Free eBook On Boxing download

by Joyce Carol Oates

Free eBook On Boxing download ISBN: 0060874503
Author: Joyce Carol Oates
Publisher: Harper Perennial Modern Classics; Reprint edition (August 29, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Sports Books
Subcategory: Individual Sports
Size MP3: 1709 mb
Size FLAC: 1314 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: lrf rtf azw mbr


Joyce Carol Oates is a recipient of the National Medal of Humanities, the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof . Sam Sheridan refers to Oates’ On Boxing many times in his A Fighter’s Heart.

Joyce Carol Oates is a recipient of the National Medal of Humanities, the National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Book Award, and the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction, and has been several times nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. I am using Sheridan’s text for the second time in a writing course I am teaching at the college, and I finally broke down and bought the book this week.

With photographs by John Ranard. For the contender. ONTENTS. Other books by joyce carol oates.

Joyce Carol Oates returns with a dark, romantic, and captivating tale, set in the Great Lakes region of upstate New .

Joyce Carol Oates returns with a dark, romantic, and captivating tale, set in the Great Lakes region of upstate New York-the territory of her remarkably successful New York Times bestseller The Gravedigger's Daughter. Tristram Heade is a reclusive, repressed Virginia bachelor and antiquarian book collector who has traveled to Philadelphia to keep an appointment with a fellow dealer. But when he arrives, his life takes an unexpected and dizzying turn. A train porter returns his lost wallet, but the identification inside belongs to a man named Angus Markham, a gambler and real estate prospector.

These are just some ideas from a boxing fan that would love to read another Joyce Carol Oates book on boxing. Dec 03, 2010 Benjamin rated it liked it. Shelves: book-club. Written with an eye towards explaining and depicting the attraction toward and zeal for boxing that both it's participants and audience have, I feel unsure whether Joyce Carol Oates is really able to understand the perspective of a non-fan sufficiently to be able to convert or convince an outsider.

Joyce Carol Oates (born June 16, 1938) is an American writer. Oates published her first book in 1963 and has since published 58 novels, as well as a number of plays and novellas, and many volumes of short stories, poetry, and nonfiction. She has won many awards for her writing, including the National Book Award, for her novel them (1969), two O. Henry Awards, the National Humanities Medal and the Jerusalem Prize (2019)

by. Joyce Carol Oates. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

by. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. China-America Digital Academic Library (CADAL). Delaware County District Library (Ohio). Uploaded by Lotu Tii on January 23, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. Literary Marriages: A Study of Intertextuality in a Series of Short Stories by Joyce Carol Oates.

On Boxing - Ebook written by Joyce Carol Oates. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read On Boxing. A reissue of bestselling, award-winning author Joyce Carol Oates' classic collection of essays on boxing. More by Joyce Carol Oates.

Joyce Carol Oates has taught at Princeton University since 1978 and is currently the Roger S. Berlind Professor Emeritus in the . Joyce Carol Oates: It turned into a book called On Boxing with photographs by John Reiner. Berlind Professor Emeritus in the Humanities with the Program in Creative Writing. She retired from teaching in 2014. It’s been translated and published in many countries and was recently updated with some pieces about Mike Tyson, who is the only boxer whom I really got to know.

A reissue of bestselling, award-winning author Joyce Carol Oates' classic collection of essays on boxing.

User reviews
SoSok
There is much to be appreciated about this book for those who wish to truly contemplate boxing fully. Oates’ prose is beautiful, and she weaves a narrative which will keep the lover of literature and history stimulated as much as the lover of fighting. Sam Sheridan refers to Oates’ On Boxing many times in his A Fighter’s Heart. I am using Sheridan’s text for the second time in a writing course I am teaching at the college, and I finally broke down and bought the book this week. The first half was amazing, but the book is a collection of essays, was originally published in 1985-86, and it is, in many ways, a historical artifact that gives you a poetic vision of boxing up to that time, but does not age well in its insights into the contemporary heroes of the time, such as Tyson (his doc, which I have shown in part this week, sits on top of my worn copy of A Fighter’s Heart next to me), though, again, they are interesting historically. Her writing on Muhammad Ali is excellent, however, and needs to be read. I cannot entirely praise this book as a complete work, however, for the problem with this being a collection of essays is that the passionate prose style of Oates can just become hyperbolic when the same phrases or theories (the atavistic urge, the warrior primitive man, the sacrificial victim and sacred rite of boxing, the oft-repeated assertion that boxing is “not the most dangerous sport” but seventh, etc.) are used over and over again. And, as a man who has fought all of his life, mostly in the streets, it is hard to read too much from someone who writes “about violence”, but seems to have had no direct life-threatening experience of it herself.
This said, the more you know about the history of boxing, going back to the bare-knuckle days or ancient Greece (and I am currently reading Keirnan’s The Duel in European History, Mee’s The History of Bare Knuckle Prize Fighting, and Gorn’s excellent The Manly Art: Bare-Knuckle Prize Fighting in America), the more you will enjoy this book.

I have to mention that some of the writing on the history of race and boxing is powerful and extremely important, from before Jack Johnson through Ali and Tyson. She covers racism, lynchings, and all of those things that came before, during, and after that intertwine with the history of boxing.
An example of Oates’s prose:

“Where in his feckless youth Ali was a dazzling figure combining, say, the brashness of Hotspur and the insouciance of Lear’s Fool, he became in these dark, brooding, increasingly willed fights the closest analogue boxing contains to Lear himself; or, rather, since there is no great fight without two great boxers, the title matches Ali-Frazier I (which Frazier won by a decision) and Ali-Frazier III (which Ali won, just barely, when Frazier virtually collapsed after the fourteenth round) are boxing’s analogues to King Lear—ordeals of unfathomable human courage and resilience raised to the level of classic tragedy.” (197)
Ieslyaenn
I was surprisingly disappointed with this book but that's probably my own fault. I was looking for something along the lines of Liebling's "Sweet Science" but this was more of an essay about boxing written in an abstract manner. I would have liked to see Joyce use her skills as a writer to discuss fights and fighters and perhaps the fight scene, somewhat like Phil Berger in his great book "Blood Season." Joyce's writing is poignant and informational but to me it was kind of dull and didn't really hold my interest.
Kefym
Oates does well when she's talking about individual personalities (like Tyson), and for that I give this book two stars, but when she attempts to analyze boxing as a whole she repeatedly misses the mark.

She's far too grandiose in her claims, too arrogant in her attempts to encapsulate what boxing is and isn't. It just comes off as uninformed and pompous. The book seems to be meant for the people she encounters at dinner parties. People who know nothing about boxing, who aren't really interesting in knowing, and who will only nod politely as you cleverly try to draw parallels between unrelated topics. Sadly since they are indeed unrelated, no matter how much she tries to sew them up into an insightful bit of boxing anthropology, she fails. There are long passages of word salad and armchair psychology that don't describe anything meaningful or true in regards to boxing, at least not in my opinion (and I'm sure it would be the opinion of most boxers, everywhere).

So read it if you feel compelled. Perhaps make it a game to see how many times she repeats the same language over and over, or uses the same phraseology. She particularly loves the word quotidian. But avoid this book if you're looking for some actual insights into boxing. You'll do much better with A.J. Liebling.
Xisyaco
It's an ok book if you're into boxing and want some perspectives from someone who is truly a fan and has been following the history of this sport from early in her life. There are some good references to movies, books and, best of all, those fights that have been iconic and important in the history of boxing. A bit repetitive some times and also a bit "esoteric" in what boxing means for boxers and watchers.
Forcestalker
These are great stand alone essays but they don't compile very well into a cohesive singular book because the background information becomes repetitive. Marciano's record, integrating fights, boxing's place among the most dangerous sports, and so on, while all interesting and integral to the individual essays at hand, become tedious, especially after the third time, should the reader decide to tackle the book in one fell swoop. The brevity of the book suggests well-edited succinct writing, but, unfortunately, as the essays run together quickly the reader finds himself thinking, `Didn't I just read that a few minutes ago?' I still think it's important to have Oates' boxing essays compiled together. However, it may be a helpful suggestion for some readers to spread out the reading of these essays if this kind of repetition annoys you.