» » Looking at art

Free eBook Looking at art download

by David Piper,Christopher Cornford,Peter Owen

Free eBook Looking at art download ISBN: 0394540476
Author: David Piper,Christopher Cornford,Peter Owen
Publisher: Random House (1984)
Language: English
Pages: 256
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: Painting
Size MP3: 1251 mb
Size FLAC: 1589 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf docx rtf lrf


David Piper, Peter Owen.

Looking at Art: An Introduction to Enjoying the Great Paintings of the World by. David Piper. David Piper, Christopher White. David Piper, Peter Owen.

Город: Newport, WalesРабота: Abertillery Learning Community, Rugby d. .

Christopher Francis Cornford (9 February 1917 – 8 April 1993) was a British artist and writer. He was the son of Francis Cornford, and his wife Frances Cornford (née Darwin). Through his mother he was a great-grandson of the naturalist Charles Darwin. His elder brother was the poet, communist, and Spanish Civil War victim John Cornford. His son is Adam Cornford, British poet, librettist, and essayist.

A brief book that describes the basic Classical Greek proportions of the . Excellent information for those just looking to learn about making art at home. Watercolor Sketching for Travelers.

A brief book that describes the basic Classical Greek proportions of the human body for use as a reference for figure drawing. The Art of Figure Drawing. Learn about au premier coup ( in just one pass ) watercolor sketching from an expert.

Christopher Cornford. Christopher Francis Cornford (9 February 1917 – 8 April 1993) was a British artist and writer. He was the son of Francis Cornford, and his wife Frances Cornford (née Darwin)

Christopher Cornford. Christopher Francis Cornford was cremated on 19 April 1993 at Cambridge Crematorium. Christopher Cornford at Find a Grave.

Adam Francis Cornford was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the son of Christopher Cornford and .

Adam Francis Cornford was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the son of Christopher Cornford and a lineal descendant of naturalist Charles Darwin. Among his books are three collections of poetry: Shooting Scripts (Black Stone Press, 1978); Animations (City Lights Books, 1988) and Decision Forest (Pantograph Press, 1997). Cornford's most recent book of poetry is a collaboration with the printer and bookmaker Peter Rutledge Koch, Liber Ignis (2015), a serial documentary poem on the history of copper mining. The Pied Piper of Hamelin (libretto for children's opera based on the poem by Robert Browning, with composer Daniel Steven Crafts), 1992.

David Piper (Author). A fun look at Oxford, too, as well as its treasures.

Unbalanced country music fan, Andy Mowf, has been listening to his hair stylist instead of his psychiatrist. Andy, his stylist, and two other friends head into the woods, anticipating a light-hearted weekend of camping. Paula Kasper had dropped out of the Psychology program at the University of Texas in her junior year to open a hair salon south of Downtown Austin.

Looking At Art: An Introduction to Enjoying the Great Paintings of the World David Piper.

This volume contains four books in one: "Variations on Twelve Themes", "The Language of Painting", "Materials and Methods of Painting", and "Looking at Paintings." This invaluable reference for anybody interested in the arts is illustrated throughout with hundreds of full-color and black & white pictures.
User reviews
adventure time
This is a good intro to various types of art/artists. Some of the comments and opinions could be disputed. Worth buying.
Worla
Certain kinds of books, it seems, all too soon go out of print and become "unavailable." Why in the world would "Looking at Art: An Introduction to Enjoying the Great Paintings of the World" become a corpse, too, is beyond my understanding. Originally, it was the bulk of volume 1 of the "Random House Library of Painting and Sculpture" (also available, as a set or individual volumes, from independent sellers with Amazon).

There are many history of art books in print. I speak in amazement regarding print status because of the content and quality of this definitively representative book. "Looking at Art" approaches art differently from its history, although history is incorporated in the separate sections.

David Piper, the major contributor, sets up the book in four parts:
1. Variations on Twelve Themes (a sort of introduction to famous paintings of the world, with themes like the Human Face, Life and Leisure, Landscape, Still Life, Images of Divinity, the Inward Eye, and so on),

2. The Language of Paintings (space, perspective, line, pattern, texture, edge qualities, abstraction, etc.)

3. Materials and Methods of Painting (tempura, wall-painting, watercolor, gouache, oil, mixed media, and others, with each having subdivisions),

And now that the reader/viewer has background understanding, he/she is ready for "looking at art":
4. Looking at Paintings (famous paintings from around the world, e.g. "The Arnolfini Marriage" by Van Eyck, the Sistine Chapel Ceiling by Michelangelo, "The Ambassadors" by Holbein, etc.).

A small book would not do justice to the art contained, so the volume is 14 inches high and 10 inches wide (actually in fractions). The color reproduction is good with most of the paintings shown in color; some are shown in black and white, and in varying sizes (mostly for lay-out purposes).

The accompanying essays for each section and subsection are outstanding. Here is an excerpt from the Subsection "The Inward Eye" concerning Rothko's "Black on Maroon, 1958" (78-79). Rothko's canvas's are huge; this one is 12 feet wide. "Nebulous, sombrely glowing, the colour gives the impression that the paint is generating its own light, as in the embers of a fire" writes Piper.

One example of examination of a masterpiece is Caravaggio's "The Conversion of Paul, 1600-01." This is what Piper says in a condensed summary: "The picture is a masterpiece of simple, forcefully stark, concentrated drama. The unbalanced composition, in which the massive, unmoved figure of the horse fills almost the entire canvas, makes all the more emphatic the prostrate Saul's shock. He falls back thunderstruck almost out of the picture frame, involving the viewer as witness" (174).

In the main essay, Piper writes: "The source of light is not shown; but the violent, even awkward foreshortening of the figure hurled down expresses an impact of huge energy, and the outflung arms embroil the whole in the vortex of a blinding miracle" (174). I love writing like that!

This book is listed several times on Amazon, but I selected this particular entry because several sellers are listed and most of their prices are right. "Looking at Art" is a book to keep handy, to pick up at spare moments to read, look, learn, and in doing so, expand your world. Highly recommended!