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Free eBook Jimi Hendrix and the Making of Are You Experienced (The Vinyl Frontier series) download

by Sean Egan

Free eBook Jimi Hendrix and the Making of Are You Experienced (The Vinyl Frontier series) download ISBN: 1556524714
Author: Sean Egan
Publisher: Chicago Review Press (September 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 192
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: Music
Size MP3: 1872 mb
Size FLAC: 1362 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: doc mobi lrf mbr


This book was written by Sean Egan and was published in 2002 by A Capppella books as part of a series . Once we are brought to the recordings made in late '66 and '67 that became singles and album tracks for AYE, the mostly chronological approach is effective.

This book was written by Sean Egan and was published in 2002 by A Capppella books as part of a series called "Vinyl Frontier". I've had it a while and initially just thumbed through it for flavor, then recently went through it cover to cover. This fleshes out the differences between the British Track and US Reprise releases effectively, even if Egan's opinions might not agree perfectly with mine.

This book by Sean Egan is about Jimmie Hendrix’s early life and how he became into making music, and how exactly .

This book by Sean Egan is about Jimmie Hendrix’s early life and how he became into making music, and how exactly he came up with each song for his album are you experienced. Personally the book wasn’t bad it’s just that I’m not the biggest Hendrix fan so I didn’t care to learn about songs I didn’t know/like. I thought this book was a very good book because of how good it explains and shows the making of Jimi Hendrix first album and how it talked about his recording sessions in the studio and how he and his studio came up with basically a new type of sound. I would recommend reading this book if your remotely interested with Jimi Hendrix or how he made his music.

I DON'T THINK THAT JIMI WOULD ever have made it in America had he not come here first and formed the Experience.

Are You Experienced is the debut studio album by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Released in 1967, the LP was an immediate critical and commercial success, and it is widely regarded as one of the greatest debuts in the history of rock music

Are You Experienced is the debut studio album by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Released in 1967, the LP was an immediate critical and commercial success, and it is widely regarded as one of the greatest debuts in the history of rock music. The album features Jimi Hendrix's innovative approach to songwriting and electric guitar playing which soon established a new direction in psychedelic and hard rock music.

Jimi Hendrix and the Making of Are You Experienced: Updated and Expanded. Scuse Me While I Kiss the Sky: Jimi Hendrix: Voodoo Child. p. 179. ISBN 978-0954575052. 189. ISBN 978-0743274012.

The album’s psychedelic title track, which author Sean Egan described as impressionistic in his book Jimi Hendrix and the Making of Are You Experienced, featured the post-modern soundscapes of backwards guitar and drums that pre-date scratching by 10 years

The album’s psychedelic title track, which author Sean Egan described as impressionistic in his book Jimi Hendrix and the Making of Are You Experienced, featured the post-modern soundscapes of backwards guitar and drums that pre-date scratching by 10 years. Are You Experienced?" Track Info. Written By Jimi Hendrix. Production Chas Chandler. Label Track Records & Reprise Records. Lead Vocals Jimi Hendrix.

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Are You Experienced? The Jimi Hendrix Experience Reprise (1967) Album Inducted 1999

Are You Experienced? The Jimi Hendrix Experience Reprise (1967) Album Inducted 1999. As told to Alan di Perna). By January 1967, when we started work on Are You Experienced?, Jimi Hendrix had already had a run of successful singles in the UK with "Hey Joe," "Purple Haze" and "The Wind Cries Mary. A lot of that work, as well as some other tracks, had been recorded at De Lane Lea Studios in London, but Jimi and the Experience had to get out of there because there was a bank above the studio and they couldn't play loud.

The story of how the Jimi Hendrix Experience's first album, Are You Experienced, was made is even more astonishing than the record itself, and this book tells it all. With its finely crafted songwriting, breathtaking guitar playing, and the sheer power of the group, Are You Experienced was unlike anything heard before and paved the way for generations of rock to come. But rather than the result of a concentrated period of hard work, the album was recorded in short sessions between gigs, in radically different studios; moreover, Hendrix first showed most of the songs to the other band members on the day of recording, with no prior rehearsals. Here is the whole story, based on extensive interviews, along with accounts of all the album's influences-Jimi's love affair with Kathy Etchingham, the band's perennially penniless state, the gigs they had to perform to keep themselves afloat, and the growing awareness among British musicians that Jimi Hendrix was perhaps rock's greatest guitarist.
User reviews
Stan
Sean's assessment of this album's individual tracks is odd: He overhypes minor tracks such as Can You See Me and exhorts readers to "be suspicious of Hendrix fans that dismiss the likes of 'Remember," which is rather silly given that Mitch Mitchell admitted the song was filler and thus never played live. Sean also believes that the album shouldn't have closed with the epic "Are You Experienced" instead of something "with more of an impact." Again, laughable. He complains about the "corporate arrogance and philistinism" of American record companies when discussing the running order and spelling of the songs on the US release, yet remains completely silent about the despicably sexist album cover choice Track records made for the Electric Ladyland cover without Jimi's input, which was very specific and far more tasteful. Sean does discuss Electric Ladyland in this book, so this omission is glaring given his flag waving against record companies for their dismissive attitude toward artistic intent. A double standard to say the least.
Unirtay
This book was written by Sean Egan and was published in 2002 by A Capppella books as part of a series called "Vinyl Frontier". I've had it a while and initially just thumbed through it for flavor, then recently went through it cover to cover.
I found this book to a bit paradoxical at times, but with enough merit to recommend its purchase to those into Jimi's music or the history of rock in general. Egan conducted numerous interviews that I haven't found published anywhere previous to this book and the key there is he asked some fresh questions that gave answers to similar questions I've had for some time. For example, Lonnie Youngblood gives interesting perspectve on Jimi the musician in the pre-Experience days. Likewise, the comments by Linda Keith on those exciting days the cusp of Jimi's discovery are illuminating.
Historical perspective is generally excellent, although not exhaustive. This book focuses on AYE and does not bother with historical trivia that does not bear on this album in some direct manner. Once we are brought to the recordings made in late '66 and '67 that became singles and album tracks for AYE, the mostly chronological approach is effective. This fleshes out the differences between the British Track and US Reprise releases effectively, even if Egan's opinions might not agree perfectly with mine.
The technological aspects of these recordings are given some discussion, but not necessarily an exhaustive one from a technotweak perspective. However, the discussion of how the technology was used as a musical research tool and its final effect on the music was given excellent treatment. For example, the discussion of 3rd Stone from the Sun was very entertaining. I particularly enjoyed his mention of people playing their album at 78 rpm to flesh out the vocals that were patched in at half speed. See, people were mining for hidden snippets back there in real time and I'm not the only one to say so!
Now for the more confusing aspects: The back cover starts by talking about albums that are so extrordinary that they influence generations of inspiring artists, yada, yada. Yes, AYE certainly fits that mold, maybe even shatters it to bits requiring a remolding job for all that follow. The problem comes when one reads the last chapter, titled: "The Songs". Herein we are treated to what I consider to be overly harsh criticisms of too many of these songs - such that I'm surprised that Egan considers AYE to be worthy of classic status. Three of the British Track LP tracks, I Don't Live Today, 3rd Stone From The Sun and Are You Experienced receive criticisms that I disagree with, and do so strongly. Those are three of my all-time favorites! Don't get me wrong - I enjoy diversity and respect the opinions of others regardless of how flawed they in
fact are, but this last chapter left me wondering if Egan might have been in a bit of a rush to finish the project off? His writing here is on average less colorful and insightful than the rest of the book and due to the subject matter - the music itself - it sticks out like a sore thumb. But I still strongly recommend this book, without reservation.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
I loved the fresh interview materials and the factual sleuthing the author (Sean Egan) has added to the Hendrix story, and especially towards the time and setting leading up to and around Hendrix's recording of Are You Experienced in London, Great Britain in 1966-1967.

The author is less successful when he infuses his own opinion about what works or doesn't work with Hendrix's material. For instance, he would have it that Hendrix would have sung 'ain't sang a tune all WEEK' instead of Day, just to have it vaguely rhyme with 'sang so sweet' from an earlier line... (Even if 'sweet' and 'week' rhymed, that doesn't mean it's a reason to institute it in a song. Let's have Da Vinci go back and add a dog to the last supper, why don't we; wouldn't there be a dog hanging round such a feast for scraps?) As another reviewer has noted, Egan finds fault with songs such as 'I Don't Live Today', 'Third Stone From the Sun' and the song 'Are You Experienced', leading me to belive that while Egan knows it's an 'important album', that doesn't neccessarily equate with him being able to tune into the overall greatness of its individual parts.

So while the Egan's own opinions set the book back a shade, one can't discount his effort in getting the research together for this book. The interview material with people who knew and worked with Hendrix is very valuable.

(Maybe Egan needs to 'take' something for a re-listen!).
Painwind
Very detailed. Very well written. It might be worth 5 stars but I don't know enough to say just how accurate this book is. No filler. Sean Egan has written many other excellent books.
Mash
Great reference book... A must for any Jimi Hendrix fan who wants a deeper knowledge of Jimi's first months in London, at the recording studios.