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Free eBook The Battle for Christmas download

by Stephen Nissenbaum

Free eBook The Battle for Christmas download ISBN: 0679412239
Author: Stephen Nissenbaum
Publisher: Knopf; 1 edition (November 5, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 381
Category: Books for Christians
Subcategory: Christian Living
Size MP3: 1950 mb
Size FLAC: 1929 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: lit mobi azw lrf


Электронная книга "The Battle for Christmas", Stephen Nissenbaum.

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The Battle for Christmas, by Stephen Nissenbaum, is a fascinating study of opposing views of the Christmas celebration in America. When immigrants brought their Christmas rituals from northern and southern Europe, the customs were not always welcome. Puritans dismissed Christmas as a pagan celebration masquerading as a Christian feast.

for Christmas, by Stephen Nissenbaum, is a fascinating study of opposing views of the Christmas celebration in America. Was I suprised to find that these battles have been going on for centuries. Illustrations are well-chosen, and the extensive use of footnotes and documentation really show off his work.

The Battle for Christmas also explores the not-always-proud history of Christmas charity, and the story of. .

The Battle for Christmas also explores the not-always-proud history of Christmas charity, and the story of Christmas among the slave community in the antebellum South - a celebration reminiscent of the carnival tradition. And he shows us as well how it has been both an instrument and a mirror of social change in America.

The Battle for Christmas. This scholarly analysis of our modern celebration of Christmas pulls together a thoroughly convincing case for the widely accepted notion that it is a 19th-century creation, indeed a deliberate reformation and taming of a holiday with wilder pagan origins.

Acclaim for STEPHEN NLSSENBAUM’S The Battle for Christmas Erudite yet entertainin. n unusual . Nissenbaum’s interpretation of the centuries-long struggle to control and shape our most popular holiday is a revelation. n unusual history of consumeris. n original study. Boston Globe A vivid, engaging. Richard D. Brown, University of Connecticut. Refreshingly original and utterly engaging.

Stephen Nissenbaum shows us that there is no "real" Christmas to which we must return to be authentic. Christmas has always been a malleable tradition, according to Nissenbaum

Stephen Nissenbaum shows us that there is no "real" Christmas to which we must return to be authentic. Christmas has always been a malleable tradition, according to Nissenbaum. That means that while it may be an "invented tradition", it is one we are free to reinvent for ourselves.

The Battle for Christmas book. In this intriguing and innovative work of social history, Stephen Nissenbaum rediscovers Christmas's carnival origins and shows how it was transformed, during the nineteenth century, into a festival of domesticity and consumerism. Drawing on a wealth of period documents and illustrations, Nissenbaum charts the invention of our current Yuletide traditions, from St. Nicholas to the Christmas tree and, perhaps most radically, the practice of giving gifts to children.

the 1820s spent part of their New Year’s Day in paying visits to the homes of their circle of acquaintances. There they were received by the women of the household, who were expected to serve them food and drink-alcoholic drink.

In 1659 the Massachusetts Bay General Court declared the celebration of Christmas to be a criminal offense. What the Puritans were trying to suppress was a holiday marked by boisterous invasions of the homes of wealthy. As recently as the early 19 century, Christmas reveling often resulted in violence and riots. In this book, Nissenbaum explores the not-always-proud history of Christmas in American culture. 46 illustrations.
User reviews
DART-SKRIMER
The Battle for Christmas, by Stephen Nissenbaum, is a fascinating study of opposing views of the Christmas celebration in America. When immigrants brought their Christmas rituals from northern and southern Europe, the customs were not always welcome. Puritans dismissed Christmas as a pagan celebration masquerading as a Christian feast. Some celebrations, particularly those related to Saturnalia and the Yule feast, were rowdy affairs. Drunken gangs demanded food and drink from rich residents, a practice that was later tamed into “Wassailing.”
In an attempt to tone down the violence, Washington Irving published the Knickerbocker History of New York, in which the narrator claimed to remember the peaceful and loving family celebrations of Old Dutch New York. Not many years later, Clement Moore wrote “A Visit from Saint Nicholas,” which established a new image of Father Christmas as a jolly fat man who gave presents to children.
Nissenbaum provides careful research for each point he makes about the change in views about Christmas. I found the book a very interesting read.
Meztisho
Wonderful book.

Until I read this text, I had the misconception that the struggles between the Christmas Holiday and the Secular were rather recent. Was I suprised to find that these battles have been going on for centuries.

Mr. Nissenbaum has done phenomenol research into the various issues/struggles concerning the Christmas Holiday. Illustrations are well-chosen, and the extensive use of footnotes and documentation really show off his work.

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, drinking, riots, and wild merry-making helped define the holiday, which is the main reason Puritans and others opposed the holiday. But by the 1820's, a class transformation had begun which would see Christmas become more family friendly and evolve into what we have today.

Nissenbaum goes into the darker aspects of Christmas as well. How slave-owners in the American South used Christmas to keep everyone in "festive" spirits is brought to light, and the pursuit of profit had its influence as well.

The book goes into more material than what I have briefly mentioned here. And it's well worth anyone's time.

I don't agree with all of Mr. Nissenbaum's conclusions myself, but I was suprised when I heard there were big debates about keeping stores open on Christmas (back in the 1820's) even than.

The More Times Change . . . .

JThree
Williston ND
Alsath
I used to read "A Christmas Carol" every year as a tradition and now I have added this to my annual read list. This book gives the history of Christmas and explains how many of the traditions that we consider to be timeless and carried over to the US from "the old country" were carefully crafted and introduced a mere 100-150 years ago by wealth businessmen in New York who wanted to transform the raucous street fair that was Christmas (more like Mardi Gras) into a more peaceful time to focus on family and children ... throw in Thomas Nast and the advertising industry and you have the birth of the modern Christmas season that is so often the rant of the day on Fox News during this time of year.

According to Professor Nissenbaum the Christmas that we love to hate today was born out of the ideas of a small group of men in New York City and London as a way of transforming Christmas from a rowdy working class street festival to what it has become. Further, Christmas wasn't much practiced at all in the United States until the late 19th century and was outright banned in many of the early colonies.

This look at how Christmas has changed and evolved is essential reading if you want to have a conversation with someone who rants and raves about their perceptions of people who don't celebrate Christmas the way that they want you to celebrate it. Understanding the history of this seminal holiday in the United States helps to understand how it has become what it is and how, above all else, Christmas is a commercial holiday that hasn't had much to do with religion for a long time. My advice to those who want to hit people over the head with the religious nature of Christmas ... celebrate it without the spending spree that was artificially tacked onto the holiday by the men that are described in this book.
Atineda
Have you ever considered the mad Christmas rush and then read the Christian Bible stories in the Gospels. How did we get from Bethlehem to Black Friday? This book gives an interesting overview of the transition from a Evangelical Protestant view of no Christmas Celebration in colonial times, where Christmas was only celebrated in Christian circles by Roman Catholics and Episcopalians to what happens now. The rise of commercial Christmas filled the void left by the Protestant Churches. It also highlights the important role that the Unitarian Church played in the development of the North American family Christmas.
The book is well worth the read for a slice of an often unreported history. What is wonderful is that it is written by a Jewish author so we don't get a lot of cultural-religious baggage. As a Christian Minister, I find this refreshing!
Gandree
Quite excellent and entertaining book on the history of our Christmas customs. Eye opener and puts things in perspective. It was a gift and I have purchased at least two as gifts.