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Free eBook First Marathons [Electronic Edition]: Personal Encounters with the 26.2-Mile Monster download

by Gail Kislevitz

Free eBook First Marathons [Electronic Edition]: Personal Encounters with the 26.2-Mile Monster download ISBN: 189136913X
Author: Gail Kislevitz
Publisher: Breakaway Books (July 1, 1999)
Language: English
Category: Sports Books
Subcategory: Biographies
Size MP3: 1500 mb
Size FLAC: 1694 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: mobi txt lrf azw


Kislevitz, Gail W. Publication date.

Kislevitz, Gail W. Marathon running, Runners (Sports). New York : Breakaway Books. 1st ed. External-identifier. urn:acs6:sl:pdf:444-7838bc6b937b urn:acs6:sl:epub:97b-abb3469919fb urn:oclc:record:1034686168. ENCRYPTED DAISY download. For print-disabled users. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Personal Name: Kislevitz, Gail . On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

Personal Name: Kislevitz, Gail W. Rubrics: Marathon running Runners (Sports) Biography. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

First Marathons Personal Encounters with the 2. -Mile Monster by Gail Kislevitz 9781891369117 (Paperback, 1999) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 12 to 14 working days. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

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Introduction by Gail Waesche Kislevitz If you have the passion, you have the power. has been added to your Cart. I had already been pounding pavement for twenty-four years when I made the decision to run my first marathon. Growing up in the late sixties when women's sports was called cheerleading.

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First Marathons : Personal Encounters with the 2. - Mile Monster. by Gail Waesche Kislevitz. Introduction by Gail Waesche Kislevitz "If you have the passion, you have the power. Growing up in the late sixties when women's sports was called cheerleading, I had no formal training in running techniques. I just ran, pure and simple.

This is a must read for all runners motivated to reach new levels within their own personal journey.

ISBN: 978-1-48-359802-4. This is a must read for all runners motivated to reach new levels within their own personal journey. Enjoy the ride! - Sid Howard, Winner of 5 Masters World Championships, 50 United States National Championships, Holder of 5 World Records and 6 United States Records.

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Introduction by Gail Waesche Kislevitz

"If you have the passion, you have the power."

I had already been pounding pavement for twenty-four years when I made the decision to run my first marathon. Growing up in the late sixties when women's sports was called cheerleading, I had no formal training in running techniques. I just ran, pure and simple. I ran for the joy of it, the thrill of it, the escape of it. During college, I played lacrosse because there wasn't a women's track team and it seemed like the next best thing to do. But I still remained faithful to my daily run. I ran through the bitter-cold winters of Michigan during graduate school, through two pregnancies and countless other miles that seem to blend into one long life's run.

I don't know when I made the transformation from running as a sport to running as part of my life. I can't separate the two. When I run, my mind and body fuse together, creating an energy source that empowers me. It is my private time, my therapy, my religion.Ultimately I had to test myself, to see just how far I could go. I wanted to train correctly, so I bought running books filled with important information: training routines, nutrition guides, stretching techniques, injury prevention, speed work, pace and performance guidelines. Everything I needed to know about the technical aspects of running a marathon, except the most important thing to me-its soul. No book took on the task of describing the feeling, the heart, the core of a marathon. What would it be like? What would I feel out there? Would I hit the mythical wall? Could the last six miles be so difficult? This was the information I craved.

I spoke with friends (and strangers) who had run marathons. They answered my questions with such passion, such fever and excitement for the event that I was mesmerized. I inhaled their stories as they captured every moment of the race: the lows of utter despair and pain, the highs of inner strength. They became my role models.That was the beginning of this book. I am going to let runners speak for themselves-famous runners, unknowns, fast and slow, old and young. Through their experiences, you will feel the pain and the glory of running the marathon. Their lives h

User reviews
Redfury
I'm about to run my first marathon and wanted to read as much as I could about other people's experiences. This book was less interesting than I expected, probably because most of the stories seem to be retold by the editor, which means they're all written in the same bland style. I also hadn't realized the book was published in the 90's, and most of the stories are from marathons that were run in the 70's and 80's, so it felt somewhat outdated (since technology, popularity of races, and the way races are organized have changed a bit since then). It was an OK read, but I was hoping for something more along the lines of Dawn Dais' "Nonrunner's Marathon Guide for Women" which (despite the misleading and lame title) was funny, honest, and more enjoyable to read.
Felolak
I highly recommend this book to anyone contemplating running a marathon, or even a 10k. If you are out of shape and want to get back into shape, running is a great way to do it. It's not rocket science, just put one foot in front of the other (for miles on end). As someone who fell off the health wagon and is now getting back on, this book is a great motivator. The stories will make you laugh, cry, and you won't be able to put the book down. Read it - you will put on a pair of running shoes after reading it.
Zymbl
This book both reassured and terrified me before my first marathon. Hearing about all the awful things that befall people in 26.2 miles doesn't make me want to do the marathon more than before I read the book, but if only 1 or 2 of those things happen to me, I will feel lucky. Overall, I liked hearing about experiences from both elite athletes and normal folks.
greed style
I have run a few half marathons and decided to read this book as I began to consider running a full marathon. Regardless of what type of runner you are (beginner or agro athlete) this book contains inspirational stories ranging from everyday runners to elite runners. There is truly something for everyone in this book whether you want inspiration to run around your neighborhood block, a local 5K, or train for a full marathon. Highly recommended.
Ventelone
Really interesting to read about such varied reasons and motivations for people wanting to run their first marathon. The short chapters keep you constantly entertained.
Gardall
I read this after reading "A Race Like No Other" and was looking for the same inspiration and gripping read. It was not to be, this is indeed first marathon stories, but I found few of them to be something that really grabbed my attention and kept me reading page after page.
Meh.
riki
Eh, worth a read if you're training for a marathon, but many of the stories don't relate to average runners.
It's an easy book to read. Several stories you can select and read at your own pace. That's important because you might be bored by the repetition (and that's why I don't put 5 stars). However, it demystifies this monster: the marathon. The stories are written by people like all of us, not experts, not professional runners, of various ages. These made it ! So the message is why not you too ? In many cases, they provide information about what they did good and bad. Overall, good book.