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Free eBook Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man download

by Teddy Atlas

Free eBook Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man download ISBN: 0060542403
Author: Teddy Atlas
Publisher: Ecco (May 2, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 288
Category: Sports Books
Subcategory: Biographies
Size MP3: 1820 mb
Size FLAC: 1943 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: txt azw mobi rtf


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Atlas: From the Streets . He is also founder and chairman of the Dr. Theodore A. Atlas Foundation, named for his father, which has raised and donated more than one million dollars to individuals and organizations in need.

In this gritty, spellbinding tale, Atlas recounts. Of all the people who have affected by my life and influence the choices I've made, none has been more important than my father.

Like Teddy Atlas - inimitable, tough, honest, and wise - this book inspires. It is about so much more than boxing. It is a story of overcoming hardships, of compassion for those in need, of tremendous personal integrity, and of personal and professional triumph

Like Teddy Atlas - inimitable, tough, honest, and wise - this book inspires. It is a story of overcoming hardships, of compassion for those in need, of tremendous personal integrity, and of personal and professional triumph. Скачать (pdf, . 1 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

Producer for THE FIGHT with Teddy Atlas podcast - yatlasreal. Oh man this has got to be a ton of fun!

Producer for THE FIGHT with Teddy Atlas podcast - yatlasreal. Oh man this has got to be a ton of fun! 0 ответов 0 ретвитов 0 отметок Нравится.

I lived with relatives and friends The frustration of trying to get emotion out of a man like that was maddening. It was in part what drove my mother to drink

I lived with relatives and friends. It was around that time that my mother’s drinking really became a problem. It probably wouldn’t be fair to lay the blame for her drinking on Todd’s death or my father’s neglect, since alcoholism ran in her family, but those things certainly didn’t help. Ten o’clock on a Wednesday. The frustration of trying to get emotion out of a man like that was maddening. It was in part what drove my mother to drink. And me to do the things I did. I was in my teens when I started hanging out with the kids down the hill in Stapleton, which was a rough section of town.

Atlas, Teddy; Alson, Peter. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by YoshikoM on September 8, 2010.

Teddy Atlas wrote the ideal book for men struggling to find the truth about fear, loyalty, friendship, honor, commitment and even forgiveness. Being a "stand-up" guy has never been easy and most have gone the easy route by acting tough, instead of honestly confronting and over coming one's fears. Atlas isn't a preachy lightweight, because every chapter smacks the reader in the head with the powerful truth that we all have our fears and look for the easy way out of difficult situations

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as Play It to the Bone. In sharing his stories, Atlas reveals the philosophy by which he lives. Like Teddy Atlas - inimitable, tough, honest, and wise - this book inspires.

"Of all the people who have affected by my life and influence the choices I've made, none has been more important than my father."

So begins the autobiography of legendary boxing trainer and commentator Teddy Atlas, who grew from the rebellious son of a doctor to a man who embraces, and lives by, his father's values and code.

In this gritty, spellbinding tale, Atlas recounts his fascinating life -- as a juvenile delinquent on the streets of Staten Island; as a boxer and Golden Gloves champion under the tutelage of famed trainer Cus D'Amato; as a companion to the dangerous, unpredictable Sammy "the Bull" Gravano, up until the day Gravano turned rat and brought down crime boss John Gotti; and as a trainer of champions and contenders, among them fourteen-year-old Mike Tyson and heavyweight Michael Moorer, whom he led to the crown with a win over Evander Holyfield.

Equally engrossing are Teddy Atlas's accounts of training dancer and choreographer Twyla Tharp for her successful comeback at age forty-two; his work with actor Willem Dafoe, preparing him for his role as a concentration camp boxer in the film Triumph of the Spirit; his journey to Poland to choreograph the film's boxing scenes; and his own performance in movies such as Play It to the Bone. In sharing his stories, Atlas reveals the philosophy by which he lives.

Like Teddy Atlas -- inimitable, tough, honest, and wise -- this book inspires. It is about so much more than boxing. It is a story of overcoming hardships, of compassion for those in need, of tremendous personal integrity, and of personal and professional triumph.

User reviews
SadLendy
This is one of those compulsively readable books, probably due to how honest the author is about his own mistakes and shortcomings. Teddy Atlas has led a storied life and spares no details in this book (I almost wrote "pulls no punches" but I'll save the corniness for another review).

Atlas came from an upper-middle class Jewish family, headed by a father who was a doctor more devoted to his patients than to the care of his wife and children. Teddy didn't find the attention he sought at home, so he went out into the streets, mixing it up in the housing projects of Stapleton, Staten Island. He pulled armed robberies and got in fights. One of these exchanges left him with a wound that required four-hundred stitches, and left a scar that became the defining feature of his face.

Atlas charts his journey from jail to upstate New York (where he worked under the tutelage of legendary trainer Cus D'Amato), on into his years working with future heavyweight kingpin Mike Tyson. The book is liberally peppered with Atlas's wisdom and philosophy as it applies to life both inside the ring and life in general.

"Atlas" carries a coauthor tag, but Teddy's gruff voice is unmistakably etched into each page of the book. This is right up there with Thomas Hauser's "Black Lights" and Joyce Carol Oates' "On Boxing." It's that good. Highest Recommendation.
Bralore
Incredible, hard hitting look at Teddy Atlas and boxing. If you enjoy the sport then you must know Teddy Atlas and like him or not, he always shoots from the hip.

The book essentially operates at three levels: it chronicles his troubled youth and gives insight into his past and reasons for his missteps. He then takes that and delves further into the human psyche and mixes boxing, fear and human behavior. These factors are then explored in everyone from street thugs and gangsters to pugilists. Even if you are no fight fan, the book is worth a read insofar as its look at human nature.

He goes after quite a few people in the book but is pretty fair. The whole Tyson incident occupies only a few pages. This surprised me at first and actually I was expecting more, but why give the Tyson of that era the ink?

The author also did an excellent job. He made it sound like it was Teddy Atlas reading the pages to you. I'll now be checking out some of his other books.
Dagdatus
I am a long time boxing enthusiast, back to the times in the 50's when my Dad had the only 8" black & white TV in the neighborhood in a 6 ft long counsul with a radio on one end and a "78 record player on the other. Friday Night at the fights was a day men went only to our house and my Mom fled because of all of the cussing, beer drinking and shadow boxing going on as Dad and 5 or 6 or more neighbors got rip roaring drunk and had a great time.........

Man it was exciting, I was born in 1946 so being with men as they were watching the boxing matches was a big deal. They were drinking their beers and going on and on about former Champs. Joe Louim, Carmen Basililo Mariciano to name but a few I felt like I knew them personally.
I also knew all of the names of the promoters and referres and actually played this great time with my Dad until he passed in the 90's, Right up until closed circut TV started, We could never afford to go to a "Real Fight" besides they only held them in Detroit and that was 60 miles away.

By then they were talking about how corrupt the sport had become, of course he never realized it was corrupt it really was even when I was a kid and we were in our living room.

Teddy Atlas I feel is the ultimate example of been there done that. Unlike many books being released now by former boxers or trainers,
Teddy is not shy, He tells it like it is......
if you want the truth with no sugar here it is, He will tell you what fighters he trained to be Champs then got shaftet as they left him for the corrupt promoters.

He also fought his way up to be the incredible trainer he is and would not take a buy out or throw a fight, unlike many of the writers of these others books.
Thankfully Teddy has not been affected by Parkingson's disease as so many of our greats have.

If you want a great narrative Teddy gives it to you, one of the reveiwers says Teddy talks to much about himself. My feelings are when you are in the middle of the fray and know the details "Why would you Not Talk about the truth and your own adventures"

This ia a keeper book and I feel one that holds no punches just as Teddy never held a punch or had one of his fighters do that.

The truth's of Don King, Dundee, Arum and the rest of the questionable promoters are revealed as are the fights that, were delibertly thrown or traded to keep their fighter away from a tougher fighter so he could hit pay dirt while the better boxer in many cases died penniless..

Check this one book out,there are other great books like Teddy's but not many that tell the truth as he does.
I think or hope you enjoy reading this as much as I did. Besides it belongs in my Library of all Non Fiction and History Books only.
Qumenalu
To be perfectly honest with you my biggest reason for buying the book was that I've always been curious about how Teddy Atlas got that scar on his face, and figured the book would have to have that story in it.

I expected some interesting tales, an anecdote here or there, the obligatory name dropping, and some fun "Teddy-isms" regarding boxing and boxers peppered throughout the book.

Having been a fan of Teddy's for all these years you think I would have learned to never underestimate or take too lightly anything that a champion does.

This book is great. It's incredibly and unapologetically honest - no matter what. Atlas does not hide, sugarcoat, or `BS' anything. It's compelling and intriguing and bleeds character and integrity much like the man himself.

I learned so many things that I didn't know about Teddy Atlas and had some amazing "A-HA!" "...whoa..." and tearful moments.

I've always respected the man and love his insights and analysis on boxing, and this book added on 1,000% more respect.

If you're a boxing fan, have an interest in the historically significant figures and legends in boxing then this book is a must read.