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Free eBook Life: A Natural History of the First Four Billion Years of Life on Earth download

by Richard Fortey

Free eBook Life: A Natural History of the First Four Billion Years of Life on Earth download ISBN: 037570261X
Author: Richard Fortey
Publisher: Vintage (September 7, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 400
Category: Books for Christians
Subcategory: Theology
Size MP3: 1371 mb
Size FLAC: 1947 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: lrf docx lrf doc


Richard Fortey lives in London. Our eyes were the first to peer at the primeval rocks, to understand something of the ancient cargo they bore, to wonder at the preservation of extinct creatures on a bleak Arctic shore.

Richard Fortey lives in London. In that harsh place there must have been something oddly incongruous about these capering enthusiasts. But the tent had to be pitched. The shoreline was a beach stranded by the last great Ice Age, covered in shingle. The wind never ceased.

A marvelous museum of the past four billion years on earth-capacious, jammed with treasures, full of learning and wide-eyed wonder.

Anyone with the slightest interest in biology should read this book. A marvelous museum of the past four billion years on earth-capacious, jammed with treasures, full of learning and wide-eyed wonder. Fortey has a gift for really fleshing out the history of life on Earth and really making one appreciate the immense scale of geologic time in a way most pop science books do no. .

Fortey's narrative offers a number of wonderful set-pieces, including his . The same can be said about Fortey himself

Fortey's narrative offers a number of wonderful set-pieces, including his description of the explosion of new life forms during the Cambrian er. The same can be said about Fortey himself. His wonderful description of the emergence and proliferation of life on earth combines the vision of a scientist with an intimate knowledge of the fossil record with the insight of a scholar for masterful interpretation. Pub Date: April 7th, 1998.

A world leading paleontologist, Richard Fortey takes a biological perspective on evolution in his book, ‘Life’. It’s more like retelling the story of human evolution right from the beginning, while on the way solving the various mysteries to draw the final conclusion. 7. The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey- Spencer Wells (2002)

The story of life on Earth is long, spanning a period of about . billion . If you would like to learn the history of life from an expert, then read this book.

The story of life on Earth is long, spanning a period of about . billion years. The primitive life that emerged here several billion years ago harvested the energy in rotten-egg-smelling hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

The excitement of discovery cannot be bought, or faked, or learned from books," London Natural History Museum senior paleontologist Richard Fortey writes in Life.

Mobile version (beta). Life: A Natural History of the First Four Billion Years of Life on Earth. Download (epub, . 3 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Life: A natural history of the first four billion years of life on Earth. New York: Knopf, 1998. Sanchez D. "Generation of evolutionary novelty by functional shift. Bioessays, 1999,21:432–439. Gee H. Before the backbone: Views on the origin of the vertebrates. London; New York: Chapman & Hall, 1996. Shaking the tree: Readings from nature in the history of life. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000. Master control genes in development and evolution: The homeobox story.

Fortey used this book to explain how life has evolved over the last four billion years. It discusses evolution, biology, the origin of life, and paleontology

Fortey used this book to explain how life has evolved over the last four billion years. It discusses evolution, biology, the origin of life, and paleontology. Under its various titles it has become a best-seller; according to WorldCat, it is in over a thousand public libraries in the United States alone. Encyclopedia Article. University of Cambridge, Paleontology, Evolution, Natural History Museum, London, Royal Society.

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice"Extraordinary. . . . Anyone with the slightest interest in biology should read this book."--The New York Times Book Review"A marvelous museum of the past four billion years on earth--capacious, jammed with treasures, full of learning and wide-eyed wonder."--The Boston GlobeFrom its origins on the still-forming planet to the recent emergence of Homo sapiens--one of the world's leading paleontologists offers an absorbing account of how and why life on earth developed as it did. Interlacing the tale of his own adventures in the field with vivid descriptions of creatures who emerged and disappeared in the long march of geologic time, Richard Fortey sheds light upon a fascinating array of evolutionary wonders, mysteries, and debates. Brimming with wit, literary style, and the joy of discovery, this is an indispensable book that will delight the general reader and the scientist alike."A drama bolder and more sweeping than Gone with the Wind . . . a pleasure to read."--Science"A beautifully written and structured work . . . packed with lucid expositions of science."--Natural History
User reviews
MisterMax
About 80% digression, 20% (if that) actual writing on the history of life. I am a layperson, but I honestly could not tell you what, if anything, I learned about early life from this book. Fortey seems far more preoccupied with the trappings of being a scientist than he is with the science itself.

Buy this book if you want to know about the quality of the eggs served at Fortey's favorite bed and breakfast, "...the perfect bed and breakfast in a Tudor house with flag floors and improbable staircases. [The] breakfast was neither too much nor too little, the egg yolks were soft and the whites were cooked, the toast warm and cut into triangles on which to spread thick, home-made marmalade, and pots of tea arrived unbidden." (ACTUAL QUOTE from page 143 of Fortey hitting peak digression in a chapter on early terrestrial plant life.)

I can not understand how this book came to be known as such a touchstone on the topic.
Lucam
Richard Fortey gets you involved in his life and the life of the planet. Sentient beings like you and me are not the forgone conclusion of the evolutionary process. Our lineage is a succession of fortuitous events. We went through a succession of closing doors on our way to becoming human, according to Fortey. The Burgess shale, and other Cambrian remnants, show our ancient predessors, and those that didn't make the cut. Our success as a species is an unlikely as mold turning into an intelligent being. Read Mr. Fortey's book and discover, again, how lucky we are.
Golden freddi
This is a wonderful book and very well-written. Fortey's elegant prose style and his sense of humor make it a joy to read! However, it would have been a much better book if drawings had been included in the text to illustrate more of the organisms and concepts he introduces. Also, the bibliography is very skimpy.
Gavinrage
British paleontologist Richard Fortey has written a marvelously concise and erudite historical synopsis of terrestrial life from around 4,000 million years ago, when meteors seeded the planet with the elements, most importantly carbon, that allowed for the evolution of organic molecules, to around 25,000 years ago, when Cro-Magnon Homo sapiens founded interior decorating by painting animals on the walls of his cave living-rooms. Fortey's account necessarily leaves off with the beginning of recorded history. (Blessedly, the life forms "Benifer" and Michael Jackson fail to appear in the narrative even once.)
The author hits the high points, including the evolution of single cells, the formation of bacterial colonies, the initiation of chlorophyll-based photosynthesis (that ultimately charged the atmosphere with oxygen), the specialization of cells into tissues, the population of the seas, the advance onto land, the greening of the earth, the separation of ancient Pangaea into today's separate continents, the Age of Dinosaurs, the advent of live-birth from wombs, the ascendancy of mammals, and finally the evolution of Man. For me, the most interesting chapter was on the apocalyptic cataclysm which ended the Age of Dinosaurs, i.e. the asteroid which apparently slammed into the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula creating the Chicxulub Crater. The volume also includes several photo sections that provide an adequate visual summary of the text.
The time spans of Fortey's tale are almost beyond mental grasp. For instance, at one point the author states that tool making by hominids began about 2.5 million years ago. Yet the style of the tools, the "technology" if you will, then remained virtually unchanged for the next million years. After witnessing the dizzying pace of technological advancement just during the span of my own life, this stagnation for such an incomprehensible length of time is mind-boggling.
I wish I had but a fraction of Fortey's knowledge of our world. LIFE should be required reading in every high school science program.
Ohatollia
Like his more recent book Trilobyte, this book is well crafted. For the reader interested in the process of discovery by a scientist, I suspect that this book will satisfy. Sadly, I came to the book in a search for current information about the history of life on earth and was disappointed. The book drifts between stories of the author's paleontological expeditions and a discussion of theories of the history of life on earth. If the reader is actually attempting to learn what Fortey knows about that history he is left to riffle through the pages in search of information. There are some interesting discussions here, but unfortunately they are buried in chatty biography. In short, if you are interested in Richard Fortey's life, buy this book. If you are interested in life on this planet, keep looking.
Captain America
After reading a growing list of books on biology, geology, evolution and ecology if somebody asked me to recomend to good books to get an understanding and overview on the history of life on earth and geology I would recomend him `Life' and `Earth' both writen by Richard Fortey. Fortey is a very talented writer, he uses a similar approach as did Stephen Gould by presenting a complex topic in an accesible way starting with a very concrete example. Both books are easy and fun to read but when finished the reader realizes he managed to grasp quite a few important points. Both books were a good start to continue further reading on more specific topics within the areas of earth sciences, history of life and geology. I do strongly recomend this book
Kearanny
Fortey really makes you feel as if you're there in the distant geological past. the descriptions are so vivid and the prose is absolutely lovely. Get it, get it, get it, cant say enough good things about this book.really lovely stuff.
An excellent history of life on this planet told in a very personable way. I finished it and have started reading it again. The author presents a joy of discovery that is infectious - a pleasure to read. This is an excellent book as a starting off point into the fossil record and has excited me to learn more and dive deeper. 6 Stars - oh, they only allow 5? Oh well...