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Free eBook A Bushel of Pearls: Painting for Sale in Eighteenth-Century Yangchow download

by Ginger Cheng-chi Hsü

Free eBook A Bushel of Pearls: Painting for Sale in Eighteenth-Century Yangchow download ISBN: 0804732523
Author: Ginger Cheng-chi Hsü
Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (May 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 336
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1617 mb
Size FLAC: 1474 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf mobi doc txt


Painting in eighteenth-century Yangchow, a city that dominated the political and economic scene of mid-Qing .

Painting in eighteenth-century Yangchow, a city that dominated the political and economic scene of mid-Qing China, has traditionally been viewed as the product of a group of nonconformist, eccentric artists who were supported by wealthy merchants. Rather, it studies eighteenth-century Yangchow paintings as artistic products shaped by collective social and cultural experiences, and by constant exchanges between the artists and their audience.

Painting in eighteenth-century Yangchow, a city that dominated the . Hsü offers her book as an excellent example of this and has aptly chosen to focus on the city of Yangchow and its painters in the 28th century.

Similar books and articles. Visions of the Enlightenment: The Edict on Religion of 1788 and the Politics of the Public Sphere in Eighteenth-Century Prussia. Michael Sauter - 2009 - Brill. Charles Lamotte's "an Essay Upon Poetry and Painting" and Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics. James Malek - 1971 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (4):467-473.

Ginger Hsü has provided such an insight into eighteenth-century Yangchow, a city renowned at the time .

Ginger Hsü has provided such an insight into eighteenth-century Yangchow, a city renowned at the time for its wealth, beauty, and cultural productivity, and now frequently cited as the exemplary site of social change in Ch'ing China. Although Yangchow is as closely associated with painting in China as are Venice and Florence in Europe, Hsü's is the first monograph-length study of Yangchow painting to have been published in English.

Painting in eighteenth-century Yangchow, a city that dominated the political and economic scene of mid-Qing China, has traditionally been viewed as the product of a group of nonconformist, "eccentric" artists who were supported by wealthy merchants. This book, however, does not focus on the creative energy of the individual artist, the rise of the Yangchow school of painting, or patronage narrowly defined.

Hsü, Ginger Cheng-chi. A Bushel of Pearls: Painting for Sale in Eighteenth-Century Yangchow. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001. Finnane also mentions A Bushel of Pearls in her own book, Speaking of Yangzhou, praising it for its depiction of the complex social and economic relationships that made up the commercial society of eighteenth Yangzhou. Four of the book’s chapters center on painters, three of whom are often considered part of the eight eccentrics of Yangzhou (Huang Shen, Cheng Hsieh, and Chin Nung).

A Bushel of Pearls: Painting for Sale in Eighteenth-Century Yangchow .

Shitao: Painting and Modernity in Early Qing China. New York: Cambridge Uni versity Press, 2001. Hs, Ginger Cheng-chi. Stanford University Press, 2001. A Historian Looks at Chinese Painting. Asian (May 1941): 215-19. Van Gulik, Robert H. Chinese Pictorial Art as Viewed by the Connoisseur.

A Bushel of Pearls: Painting for Sale in Eighteenth-Century. Contemporary Court Style of Painting into Mid-Eighteenth Century Chinese. Society through Woodblock Prints. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Kobayashi, Hiromitsu. Suzhou Prints and Western Perspective The Painting. Techniques of Jesuit Artists at the Qing Court and Dissemination of the. In John W. O’Malley et a. ed. The Jesuits II: Cultures, Sciences, and the Arts, 1540-1773.

Painting in eighteenth-century Yangchow, a city that dominated the political and economic scene of mid-Qing China, has traditionally been viewed as the product of a group of nonconformist, “eccentric” artists who were supported by wealthy merchants.This book, however, does not focus on the creative energy of the individual artist, the rise of the Yangchow school of painting, or patronage narrowly defined. Rather, it studies eighteenth-century Yangchow paintings as artistic products shaped by collective social and cultural experiences, and by constant exchanges between the artists and their audience. The author examines the paintings as commodities, revealing the mechanism of their exchange and the values negotiated, and she interprets the paintings in a framework that moves beyond economics into the social, political, historical, and literary contexts of their creation and appreciation.The book begins by considering merchant patrons long associated with the Yangchow school of painting, and goes on to reveal that there were patrons from lower socioeconomic levels who were, in fact, perhaps the major consumers of Yangchow painting. The author then discusses four artists who exemplify the diversity of backgrounds and artistic traditions of Yangchow painters and patrons.Fang Shih-shu represents the traditional scholar painter of conservative orthodox landscapes. Huang Shen, by contrast, represents painters with craftsman backgrounds who mingle the values of the literati with the technical skill of artisans. The last two painters, Cheng Hsieh and Chin Nung, represent the emergence of new types of artists who adopted painting as an occupation and commercialized both their artistic products and their personal cultural refinement and literati status.By reconstructing the economic lives of these artists, examining their social roles, identifying their networks of patronage, and investigating their aesthetic choices, this book illuminates the process of professionalization of the scholar-artist and the commodification of literati culture in late imperial China.