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by Roger T. Beckwith

Free eBook The Old Testament Canon of the New Testament Church: and its Background in Early Judaism download ISBN: 1606082493
Author: Roger T. Beckwith
Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (November 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 541
Category: Books for Christians
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference
Size MP3: 1162 mb
Size FLAC: 1110 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: rtf doc mbr azw


Roger Beckwith has produced a scholarly work which is surely recognized as such in the field of Old Testament study.

Roger Beckwith has produced a scholarly work which is surely recognized as such in the field of Old Testament study. He has systematically taken the issues, by which the Old Testament Canon must be recognized, and explained them carefully and precisely. The detail in which Beckwith labored is immense. Each of the 28 titles of the Old Testament canon listed has an end-note attached, making the end-notes to chapter 3 as long as the chapter itself! The point of such evidence is that the individual books had become a collection sufficient enough to warrant various titles to the group (.

This new study of the Old Testament canon by Roger Beckwith is on a scale to match H. E. Ryle's classic work, which was first published in 1892. The result of many years of study, this book is a major work of scholarship on a subject which has been neglected in recent times. It is both historical and theological, but Beckwith's first consideration has been to make a thorough and unprejudiced historical investigation. One of his most important concerns—and one that is crucial for all students of Judaism, and Christians in particular—is to decide when the limits of the Jewish canon were settled.

The Old Testament Canon Today. Latimer House, Oxford. The extent ofthe Old Testament canon and the date ofits final definition is an issue which has had, and has, immense significance for issues such as biblical authority and the approach to biblical theology. We warmly anticipate the Revd Roger Beckwith's comprehensive book on the subject, shortly to appear, and are glad to print here his delineation of the. issues involved. Strange though it may seem, students of theology who want to go into the subject of the Old Testament canon find that the standard book on the subject was written as long ago as 1892.

of the New Testament Church: And Its Background in Early Judaism 6. How does the relation of the apostles to the New Testament books . The exact meaning of this term when applied to these books is unclear but implies their biblical authority was doubtful

The Old Testament Canon of the New Testament Church: And Its Background in Early Judaism. Bruce, F. F. The Canon of Scripture. Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1988. The exact meaning of this term when applied to these books is unclear but implies their biblical authority was doubtful. Thus, they are not included in Protestant versions of the Bible.

Denver Seminary Journal December 5, 2009 . 5. An affirmation of the Old Testament canon.

Roger Beckwith’s long out-of-print study of the Old Testament canon is on a scale to match . Ryle’s classic work, first published in 1892. This book, the result of many years’ study, is a major work of scholarship on a subject which has been neglected in recent times. It is both historical and theological, but the author’s first consideration has been to make a thorough and unprejudiced historical investigation. One of his most important concerns-and one that is crucial for all students of Judaism, and Christians in particular-is to decide when the limits of the Jewish canon were settled.

Book Overview But Beckwith has the advantage of writing after the Qumran (and other) discoveries; and he has also made full.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 6% restored. Главная The Old Testament Canon of the New Testament Church. The Old Testament Canon of the New Testament Church. Categories: Religion.

General Introduction to the Old Testament: The Canon. New York: Scribners, 1898. Westcott, Brooke Foss. First ed. with altera-tions. Chronicles and the Canon in New Testament Times". Vol. 33, no. 1 (March 1990): 75-84. Inspiration and Canonicity of the Bible: An Historical and Exeget-ical Study. London: Macmillan, 1901.

T his study of the New Testament canon and its authority looks deeper CANON . that these twenty-seven books belong in the New Testament 3 The Old Testament canon also raises important and interesting.

T his study of the New Testament canon and its authority looks deeper CANON REVISITED than the traditional surveys of councils and creeds, mining the biblical text itself for direction in understanding what the original authors and audi- ences believed the canon to b. that these twenty-seven books belong in the New Testament. o f t h e N e w Te s ta m e n t B o o k s Arthur G. Patzia, Senior Professor of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary; author, The Making of the New Testament Of all the recent books and articles on the canon of Scripture, this is the. one I recommend most.

This new study of the Old Testament canon by Roger Beckwith is on a scale to match H. E. Ryle's classic work, which was first published in 1892. But Beckwith has the advantage of writing after the Qumran (and other) discoveries; and he has also made full use of all the available sources, including biblical manuscripts and rabbinical and patristic literature, taking into account the seldom studied Syriac material as well as the Greek and Latin material. The result of many years of study, this book is a major work of scholarship on a subject which has been neglected in recent times. It is both historical and theological, but Beckwith's first consideration has been to make a thorough and unprejudiced historical investigation. One of his most important concerns - and one that is crucial for all students of Judaism, and Christians in particular - is to decide when the limits of the Jewish canon were settled. In the answer to this question lies an important key to the teaching of Jesus and his apostles, and the resultant beliefs of the New Testament church. Furthermore, any answers to questions about the state of the canon in the New Testament period would help to open a way through the present ecumenical (and interfaith) impasse on the subject. With its meticulous research and evenhanded approach, this book is sure to become the starting point for study of the Old Testament canon in the years to come.
User reviews
Dream
Helpful study of important issue.
Ieslyaenn
Roger Beckwith's "The Old Testament Canon of the New Testament Church" is a magisterial work on the issue he pursues. He has a masterful command of the material at hand and along the way provides the reader with an education in the fallacies of other works dealing with this issue; witnesses to the Canon; the facts of the Canon; the structure of the Canon; and the identity of the Canon. It's not an easy read, but if you're interested in issues related to how we got the Bible, the Canon, the Apocrypha, and the early Church's use of the Old Testament, then this is an important work that should be consulted. Canonical studies are making a comeback, and so revisiting Beckwith's work is a very worthwhile pursuit

As a matter of fairness, I should state that Roman Catholic readers will not agree with all of his conclusions, especially regarding the Apocrypha (even though I find his arguments persuasive on this point). Both Protestants and Catholics, however, should welcome Beckwith's work on account of its careful scholarship, even if one doesn't agree with all of his conclusions.

Other reviewers have covered some of Beckwith's material in detail, so I'll conclude with a list of his major conclusions:

1. Standard titles in the canon, a standard structure, a standard order and two standard counts (these are all interrelated) can probably be traced back to the second century B.C.
2. Disputes about 5 of the Old Testament books were only of limited scale and significance and probably arose out of exegetical work on books already ranked as canonical.
3. There was no wider Alexandrian (Greek) canon which accepted the Apocrypha, and even if there had been a distinct Alexandrian canon, it is the Palestinian one the first Christians would have taken over and used.
4. Pseudepigrapha were placed in a separate category from canon.
5. The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha were only included later, and not in an agreed way, by Christian Gentiles after the church's breach with the synagogue, among those whose knowledge of the primitive Christian canon was becoming blurred.
6. The three Jewish schools of interpretation all essentially agreed about the canon.
7. There is a general correspondence between the Christian canon and the Jewish. Christian evidence from New Testament endorses the Jewish titles for canon, their 3-fold structure, the traditional Jewish order, and possibly one or two standard Jewish numerations of the books.
8. On the question of the canonicity of the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha the truly primitive Christian evidence is negative.

While Beckwith's word on the Old Testament Canon of the New Testament Church may not be the last word, it is a very weighty one that any serious scholarship will have to contend with.
Arakus
This book is filled with useful information. Beckwith lays out all the evidence he has and the rationales behind his conclusions. To say it is filled with information is an understatement.

The section on Jesus' use of "Abel to Zechariah" alone is worth the price of the book. It helped me figure out that that passage is a prophecy of the Temple's destruction in AD 70.

My main summary would be this: there is no basis whatsoever for any sort of Palestinian canon that is different than the current Jewish/Protestant canon. And then in chapter 8, Beckwith lays out the case against any sort of Alexandrian canon coming from the Jews.
GEL
This is a book that anyone engaged in rigorous analysis of what the ancient church and synagogue held to be canonical simply must have.

Rarely has an author invested twenty five years in a book.

Rarely has an author so masterfully controlled the facts of his subject.

Rarely have assembled facts been sifted with such careful, clear, logical examination.

Rarely does one read such a book as this.
Mildorah
Beckwith has one objective, to prove that the 22 book Rabbinical canon existed before Christianity. He claims that the canon was established under the Maccabees around 164 BC (pages 435-6). He musters a huge amount of evidence in his discussion. Unfortunately, most of it is not relevant to his main point and none of it proves it.
He is simply engaging in wishful thinking for apologetic purposes. The subtext of his discussion is that those bad old Roman Catholics and Orthodox use the deuterocanonical books (the Apocrypha) despite the fact that Jesus, the Apostles and everyone else knew what the 'real' canon was.

Beckwith certainly represents a minority view on the canon issue. While the theory that the Jewish canon was established at Jamnia in 90 AD has been discredited, scholars push the date forward into the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD for the solidification of the Rabbinic canon not backwards. By this time Christianity had become a seperate religion so the decision of the Rabbis was irrelevant.

I bought this book simply because it was recommended as the best defence for the claim the canon was fixed before Christianity. Beckwith isn't very direct with his main thesis. It takes him ages to get to the point. He has no new evidence but simply explains away (not very convincingly) any evidence that doesn't suit him. I found his discussion on the canon of the Dead Sea Scrolls Community (Essenes?) to be particularly weak (pages 19, 55-57). His treatment of the Patristic witness to the canon is deceptive. He basically ignores the deuterocanonical quotes from the Church Fathers that cite them as scripture. I'm not sure why he would ignore them but he implies they were already too far removed from Jewish tradition to be relevant (pages 24-25).

Look up the book by Lee MacDonald on the canon if you want to balanced discussion.