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Free eBook Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock download

by Jim DeRogatis

Free eBook Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock download ISBN: 0634055488
Author: Jim DeRogatis
Publisher: HAL LEONARD CORPORATION (December 1, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 656
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: Music
Size MP3: 1491 mb
Size FLAC: 1312 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: lit docx lrf azw


Turn On Your Mind is an attempt to connect the dots from the very first groups who turned on, tuned in, and dropped out, to such new-millennial .

Turn On Your Mind is an attempt to connect the dots from the very first groups who turned on, tuned in, and dropped out, to such new-millennial practitioners as Wilco, the Elephant 6 bands, Moby, the Super Furry Animals, and the so-called "stoner-rock" and "ork-pop" scenes.

The history books tell us the �Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of. .

The history books tell us the �Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock� is a history and critical examination of rock's most inventive genre. I very much liked the fact that DeRogatis didn't stick with the traditional sense of what psychedelic rock is in this book. Instead he places it in a much broader context and draws lines tot other genres and bands that would never have been labelled psychedelic rock otherwise (even U2!). Jim DeRogatis is an associate professor of instruction at Columbia College Chicago and the host, with Greg Kot, of the nationally syndicated public radio show Sound Opinions.

Jim DeRogatis (born September 2, 1964) is an American music critic and co-host . Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock, Hal Leonard Publishing Co, 2003

Jim DeRogatis (born September 2, 1964) is an American music critic and co-host of Sound Opinions. DeRogatis has written articles for magazines such as Spin, Guitar World and Modern Drummer, and for fifteen years was the pop music critic for the Chicago Sun-Times Bibliography. Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock, Hal Leonard Publishing Co, 2003. Kill Your Idols: A New Generation of Rock Writers Reconsiders the Classics, Da Capo Press, 2004.

The book's title takes it's moniker from the omnipresent catch-phrase, setting the tone for a drug-induced rollercoaster of musicians centering around The Beach Boys, The Beatles, Brian Eno, Pink Floyd, and The Rolling Stones

Whether or not psychedelic drugs played a role (and as many musicians say they've used them as not), psychedelic rock has consistently charted brave new worlds that exist only in the space between the headphones.

Whether or not psychedelic drugs played a role (and as many musicians say they've used them as not), psychedelic rock has consistently charted brave new worlds that exist only in the space between the headphones.

DeRogatis’s credentials for re-tackling this ground are decent. Lengthy, exhaustive and absorbing, Turn On Your Mind is an important book, but more for his knowledge than theories. Hal Leonard ISBN 9780634055485. In 1996 his Kaleidoscope Eyes charted his idea of psychedelic music from the 60s to the 90s with wit and style.

Associate Professor, Columbia College. Co-host, Sound Opinions.

The history books tell us the music's high point was the Haight-Ashbury scene of 1967 but the genre didn't start in San Francisco and its evolution didn't end with the Summer of Love.

James "Jim" DeRogatis es un periodista y crítico de música estadounidense. Turn On Your Mind : Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock, Hal Leonard Publishing Co, 2003. DeRogatis ha escrito artículos para revistas como Spin, Guitar World y Modern Drummer, y fue el crítico de música de Chicago Sun-Times durante quince años. Es, también, co-presentador del talk show de música rock Sound Opinions, que se emite en la emisora Chicago Public Radio. Staring at Sound: The True Story of Oklahoma’s Fabulous The Flaming Lips, Broadway Books, 2006.

(Book). Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock is a history and critical examination of rock's most inventive genre. Whether or not psychedelic drugs played a role (and as many musicians say they've used them as not), psychedelic rock has consistently charted brave new worlds that exist only in the space between the headphones. The history books tell us the music's high point was the Haight-Ashbury scene of 1967, but the genre didn't start in San Francisco, and its evolution didn't end with the Summer of Love. A line can be drawn from the hypnotic drones of the Velvet Underground to the disorienting swirl of My Bloody Valentine; from the artful experiments of the Beatles' Revolver to the flowing, otherworldly samples of rappers P.M. Dawn; from the dementia of the 13th Floor Elevators to the grungy lunacy of the Flaming Lips; and from the sounds and sights at Ken Kesey's '60s Acid Tests to those at present-day raves. Turn On Your Mind is an attempt to connect the dots from the very first groups who turned on, tuned in, and dropped out, to such new-millennial practitioners as Wilco, the Elephant 6 bands, Moby, the Super Furry Animals, and the so-called "stoner-rock" and "ork-pop" scenes.
User reviews
Yellow Judge
it's written ok... loved jim's flaming lips bio, but this reads more like a list of albums to check out, loosely put together by genre. paragraph or two about a band and then it moves on. oh well. not horrible. not horribly insightful either.
Anayalore
Top music critic Jim DeRogatis does an outstanding job with a very difficult topic. As the manager of the Psychedelic 100 website I can attest to the fact that trying to identify what exactly makes a piece of music 'psychedelic' is not always an easy thing. But DeRogatis does not claim to write definitively -- he simply states a very well-informed point of view that is as open-ended and subject to healthy debate as the music about which he writes.

The "Ultimate Psychedelic Rock Library" appendix is a handy reference to the 189 albums DeRogatis considers to be the cream of the crop. Those with an eye on the Amazon stars should note that most negative reviews listed here focus on the fact that the book is simply an update of an earlier edition published under another title. In short, if you have Kaleidoscope Eyes you probably don't need this unless you are a rabid completist. With that in mind, this book certainly deserves much better than the three stars it was averaging at the time of writing this review.
EXIBUZYW
I didn't realize this is just a slightly updated version of Kaleidoscope Eyes,which Derogatis published,and I purchased,in 1996.The book itself is great,but I wouldn't have bought it a second time if i'd known it had been the same book that was simply re-titled.
Domarivip
Jim DeRogatis presents to the public his exhaustively researched book on the roots of psychedelic rock, and his ensuing opinions and considerations on the most influential psychedelic records of all time. The book's title takes it's moniker from the omnipresent catch-phrase, setting the tone for a drug-induced rollercoaster of musicians centering around The Beach Boys, The Beatles, Brian Eno, Pink Floyd, and The Rolling Stones. "Turn On Your Mind" focuses on Psychedelia's inception the 60's, and shows the bridges and seeping transitions into the Indy rock, Emo, and the roots of the Rave scene. Despite spending time covering the British influence and the inner workings of many smaller bands, the tome is effectively a 600-page CD review laden with top ten "most psychedelic" lists. DeRogatis kaleidoscopically jumps from artist to artist doing a thorough job of following up on all of his tangents; explaining why everything happened, who dropped who's acid, and what band both Lemmy of Mötörhead and Sci-Fi writer Michael Moorcock both fronted. DeRogatis is a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, and is also is the author of the meticulously researched and Romilar-laden "Let It Blurt: The Life and Times of Lester Bangs, America's Greatest Rock Journalist."
Sironynyr
By blurring psychedelic with the avant/garde and progressive, DeRogatis loses the focus needed to look through the kaleidoscope.

Perhaps a furthur printing/revision should be under yet another new title. Like, "Just Plain Weird Music."

A bit of advice can be heeded from Flaming Lips' booking agent/manager/metor/brains, Michele....

~It's hypocritical/impossible to sing/write about the drug experience (esp. psychedelics) if one doesn't actually do them.~

There does seem to be some phoniness behind the reactionary, knee-jerk historical revisionism riddling the book.

Like an au currant indie-rock hipster faking disinterest in the rock stars of the 60's, DeRogatis doth protest too much.

Uptight, ya' know..maaaaaan?
Dordred
Forty Years of Psychedelic Music..I don't think so. I admit that I did not read the whole book, I lost interest after looking at the list of "must have" records. Putting the Beach Boys in the same list as Jimi Hendrix did not compute in my mind. However, leaving Jefferson Airplane "After Bathing at Baxter's" and Blue Cheer "Vincibus Eruptom" off the list told me the writer needs to be re-indoctrinated to what is and what isn't psychedelic.
Saberblade
This is a nice reference work, with lots of useful information collected in one place. But don't make the mistake of thinking that, just because it's 600 pages, it's definitive. For instance, the Residents don't even rate a mention. Not one word. Nor do the Cramps, even though shameless Cramps imitators the Von Bondies rate a line. Camper Van Beethoven are mentioned once, but only in the context that they were David Lowery of Cracker's previous band. Cracker? CVB's third album is one of the all-time greatest psych albums of all time, even if only for the insane cover of "Interstellar Overdrive" featuring Eugene Chadbourne (who also doesn't rate a mention, though he has done at least two double albums with the letters LSD in the title.) And REM is only mentioned in passing, as a "one-hit wonder." What could be trippier than _Murmur_? I bought the previous version of this book when it came out, and was hoping that some of the glaring ommission had been rectified in this expanded edition, but no. There are some factual errors and ommissions, too. You'd think that DeRogatis would have had time to fact-check a little more. And, though I pretty much agree with his negative assessment of Grateful Dead (and their fans,) two chapters devoted to how much he dislikes them is a little much.
This is a must read for all interested in psychedelic rock. It is a solid book for reference and is a very interesting read, with Deragotis' style easy to digest. He does shy away from the Grateful Deads and Jimi Hendrixs in favor of the 13th floor Elevators and the Flaming Lips, which is a good thing. This is, by no means, defintive, but how could a book about a genre so hell-bent on origionality and obscurity be definitive? It is still a very solid pick-up for beginners to the genre.