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Free eBook Listening to the Future: The Time of Progressive Rock, 1968-1978 download

by Bill Martin Jr.

Free eBook Listening to the Future: The Time of Progressive Rock, 1968-1978 download ISBN: 081269368X
Author: Bill Martin Jr.
Publisher: Open Court (December 30, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 256
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: Music
Size MP3: 1171 mb
Size FLAC: 1602 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: azw lit lrf mbr


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Listening to the Future:. Martin (Music of Yes, LJ 11/15/96) argues convincingly that the progressive rock movement of the early 1970s, whose pillars are the bands King Crimson and Yes, deserves consideration as important avant-garde art. While the first three chapters offer an academic, philosophical, and sociological analysis of the genre, casual fans will appreciate Chapter 4: a lengthy annotated discography of important progressive rock albums. Unfortunately, Martin's biases sometimes undercut his thoughtful arguments.

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Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Listening to the Future: The Time of Progressive Rock, 1968-1978.

In "Listening to the Future", Bill Martin argues that it is a musical and political mistake to ignore this period of tremendous creativity, a period which still finds resonance in rock music today. He sets the scene for the emergence of progressive rock (showing that, in fact, there has always been a progressive trend in rock music, a trend that took a quantum leap in the late sixties), and develops a terminology for understanding how an avant-garde could arise out of the sonic and social materials of.

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Home Browse Books Book details, Listening to the Future: The Time of Progressive. Listening to the Future: The Time of Progressive Rock, 1968-1978. In the early 1970s, progressive rock bands like King Crimson, Yes, Jethro Tull, and Emerson, Lake, and Palmer produced visionary, adventurous works, often of epic length. Martin shows that there has always been a progressive trend in rock music, and develops a terminology for understanding how a popular avant-garde arose out of the sonic and social materials of rock.

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In "Listening to the Future", Bill Martin argues that it is a musical and political mistake to ignore this period of tremendous creativity, a period which still finds resonance in rock music today

In "Listening to the Future", Bill Martin argues that it is a musical and political mistake to ignore this period of tremendous creativity, a period which still finds resonance in rock music today.

Listening to the Future: The Time of Progressive Rock, 1968-1978". Politics in the Impasse: Explorations in Postsecular Social Theory". The radical project: Sartrean investigations". Ethical Marxism: The Categorical Imperative of Liberation (Creative Marxism)". Into the Wild: Badiou, actually-existing Maoism, and the vital mix of yesterday and tomorrow".

Listening to the Future The Time of Progressive Rock, 1968-1978 by Bill Martin and Publisher Open Court. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780812699449, 0812699440. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780812693683, 081269368X. Back to Top. Get to Know Us. About VitalSource.

In the early seventies, King Crimson, Yes, Jethro Tull, Emerson, Lake and Palmer, and many others brought forth a series of adventurous and visionary works, often of epic length. Responding both to the new possibilities in rock music opened up by "Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band", as well as to the countercultural politics and aesthetics of the late sixties, these musicians applied consummate instrumental and compositional skill to transgressing boundaries. Since the late seventies, histories of rock music have either ignored or marginalized the progressive rock era. In part, this has occurred because rock music criticism has taken an almost completely sociological turn, with little or no interest in musical form itself. In "Listening to the Future", Bill Martin argues that it is a musical and political mistake to ignore this period of tremendous creativity, a period which still finds resonance in rock music today. He sets the scene for the emergence of progressive rock (showing that, in fact, there has always been a progressive trend in rock music, a trend that took a quantum leap in the late sixties), and develops a terminology for understanding how an avant-garde could arise out of the sonic and social materials of
User reviews
Doomwarden
First, reader beware: this is a very difficult academically oriented book by a DePaul University Philosophy Professor published by what appears to be an academic press. It is not geared to general readers who want a high level overview of what many aficionados called the "Art Rock" era. It assumes you know all that and much more. It uses words I haven't used or thought about since graduate school, sometimes several times in the same sentence.
It is hard going but well worth the journey. If you love this music (and I do) you will learn much about the music, groups and individual musicians. You will also learn a lot about Marxism, sociology, the social movements and philosophical ideas that underly what is now called "progressive rock." The book is so thought provoking that I intend to read it again after reading books by the same author on "Ethical Marxism" and the progressive rock group Yes.
The only reason I did not give this book five stars is that it is burdened by a professorial pomposity that is really hard to get past. At times the tongue in cheek criticisms of other scholars are hilarious. At other times the author simply calls his academic colleagues or their ideas "Stupid." This makes one wonder if people in academia with different viewpoints have manners. The seeming effort to land the cleverest "gotcha" does detract from a book that all lovers of bands like Yes, King Crimson, ELP, Jethro Tull, Renaissance and the like will be enriched by reading.
Grosho
Martin is obviously a passionate, committed, and highly knowledgeable fan of progressive rock. He is fully entitled to his opinions. Unfortunately, Martin ties himself up in philosophical knots -- and envelops himself in the political correctness of tenured academia -- to justify the inconsistent categorization/taxonomy of progressive rock that ultimately derives from his tastes. This is too bad, because a more consistent and fair-minded treatise would have been more valuable. It also would have most likely not been book-length, because the tedious "Toward a Theory" chapter could have been condensed into 10 pages or less. Martin would also have known to avoid this tedium if he had read Ben Watson's "Negative Dialectics of Poodle Play"... but then Martin has no use for Frank Zappa, so of course he didn't read it.

Martin may be a philosopher, but he is evidentially not up on his Aristotlean logic. If he were, he would understand the following:

!JT

JT -> PF

HC -> FZ
Chuynopana
THE BOOK's IDEA OF PUNK ROCK Bill martin's argument is that punk rock appeared as a new wave of music. He completely shatters the myth of it being a type of music against progressive rock by stating that it was a great part of the rock era. The line, "By the mideighties, punk was either a 'hard-core' taste for a few people with leather jackets,and mohawks or it had merged into a larger new wave scene" is an example of biased word choise. This is not historically accurate. This resource, however, is scholarly because of the many noted historians in its bibliography. It also goes into a hardcore generation and bands that have shaped punk music. It does not recognize punk rock as an entirely new music, but views it as one large part of progressive rock history. The historical question being persued is what has punk rock provided for progressive rock? This is answered and then the book moves on to other music genres.
Querlaca
I really wanted to like this book. I like a lot of Progressive Rock. I like a lot of philosophy. Unfortunately, Professor Martin writes with a meandering obscurity that resembles Yes lyrics at their most impenetrable, or like reading Hegel after not having slept for sixteen hours. Simply put, Martin is an appallingly bad writer. It's too bad that as writing models, Martin bypassed Schopenhauer, Hume & Nietzsche. He seems to prefer Hegel, Fichte and Heidegger.
I agree with several of Martin's opinions, though. I love King Crimson, Jethro Tull and Gentle Giant, and all of these bands are given thoughtful analysis by Prof. Martin. Martin has little time for Rush; considering that Rush is the most overrated prog band ever, I heartily concur.
Frank Zappa isn't included among the giants of progressive music (Martin takes something like eight pages to explain why Zappa isn't covered, but he never gets much beyond the "I don't like his lyrics" stage ). Zappa's music is, truly, more "progressive" than most of the bands covered here. Personally, I think I detect a political bias on Martin's part: one gets the feeling that had Zappa wrote Utopian lyrics that involved gnomes and fairies, or had embraced the Left as had his contemporaries, he would take up a major part of this book. Some more curious omissions are Captain Beefheart & Pink Floyd.
As far as Martin's philosophy is concerned, he is apparently of the Hegelian-Marxist school of thought. Perhaps that is why his theory of a progressive-rock "Zeitgeist" never really gets going. The main flaw, in my opinion, is that this "logic of history" approach is biased from the get-go. For his theory to work, Martin had to leave out inconvenient accessories. That explains the absence of Zappa.
Auridora
I found this book enjoyable and infuriating at the same time. Martin's take on prog rock is well informed and thorough. But I kept wanting to argue with him all the time I was reading it.
My main problem with the book is that Martin has specifically modified his definition of progressive rock to exclude Frank Zappa. His definition also excludes Pink Floyd, while admitting the Mahavishnu Orchestra. This strikes me as ducking the issue; if Martin were to consider the work of Zappa along side Yes, King Crimson, etc., he would probably have to modify his thesis, and would probably has produced a stronger book.
Nevertheless, I am quite glad I bought this. But my copy will be severely marked up!!!