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Free eBook Dreams That Money Can Buy: The Tragic Life of Libby Holman download

by Jon Bradshaw

Free eBook Dreams That Money Can Buy: The Tragic Life of Libby Holman download ISBN: 0688011586
Author: Jon Bradshaw
Publisher: William Morrow & Co; 1st edition (March 1, 1985)
Language: English
Pages: 431
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: Music
Size MP3: 1289 mb
Size FLAC: 1722 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: lrf txt mobi rtf


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Elizabeth Lloyd Holzman, best known as Libby Holman (May 23, 1904 .

Elizabeth Lloyd Holzman, best known as Libby Holman (May 23, 1904 – June 18, 1971), was an American singer and actress who also achieved notoriety for her complex and unconventional personal life. 1 Early life Personal life.

libby holman's name was given a recent go around when demi moore was looking for a good strong vehicle. i would like to see this fine book be the basis for a film bio of holman. she had been two go-arounds prior by film (more or less) with 1935's 'reckless', starring jean harlow and 'written on the wind', which brought dorothy malone an oscar for one of the most hysterical performances given by. a female. Recently Viewed and Featured. Successful Management by Objectives: An Action Manual (Spectrum Book ; S480)

I wondered just who this Libby Holman was, apart from her connection to Clift

I wondered just who this Libby Holman was, apart from her connection to Clift. I’d actually read it those many years ago, but I’d forgotten most of what I’d read. So I picked it up once again, and it was a revelation. The subtitle tells it all. Libby Holman was a young woman who made a big splash on Broadway in the 1920s as a torch singer. Then she married an heir to the Reynolds Tobacco fortune.

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Life in the United Kingdom Handbook The Home Office by Great Britain (Paperback, 2013). Jon Scieszka Picture Book Hardback Children's & Young Adults' Books in English.

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the tragic life of Libby Holman.

A study of the life of torch singer and Broadway star Libby Holman, set against the backdrop of the notorious Cafe Society of the 1920's, details the scandals and tragedies of her life, her bisexual love affairs, and her mysterious death
User reviews
Mall
The life of Libby Holman is for all intensive purposes the story of the "jazz age"--loose morals, fast money,and too much booze...America coming of age in the 1920's and the failure of the government attempting to legislate morality. Libby led her life the way she wanted without really being concerned with what anyone else thought--sex with youngsters, oldsters and the gender of which played no role whatsoever...it was the moment and only the moment that moved her. But don;t think she was alone--it was the age of Mae West, Tallulah Bankhead,,Vilma Banky, Sarah Bernhardt and many others that fell into the same category..hedonistic ladies of the early 20's.

The book was really well written and moved along with great speed--always wondering what to hell she was going to do next...When next I teach a course on America in the Jazz Age--you can bet this book will be required reading...and will have no trouble getting students to read it either...As a social history of America--it will be hard dto find any volume that says more for the age than does Jon Bradshaws' Libby Holman. Happy Reading...
TheMoonix
this tragic story about the wealthy, does not set them apart from the commoners...all can have horrible things happen.
Lost Python
Very interesting book with a North Carolina connection. I was not aware of the death of Smith Reynolds and the part Reynolda had. If you are in to NC history, this is a good read. Today's stars have nothing on those from the past.
Ylonean
I enjoyed it..
Adaly
I enjoyed it..
IWAS
A few months ago, I read a biography of Montgomery Clift for the second time, the first being in the mid-1980s. In that book, his close relationship with Libby Holman was spoken of. I wondered just who this Libby Holman was, apart from her connection to Clift. And then I remembered that when I had read the Clift bio the first time, I’d also purchased Jon Bradshaw’s Dreams That Money Can Buy, The Tragic Life of Libby Holman. I’d actually read it those many years ago, but I’d forgotten most of what I’d read. So I picked it up once again, and it was a revelation. The subtitle tells it all. Libby Holman was a young woman who made a big splash on Broadway in the 1920s as a torch singer. Then she married an heir to the Reynolds Tobacco fortune. Upon his death, she became a very rich woman. But that death was always clouded in mystery: Was it suicide? Was it accidental? Did his wife kill him? Those questions are never answered in this book, but asking them sets us up for what’s to come. Holman’s life was filled with death and tragedy, but, despite her deep depressions, she managed a long life. She was someone I’d liked to have known. She could be reckless at times; she could be Puritanical at times. But through her highs and lows, she remained mostly exuberant. Her friends—some of the most radiant stars of the times—loved her and stood by her, even when she did not stand by them. She weathered three unhappy marriages, had numerous affairs with both men and women (Clift among them,) birthed one child, and raised two others, never allowing anyone to say they were adopted even though that was exactly the truth. She gave lavish parties, maintained three residences, gave generous gifts to her friends, and managed to cut ties with long-time friends she felt had wronged her. She supported equal rights, was a great friend of Martin Luther King, Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King, gave generously to human rights causes, and left a large chunk of her estate to Boston University. Her own death remains a mystery. Labeled a suicide, Bradshaw makes a good case that it certainly could not have been that. He intimates that her then current husband may have murdered her. But that’s something we’ll never know (unless something new has been found since this book was published almost thirty years ago.) And knowing is not important. What this book proves is that the world was richer because Libby Holman was in it.
Knights from Bernin
I'm really surprised this biography only has one customer review. Perhaps that's because it was published a couple of decades ago, but since the subject, Libby Holman, lived her life mostly in the first half of the 20th century, you're basically reading history. I had never heard of her at the time I read the book and bought it just because it looked interesting. It didn't disappoint.

Apparently Libby Holman was well-known and quite scandalous in her day. When still very young, she was a flamboyant stage star, singer and vamp who was pursued by all manner of rich "stage door johnnies", and had both a male heir to the Reynolds tobacco fortune and a female heiress who dresses as a man in love with her. She marries the young male heir (who flies a plane and has a flair for suicidal melodrama), goes to live in his fancy Southern mansion out in the middle of nowhere, and bears a son. When her wealthy young husband turns up dead after a wild houseparty, Libby and his best friend - who is supposedly also Libby's lover - are indicted for his murder and a major scandal ensues. Finally cleared (but maybe only due to lack of evidence), Libby goes off to raise her son with her cross-dressing girlfriend. The book up to this point would make a wonderful Southern Gothic miniseries.

Later on, Libby develops an interracial blues act with an African-American musical accompanist and takes her show on the road, challenging the segregation of the time. She also spends a lot of time hanging out with Tallulah Bankhead and dating handsome Hollywood hunks including Montgomery Clift, but unfortunately most if not all of the fellows she gets involved with meet some sad end, which starts to wear on her after a while and make her wonder if she's bad luck. For the big finish, her son, now college-aged decides to climb a mountain without the proper equipment and unsurprisingly falls off and dies, putting the finishing touch on his mother's transformation into a tragic figure. In a final ironic twist, when Libby herself is found dead in the late 60s, questions remain about whether her death is suicide or murder, just as those same questions arose with respect to her dead first husband.

It's pretty amazing to me, as well as sad, that someone who was as famous as Libby apparently was about 80 years ago would be relatively little known today. Though not conventionally beautiful, at least by modern standards, she definitely had a way about her. Although the book finishes on a down note, Libby is a strong, sexy and wisecracking woman through most of the events preceding her son's death. If you like historical biographies like "Zelda", you'll like this book.