the 1960s and & when it was still possible for us of the Post-War Baby Boom Generation to find a handful of photographers to latch onto and follow through their careers. But there is no question about my top five, and Allard is one of them. 9 people found this helpful.

William Albert Allard (born in 1937) is an American documentary photographer. Allard was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota

William Albert Allard (born in 1937) is an American documentary photographer. Allard was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The son of a Swedish immigrant, he studied at the Minneapolis School of Fine Arts and the University of Minnesota with the hope of becoming a writer. Transferring to the University of Minnesota after only a year, he enrolled in the journalism program.

William Albert Allard: Five Decades: A Retrospective by. William Albert Allard, William Kittredge (Foreword). The Photographic Essay: William Albert Allard by. William Albert Allard, Russell Hart.

William Albert Allard. By William Albert Allard Foreword by William Kittredge. About William Albert Allard. This gorgeous gift book reveals nearly 50 years of photography by seasoned National Geographic photographer Bill Allard. Allard was a pioneer of color photography with a style that called for entering people’s homes and hearts; by winning their confidence he was able to capture off guard moments, and reveal the depth of human nature as never before seen in the pages of National Geographic.

3 great 2010 photo books. 3. William Albert Allard: Five Decades. This retrospective, with a foreword by Allard’s friend William Kittredge, contains some of Allard’s most notable images, along with a set of essays by Allard that serve as a kind of photographic diary. Glancing through Allard’s mysterious and telling images on the page is already a pleasure, but to read the adjoining text documenting his experiences with the photo, subject, and situation heightens the viewer’s experience. ISBN: 1426206372; This gorgeous gift book reveals 50 years of photography by seasoned National Geographic photographer Bill Allard. Allard was a pioneer of color photography with a style that called for entering people's homes and hearts; by winning their confidence he was able to capture "off guard" moments, and reveal the depth of human nature as never before seen in the pages of National Geographic.

William Albert Allard, William Kittredge. This gorgeous gift book reveals 50 years of photography by "National Geographic" photographer Bill Allard. Allard's style called for entering people's homes and hearts; by winning their confidence he was able to capture off guard moments, and reveal the depth of human nature as never before seen in the pages of "National Geographic".

THE SON OF A SWEDISH IMMIGRANT, William Albert Allard was born in 1937 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Allard has published five previous highly acclaimed books including his first, Vanishing Breed, of which the Associated Press said, "This is a classic. Allard is a photographer of people. Published in 1982,Vanishing Breed was nominated for The American Book Award for 1982, and was the winner of the Wrangler Western Heritage Award for Outstanding Western Art Book, 1983, and was awarded the Leica Medal of Excellence, 1983.

This gorgeous gift book reveals nearly 50 years of photography by seasoned National Geographic photographer Bill Allard. Allard was a pioneer of color photography with a style that called for entering people's homes and hearts; by winning their confidence he was able to capture "off guard" moments, and reveal the depth of human nature as never before seen in the pages of National Geographic. Always in search of "what is happening at the edges," his work reveals beauty, mystery, and a sense of adventure. Part photography retrospective and part personal memoir, this book paints a full picture —through images and narrative —of the life of a globe-trekking photographer over the past half century.
User reviews
Dagdardana
It is difficult to overrate this book. Among retrospectives, it is rare for the photographer and writer to be the same person. But Allard is one of those rare creative artists who are gifted not just in the field for which they are best known, but in other artistic competencies - skilled writing, visual design, and musicianship.

This is a very sensitive, human book. Its beauty in writing and images goes well without saying. Nothing less would be expected anyway.

This book summarizes until the last few chapters all of the stories we fans have awaited and enjoyed in National Geographic and in his books over the decades. The last too few chapters show some of his personal take. Would that there could have been more of these, of images that none of us has seen before.

Allard is one of my top five personal photographic heroes. First has always been Ernst Haas, second Eliot Porter, and tying for third Allard, Cartier-Bresson, and, well, I have trouble deciding on this one. He has my vote for the best photojournalist/essayist since W Eugene Smith. His work is seldom a collection of hit-and-move on images. Most of his articles and single subject books are visual and written stories where it is so obvious that he, as the photographer, has the trust, acceptance, and liking of the subjects in the image. The people in his images are not just geometrical and color visual elements, but are conveyors of the images' feel and story.

So many of his images over the years have bored into my mind as visual archetypes of certain human situations - probably more than any other favorite photographer of the human condition. While he gets and publishes once in a great while some shocking, gruesome content, what I remember more about his images is how many I'd love to have in our home. There is a gentleness and love of humanity that comes through in most of his images and in all of his stories. Few photographers achieve that quality. But when there is something to show of the dark side, he achieves the impact without the abrasiveness and breath-stopping qualities of some who specialize in the most down-and-out aspects of life.

He admits in his interviews that he lacks the analytical vocabulary to describe and evaluate the architecture of his images in analytical/technical terms. Many photographers I know are that way. But when he says "I see in color," it brings to mind people with cross sensory brain architecture who perceive across different stimuli in the sense of, say, Kandinski, who when hearing music, saw colors and shapes in his mind's eye. Others hear music according to what they are seeing. I think Allard is of that ilk, where the visual, written/verbal, and musical are all happening simultaneously inside his head. To get the images he does, it seems to me that something like that must be going on. This is purely speculation, but, d---, he is good.

If any reader of this review gets the chance to take one of his workshops, don't miss it. I had that privilege several years ago. I didn't shoot much that week, but I certainly enjoyed and was often awed by the work that the others came up with. After finally getting some time for him to look at some of my work, he made my entire photographic career, such as it is not, saying, "You use the frame well." It only took me twenty some years to get to that point.

I hope there are more books to come. One I'd like would be just his unpublished and personal work. Allard came up in the 1960s and `70s when it was still possible for us of the Post-War Baby Boom Generation to find a handful of photographers to latch onto and follow through their careers. Now there are so many, I don't have a sense of whom I'd choose from among the younger crowd to call a favorite. But there is no question about my top five, and Allard is one of them.
xander
A most interesting book encompassing Five Decades of Allard's life with great photographs and background stories to match.
An interesting side note is that the press runs of the book may be uneven as the photographs in my copy were perfectly reproduced while the photographs in a friend of mine's copy were a bit on the darker side, taking away from some of their nuance and appeal. A book worth having!
Lahorns Gods
This man is my artistic and literary hero - and I'm a 43-year master photographer. Allard's approach, and his articulate recount of who, what, where, when and why is the bible for any photojournalist. His book "The Photographic Essay" has more of his philosophy, and has been my text for teaching students how to hone their craft. "Five Decades" is a lovely picture book to which I go frequently for thought and inspiration.
MARK BEN FORD
Great quality and easy to follow retrospective of well known national geographic photographer. Congrats to the editors for selecting a representative and interesting body of work that seems to flow from on picture to another keeping one curious till the last page! Much better than portraits of America in my very amateurish oppinion.
Flathan
I met Mr. Allard several years ago, so to have a book of his work and to see all the different places he has covered is extra special.
Mildorah
An interesting autobiographical read from one of the great color photographers of the 20th century, filled with his best photographs.
Fast Lovebird
Bill Allard has influenced generations of photographers through his work in the National Geographic and this books shows why. He is a master of light and color and these images promise the passionate photographer a real treat for the eyes. Repeated viewing of these images and especially the insight he provides in his essays offers an advanced degree on what's involved in making a beautiful and impactful image. I own every monograph that he has released, but this is a true gem, a great testament to a fantastic career.
A few fellow photographers mentioned Allard so I had to look him her and I am glad I did. Awesome!