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Free eBook Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists download

by John Maeda,Casey Reas

Free eBook Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists download ISBN: 0262182629
Author: John Maeda,Casey Reas
Publisher: The MIT Press (August 17, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 712
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: Other Media
Size MP3: 1220 mb
Size FLAC: 1355 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: azw lrf txt mbr


With Processing, Casey Reas and Ben Fry have opened up the world of programming to artists and designers in a manner that inspires playfulness and creativity with code

With Processing, Casey Reas and Ben Fry have opened up the world of programming to artists and designers in a manner that inspires playfulness and creativity with code. Red Burns, Chair and Arts Professor, Interactive Telecommunications Program, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. Casey Reas is Professor of Design Media Arts at UCLA and coauthor of Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists (MIT Press, 2007).

This book is an introduction to the concepts of computer programming within the context of the visual arts. It offers a comprehensive reference and text for Processing (ww. rocessing. The ideas in Processing have been tested in classrooms, workshops, and arts institutions, including UCLA, Carnegie Mellon, New York University, and Harvard University

556 Code Hernando Barragán and Casey Reas 561 Resources 633 Electronics in the arts 635 Electricity 563 Extension 4: Network.

Processing : a programming handbook for visual designers and artists, Casey Reas & Ben Fry ; foreword by John Maeda. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-262-18262-1 (hardcover : alk. paper) 1. Computer programming. 556 Code Hernando Barragán and Casey Reas 561 Resources 633 Electronics in the arts 635 Electricity 563 Extension 4: Network.

Start by marking Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Jul 27, 2009 Ampaire rated it it was amazing.

Ebooks for developing software. Books/Processing - A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists-MIT Press-200709. larrypham Software Engineer Books ca3f3c4 Dec 5, 2014.

When designers and artists learn the basics of writing software, they develop a new form of literacy that enables . This book introduces this new literacy by teaching computer programming within the context of the visual arts.

When designers and artists learn the basics of writing software, they develop a new form of literacy that enables them to create new media for the present, and to imagine future media that are beyond the capacities of current software tools. rocessing

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Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Casey Reas, Ben Fry. Category: Компьютеры, Программирование. 3 Mb. Casey Reas, Ben Fry, John Maeda. 1. 1 Mb. Processing : a programming handbook for visual designers and artists. Category: Computer science.

I've grappled with many programming books over the years in an effort to teach myself programming and none come close to Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists. Casey Reas and Ben Fry are to be congratulated on two counts.

come close to Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers. called Processing, which is a companion to the book so to speak. For those artists who use.

Ben Fry. Foreword by John Maeda. Written by Processing's cofounders, the book offers a definitive reference for students and professionals. When designers and artists learn the basics of writing software, they develop a new form of literacy that enables them to create new media for the present, and to imagine future media that are beyond the capacities of current software tools.

It has been more than twenty years since desktop publishing reinvented design, and it's clear that there is a growing need for designers and artists to learn programming skills to fill the widening gap between their ideas and the capability of their purchased software. This book is an introduction to the concepts of computer programming within the context of the visual arts. It offers a comprehensive reference and text for Processing (www.processing.org), an open-source programming language that can be used by students, artists, designers, architects, researchers, and anyone who wants to program images, animation, and interactivity. The ideas in Processing have been tested in classrooms, workshops, and arts institutions, including UCLA, Carnegie Mellon, New York University, and Harvard University. Tutorial units make up the bulk of the book and introduce the syntax and concepts of software (including variables, functions, and object-oriented programming), cover such topics as photography and drawing in relation to software, and feature many short, prototypical example programs with related images and explanations. More advanced professional projects from such domains as animation, performance, and typography are discussed in interviews with their creators. "Extensions" present concise introductions to further areas of investigation, including computer vision, sound, and electronics. Appendixes, references to additional material, and a glossary contain additional technical details. Processing can be used by reading each unit in order, or by following each category from the beginning of the book to the end. The Processing software and all of the code presented can be downloaded and run for future exploration.Includes essays by Alexander R. Galloway, Golan Levin, R. Luke DuBois, Simon Greenwold, Francis Li, and Hernando Barragán and interviews with Jared Tarbell, Martin Wattenberg, James Paterson, Erik van Blockland, Ed Burton, Josh On, Jürg Lehni, Auriea Harvey and Michaël Samyn, Mathew Cullen and Grady Hall, Bob Sabiston, Jennifer Steinkamp, Ruth Jarman and Joseph Gerhardt, Sue Costabile, Chris Csikszentmihályi, Golan Levin and Zachary Lieberman, and Mark Hansen.Casey Reas is Associate Professor in the Design Media Arts Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. Ben Fry is Nierenburg Chair of Design in the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, 2006-2007.

User reviews
Saithinin
My son decided he wanted to move up from Logo so we introduced him to processing. This book was purchased along with Getting Started with Processing and Processing: Creative Coding and Generative Art.

This book was added to our collection specifically because it takes a more academic, detailed and complex approach, attempting to create a more serious introduction to software development through the lens of processing.

For my son, once he was able to fluently move through processing and create wonderful and engaging sketches quickly this became his go to book for deepening his applications and understanding of what is possible.

Highly recommended but it is a little more advanced, but don't let that stop you, its so much fun you will rise up to the challenge and be a better processing developer for it!
CONVERSE
This is an excellent introduction to Processing by the creators of the language. It is extremely well-written and a pleasure to read. It may also be the only programming book I've purchased (and I've purchased a lot of them) free of coding errors.
Fonceiah
This book is, quite simply, a godsend. If you are an artist that enjoys tinkering with all things technological (especially an artist that enjoyed mathematics or beating up your computer in high school lab class) than it's certainly for you. If, on the other hand, you are the type of person that hopes to breeze though this and start applying "techie things" to your video art, then you are in for a let-down...it IS a bit tough for someone that has never played with a computer programming language. No way around it, you're going to have to WORK!!

But, that's the thing. You're supposed to work, massage, twist, graft, apply, subtract and otherwise mangle these functions and commands until they do some (random, unexpected) beautiful thing. This is exactly what the authors want you to do. Take their simple equations and use your imagination to change them up a bit and make your own.

And, a big plus is how the whole book is structured. It starts with simple enough topics and progressively increases in difficulty, BUT, and here is the stroke of genius for artsy types, it does so by switching the topics here and there from shapes, to type, to math, to random, to trig, to type again, back to shapes...etc. So, you see, it's structured (if you read from cover to cover in a linear fashion) in a way that will NOT bore the reader in any way. It's as if Reas and Fry knew that most of us artsy types were (completely and hopelessly) ADHD and needed this kind of variety to keep our interest (lord knows they probably wish they did, coming from artistic backgrounds before entering MIT as grads). And, as an added bonus, if you are the kind of person that likes the topics all neatly together, there is a second topical index behind the main index so you can jump through the book by topic.

In closing, Reas and Fry have done us "new media" types a great service by developing a trimmed-down form of Java programming so that we don't have to do the heavy work and learn full-blown Java or C++ on our own (though, after using this language, the hope is that it WILL get us "artsies" to learn those higher level languages and make genre-smashing art). So, get going!

P.S. The only thing I wish this book had were MORE Exercises at the end of each topic. Or, a workbook that had more problems to solve, like my old Calculus text that had 30 problems after each section. Guys, could we, just maybe, extend the problem sets in a future edition, from three to maybe 10? It would be much appreciated! :)
Frlas
As a high school physics teacher with a lot of advanced students, I've been trying to work a bit of computer programming into the course over the last few years. I always wanted to do graphics programming with the students in order to help them visualize and simulate systems, because the pictures produced are a lot prettier and more rewarding than just the formulas on their own, but the languages I tried were just too difficult to teach from scratch in the time we had. Processing seems to be just what I'm looking for: it's free so the kids can download it themselves, and it really doesn't take much to produce stunning graphics. Now I would NOT recommend the book to someone with no programming experience at all - the emphasis of the book is clearly (and rightly) on how to get up to speed making images, not on what a variable is. That said, this book is a terrific resource for me; anyone with a basic programming course under their belt ought to have no trouble making sense of Processing's syntax, and the power of the language is phenomenal. The authors have done a fine job of both explaining the use of the Processing language, and showing off what it can do with all the examples. Processing is letting me do what I always wanted to do with a computer - make stunning graphics from mathematical information - at a level high school students can understand. If you are at all interested in Processing, download the free software and go here next.
Gtonydne
This is a great text, from the authors of the software itself. I'm only through the first hundred pages or so, but it's a fairly well-presented volume of information split into easily digested chapters, on everything from the command structure for creating graphics to the math that governs such efforts. The authors cover not only the rationale behind their own programming language, but also touch on the thinking behind digital graphic and artworks as a whole...

While the chapters are a little scattered for the linear reader (e.g., certain of the mathematical function chapters are broken and split into chapters that would flow a little better with no break between them), the authors are fairly clear in their intro and table of contents that the text is meant to be read and digested in a variety of ways, linear being only one method.

There are a few problems with the explanations of some of the syntax and command structure, but overall, the book is a sound investment for a newby like myself, who hasn't visited programming in a number of years, and needs a primer/refresher, as well as a source for the more advanced coding artist. I recommend the book without reservation.
Mikale
Very well written with more explanation on the language than other books I've read. Highly recommended.
Sironynyr
Good for use with a class, but unless you really play around with the code examples it's a reference book. And that's fine, because you have to apply code to learn it anyway.