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Free eBook Triumvirate: McKim, Mead White: Art, Architecture, Scandal, and Class in America's Gilded Age download

by Mosette Broderick

Free eBook Triumvirate: McKim, Mead  White: Art, Architecture, Scandal, and Class in America's Gilded Age download ISBN: 0394536622
Author: Mosette Broderick
Publisher: Knopf; 1st Edition edition (October 26, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 608
Category: Art and workmanship
Subcategory: Architecture
Size MP3: 1425 mb
Size FLAC: 1735 mb
Rating: 4.8
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In this unsatisfying overview, Broderick looks at one of the leading architectural firms in tury America

In this unsatisfying overview, Broderick looks at one of the leading architectural firms in tury America. Redefining the American aesthetic, McKim, Mead & White put its stamp on Boston, Baltimore, and Newport, and most particularly New York, where it built NYU's and Columbia's libraries, the second Madison Square Garden, and the original Pennsylvania Station.

McKim, Mead & White built houses for America’s greatest financiers and magnates: the Astors, Joseph Pulitzer .

McKim, Mead & White built houses for America’s greatest financiers and magnates: the Astors, Joseph Pulitzer, the Vanderbilts, Henry Villard, and J. P. Morgan, among others. They designed and built churches-Trinity Church in Boston, Judson Memorial Baptist Church in New York, and the Lovely Lane Methodist Church in Baltimore.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Never Mind the Laptops: Kids, Computers, and the Transformation of Learning. Also by mosette broderick. The Villard Houses: Life Story of a Landmark. Indian Hill, the house of Ben: Perley Poore; Colonial America meets Waverley, as drawn by Stanford White. This Is a Borzoi Book.

Broderick, Mosette (2010), Triumvirate: McKim, Mead & White: Art, Architecture, Scandal, and Class in America's Gilded Ag. Baker, Paul R. Stanny: The Gilded Life of Stanford White. New York: Free Press, 1989.

Broderick, Mosette (2010), Triumvirate: McKim, Mead & White: Art, Architecture, Scandal, and Class in America's Gilded Age. ^ Broderick, Mosette "Triumvirate: McKim, Mead & White Art, Architecture, Scandal, and Class in America's Gilded Age", Knopf, page vii". bequeathed her entire estate to the trustees of Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts" in New York Times (April 23, 1936).

McKim, Mead & White built houses for Americas greatest financiers and magnates: the Astors, Joseph Pulitzer, the .

McKim, Mead & White built houses for Americas greatest financiers and magnates: the Astors, Joseph Pulitzer, the Vanderbilts, Henry Villard, and J. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Mckim, mead & white.

McKim, Mead & White: Art, Architecture, Scandal, and Class in America's Gilded Age. Author. Mckim, mead & white. In the early 1890s Columbia College and New York University moved to the northern region of the city to create campuses that they hoped would give them academic credibility. Two Roman domes built upon upon hilltops in New York, two libraries built to preserve the thoughts of the ages; two magnificent buildings meant to shape the identity of recently acquired wealth in the nineteenth century. The two colleges prepared to take themselves seriously.

Triumvirate: McKim, Mead & White: Art, Architecture, Scandal, and Class in America's Gilded Age is Broderick's peek at the highly influential firm and the personalities behind it. Tonight, the architect and historian reads from he. . Tonight, the architect and historian reads from her book and discusses the aesthetic redefinition of houses, libraries and municipal buildings in New York at the turn of the twentieth century. Posted: Thursday March 15 2012.

Charles McKim, William Mead, and Stanford White were the three members of the firm and their goal was to bring the grandeur of Europe to American architecture. They designed homes for such notables as the Astors, the Vanderbilts, J. Morgan, and bad boy James Gordon Bennett Jr. Besides catering to the wealthy classes they also designed the Boston Public Library, Trinity Church in Boston, the old Madison Square Garden, and the Washington Square Arch. This success did not come easily and they didn’t live storybook lives. Though little is known about Mead’s, McKim’s and White’s lives were more.

A rich, fascinating saga of the most influential, far-reaching architectural firm of their time and of the dazzling triumvirate—Charles McKim, William Mead, and Stanford White—who came together, bound by the notion that architecture could help shape a nation in transition. They helped to refine America’s idea of beauty, elevated its architectural practice, and set the standard on the world’s stage.Their world and times were those of Edith Wharton and Henry James, though both writers and their society shunned the architects as being much too much about new money. They brought together the titans of their age with a vibrant and new American artistic community and helped to forge the arts of America’s Gilded Age, informed by the heritage of European culture.McKim, Mead & White built houses for America’s greatest financiers and magnates: the Astors, Joseph Pulitzer, the Vanderbilts, Henry Villard, and J. P. Morgan, among others . . . They designed and built churches—Trinity Church in Boston, Judson Memorial Baptist Church in New York, and the Lovely Lane Methodist Church in Baltimore . . . They built libraries—the Boston Public Library—and the social clubs for gentlemen, among them, the Freundschaft, the Algonquin of Boston, the Players club of New York, the Century Association, the University and Metropolitan clubs. . . . They built railroad terminals—the original Pennsylvania Station in New York City—and the first Roman arch in America for Washington Square (it put the world on notice that New York was now a major city on a par with Rome, Paris, and Berlin). They designed and built Columbia University, with Low Memorial Library at the centerpiece of its four-block campus, and New York University, and they built, as well, the old Madison Square Garden whose landmark tower marked its presence on the city’s skyline . . . Mosette Broderick’s Triumvirate is a book about America in its industrial transition; about money and power, about the education of an unsophisticated young country, and about the coming of artists as an accepted class in American society.Broderick, a renowned architectural and social historian, brilliantly weaves together the strands of biography, architecture, and history to tell the story of the houses and buildings Charles McKim, William Mead, and Stanford White designed. She writes of the firm’s clients, many of whom were establishing their names and places in upper-class society as they built and grabbed railroads, headed law firms and brokerage houses, owned newspapers, developed iron empires, and carved out a new direction for America’s modern age.
User reviews
Agrainel
As others have noted, Mosette Broderick's speculations about the sex lives of her subjects are based on very slender evidence.

I'm distrustful of her speculations, because the voluminous biographical details that lard her pages are often dead wrong on basic historical FACTS.

Just one example: on page 164 she writes that Isaac Bell "had begun to absorb himself in Republican politics. To avoid annoying the New York Republicans, he decided to begin his political career in Rhode Island, where he would not get in the way of old friends."

Further down on page 164, she writes that "Bell's party loyalty brought him a perk; he was appointed as the American Minister to the Netherlands by President Cleveland."

Broderick clearly thinks Bell and Cleveland were both Republicans.

BUT ..... Bell was a DEMOCRAT (quite possibly as a result of some sympathy for the post-Civil War South, where he made a fortune as a cotton broker) and so was GROVER CLEVELAND.

When such basic information can be found by a quick Google Search, one must wonder how Broderick got it so wrong.
Adrietius
An interesting book about the great American architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White. I would have like more pictures of their buildings, but that would be another book. This one tells the stories of the principals in detail, and they are interesting.
Liarienen
Excellent history of the M, M & W partnership
Dorintrius
It is great architectural history. Clearly showing that Stanford White was gay or bisexual. It can be inferred that the other two partners were also gay (bisexual). Having written myself I know you will always find something you could have done better or reworked. The author briefly touches on the fact that Stanford White built grand homes in which he always saved money on them when he could. The best example of these is this is Rosecliff on which he used terra cotta and not stone on the outside. A great architect is worth his price. The only thing I could of wished for would be a pictorial index of their work. It would of been interesting if the author discussed how the architects solved the problems associated with their buildings.
Shakagul
Facinating story
Clever
Hello-I really enjoyed Mosette Broderick's history of the principals of this famous New York firm. She provides an interesting insight into the personalities of the renowned architects both in terms of the Mauve Decade and its pursuits but also into the clients and the creation of illustrious buildings of the period. You will revel in the Stanford White persona, his friends, his coworkers such as the caustic Joseph Wells, and the New York of the "Gay 90s", with the Florodora girls and the whole gang.
Runeshaper
I bought this just to skim over for research. Instead of skimming I ended up reading the entire book. Hands down this is a great book!
The author is unquestionably an authority on McKim, Mead & White. This book attempts to create a context for their work, and in some ways succeeds, but is also held back by an uneven tone. The personal lives of the two major principals are well known and there is only a little new information. What is curious is the constant demotion of McKim and White, while Mead may finally get his due as the anchor for the firm, and the younger members, especially Joseph Wells are awarded credit for the best work of the office. Why does the author use so many pages to write an alternate view from Sam White's, Wilson's and Roth's book about the same firm, yet have a sense of ambivalence about their accomplishments? The technical qualities of the buildings are praised, yet the reliance on source books such as Letarouilly is criticized. It's like hearing Louis Sullivan's condemnation of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair all over again. It is interesting for the attempt to give context to the state of architectural practice at the turn of the century. There are several important observations about how the firm made fundamental strides in the professionalization of architecture.

Finally, there are certain editing slips that become annoying over the course of the book. Clients, colleagues and peers are sometimes referred to by their formal names, other times by variations on familiar first names, like these persons are our best friends. Some of the background stories could have stayed in the background so the larger points could be made. Lastly, "Sienna" is a made up word for a Toyota minivan, the Italian marble is "Siena"!