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Free eBook James, the Apostle of Faith: A Primary Christological Epistle for the Persecuted Church download

by Paul L. Maier,David P. Scaer

Free eBook James, the Apostle of Faith: A Primary Christological Epistle for the Persecuted Church download ISBN: 1592449905
Author: Paul L. Maier,David P. Scaer
Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub; Reprint edition (November 8, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 158
Category: Books for Christians
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference
Size MP3: 1912 mb
Size FLAC: 1459 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: docx mbr rtf lit


Paul, in a single epistle, can be made to do so - compare the gospel of Romans 1 and 3, and the law of Romans 2. .

Luther's distaste for the book is well-known, leaving some Lutherans more apt to undervalue the book.

Start by marking James, the Apostle of Faith: A Primary . He also does an excellent job explaining James 2 and how James and Paul come from the same position on justification, but are addressing different issues

Start by marking James, the Apostle of Faith: A Primary Christological Epistle for the Persecuted Church as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He also does an excellent job explaining James 2 and how James and Paul come from the same position on justification, but are addressing different issues.

James, the Apostle of Faith: A Primary Christological Epistle for the Persecuted. Scaer, David Paul was born on March 13, 1936 in Brooklyn. Son of Paul Henry and Victoria Ann (Zimmerman) Scaer. 56V74/?tag prabook0b-20. James, the Apostle of Faith: A Primary Christological Epistle for the Persecuted Church. The epistle of James is often poorly understood ) The epistle of James is often poorly understood. Beyond questions of authorship and dating, its contents are troubling. Bachelor, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, 1957.

The epistle of James is often poorly understood. Its powerful accusations of sin seem to overshadow the Gospel.

a primary christological epistle for the persecuted church. Published 1983 by Concordia in St. Louis, MO. Written in English. Bible, Criticism, interpretation. Bibliography: p. 152-154. As the title indicates, faith in Christ and the comforting Gospel are prominent in many places throughout this epistle. Dr. Paul Maier, Professor of Ancient History at Western Michigan University and author of several best-selling studies of the New Testament, provides a most interesting and informative Foreword, giving valuable historical background about James, the brother of our Lord, and the times in which he lived.

Scaer, David P. St. Louis, MO: Concordia Pub House, 1984. James, Orthodox Eastern Church. The Divine Liturgy of the Holy Glorious Apostle James, the Brother of God, First Hierarch of Jerusalem: Set to Melodies of the Russian Orthodox Church. Basking Ridge, NJ: Monastery of St. Mark of Ephesus, 1978.

Today, Paul's epistles continue to be vital roots of the theology, worship .

Today, Paul's epistles continue to be vital roots of the theology, worship and pastoral life in the Latin and Protestant traditions of the West, as well as the Eastern Catholic and Orthodox traditions of the East. Paul's influence on Christian thought and practice has been characterized as being as "profound as it is pervasive", among that of many other apostles. Paul confesses that "beyond measure" he persecuted the church of God, more specifically Hellenised diaspora Jews who had returned to the area of Jerusalem, prior to his his conversion.

The Epistles of Apostle Paul are the fruits of his Apostolic endeavors to uncover the teachings of Christ

The Epistles of Apostle Paul are the fruits of his Apostolic endeavors to uncover the teachings of Christ. Being the last to become an Apostle and having formerly persecuted the Christian Church, would Apostle Paul dare to accuse the "substitute" of the Lord Jesus Christ? This is absolutely unlikely. Apostle Paul accused Apostle Peter as an equal, as a brother.

Paul fought the good fight, even the greatest of fights; he fought for the gospel of Jesus . An angry mob persecuted them and ran them out of town. The Apostle continued as he told the Corinthians that if Christ had not risen from the grave his preaching was for naught

Paul fought the good fight, even the greatest of fights; he fought for the gospel of Jesus Christ. One of his selected battlegrounds, and one which led to his beheading at the hand of Nero, was the true doctrine of the literal bodily Resurrection of the Savior. The missionaries moved through other regions, finally arriving at Thessalonica (see Acts 17:1). Teaching the Greeks about the Resurrection. The Apostle continued as he told the Corinthians that if Christ had not risen from the grave his preaching was for naught. Why bother if there is no afterlife?

The epistle of James is often poorly understood. Beyond questions of authorship and dating, its contents are troubling. Its powerful accusations of sin seem to overshadow the Gospel. For this reason Luther called it an epistle of straw and questioned whether it should be in the Bible at all. Author David Scaer thinks differently, and he shares his insights with us in 'James, the Apostle of Faith' As the title indicates, faith in Christ and the comforting Gospel are prominent in many places throughout this epistle. Far from being a dreary series of moralisms, James is filled with references to the atonement, faith, and forgiveness - the sublime Gospel themes of the New Testament. Particularly revealing are many parallels between the Epistle of James and the Gospel of Matthew, especially the Sermon on the Mount and Jesus' agricultural parables. In this study of James, Dr. Scaer makes exciting discoveries, some of which will surprise you. You may not agree with everything he says, but your thinking will certainly be stimulated. Dr. Paul Maier, Professor of Ancient History at Western Michigan University and author of several best-selling studies of the New Testament, provides a most interesting and informative Foreword, giving valuable historical background about James, the brother of our Lord, and the times in which he lived.
User reviews
Oghmaghma
The Epistle of James has had a checkered history. Eusebius listed it among the
antilegomena (proposed books of the New Testament canon whose place therein was disputed) and Luther, at the beginning of the Reformation, termed it an epistle of straw. His negative assessment was softened somewhat with the years, however, and others, e.g., Melanchthon and Chemnitz, always recognized James as gospel. Dr. Scaer, of Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, IN, has done full justice to it.

It is pointed out that the epistle, in being sent to the "brethren," is directed foremost to the clergy, as that was the meaning of the term in New Testament times. This, says Dr. Scaer, accounts for the less than didactic mode of expression - unlike Paul's early readers, those of James were already well familiar with Christian theology. Perhaps this more abstract style accounts for the persistent idea that Paul-Augustine-Luther represent the lineage of salvation by faith alone and that James - especially chapter 2 - is the proponent for the necessity of faith AND works, a way of thinking which infects many denominations and which is probably the view of most Sunday-morning Christians. Such a misconception leads to the belief that only the Church is capable of sorting out the theology of Scipture for the layman or even that Scripture contradicts itself. Actually, such seeming contradictions may be found readily elsewhere, when verses are taken out of context. Paul, in a single epistle, can be made to do so - compare the gospel of Romans 1 and 3, and the law of Romans 2 - and Jesus at one point seems to support faith alone (Matth 9:22) and at another, the necessity of good works (Matth 25:35 ff)!
The resolution: the references to works are eschatological - the viewpoint of the Judge on the Last Day, who sees such good works as, not saving, but evidence of a saving faith (James 2:18; see also Hebrews 11). Faith is not simply a knowledge of who Jesus is, but a trust in him, and works are not entered in an accounting book, since transgressing in one law is transgressing in all (James 2:10,19).
One suspects that Luther's lingering mistrust of James was based on a youthful inculcation of this misunderstanding. It certainly existed in the mind of a former nun, who became my wife and is now reading this book.
Fato
David Scaer does a superb job of describing the Christocentric character of the catholic epistle of St. James. He demonstrates that St. James is not a preacher of works-righteousness, or a creator of an 'epistle of straw', but a faithful witness of Christ's life, death, and resurrection, and a firm confessor of the doctrine of justification by grace, through faith, for Christ's sake, apart from the works of the law.
Kison
The best little book on James I've read, I liked it so much I got Dr. Scaer's "Discourses in Matthew". Don't let the R.C.'s tell you James is a book on works and not faith unless you have first read this book to refute them :) I had his book on Christology but only made it 1/3 in and have not been able to find it since and I'm going to have to put it back on my wish list.
Shalinrad
In this short work, David Scaer provides an excellent and very readable commentary on the Epistle of James. Luther's distaste for the book is well-known, leaving some Lutherans more apt to undervalue the book. And mainly this is over the apparent contradiction on justification between James and the Apostle Paul, whose writings and theological weight dominate the New Testament.

But Scaer adeptly demonstrates that the Apostle James was not a theologian of works, and was addressing different issues than the Apostle Paul, who wrote later than James' epistle. Scaer's book is most valuable for its unlocking of a thoroughly Christological reading of the epistle. He carefully demonstrates how the language of James is loaded with theological imagery, especially drawn from the Gospels and Jesus' teachings in the Sermon on the Mount.

I did find it a bit unusual how often Scaer suggests that other NT authors may actually have been 'dependent' on James, or at least developed his ideas in more detail. But this is based on his view that James is not only one of the earliest NT writings, but the very first. But regardless, the book shows clearly throughout, that James was not a mere preacher of morals, but a writer who was clearly drawing on Christological imagery to demonstrate the shape of the Christian life and the responsibility of pastors. The back cover summarizes the book the best: "You may not agree with everything he says, but your thinking will certainly be stimulated." I certainly found this book increased my understanding of James, and would highly recommend it to all readers; and especially to Lutherans who struggle with reconciling James and Paul on the relationship of faith and works. Scaer ably shows the harmony, rather than discontinuity between the two.