» » A Student's Guide to Textual Criticism of the Bible: Its History, Methods and Results

Free eBook A Student's Guide to Textual Criticism of the Bible: Its History, Methods and Results download

by Paul D. Wegner

Free eBook A Student's Guide to Textual Criticism of the Bible: Its History, Methods and Results download ISBN: 0830827315
Author: Paul D. Wegner
Publisher: IVP Academic (April 9, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 334
Category: Books for Christians
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference
Size MP3: 1237 mb
Size FLAC: 1347 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: txt mobi docx doc


The Bible has been on a long historical journey since its original composition. Its texts have been copied and recopied. And despite the most careful and painstaking efforts of scribes and publishers down through the centuries, errors of one sort or another have crept in and have been reproduced. But if you are one of those interested in a general understanding of textual criticism, this book introduces you to textual criticism of the whole Bible-the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament.

Here Wegner guides the reader through the history and practice of New Testament textual criticism and provides . Jan 16, 2015 Bret James Stewart rated it it was amazing.

Here Wegner guides the reader through the history and practice of New Testament textual criticism and provides specific examples from Ephesians 1:1 and Romans 15:7. Subsequently, the discussion is directed upon the sources of New Testament textual criticism-the biblical papyri, uncial manuscripts, and minuscule manuscripts. Paul D. Wegner’s A Student’s Guide to Textual Criticism of the Bible: Its History, Methods, and Results provides a nice overview of the areas of biblical textual criticism for both testaments and general hermeneutics.

Wegner has provided teachers and students with a clearly written and wonderfully illustrated introduction to the practice of textual criticism of the entire Bible. JETS, November 2007). This inexpensive book can be read with profit by student and specialist alike. Its particular strengths are that it treats both OT and NT and that the text is accompanied by more than one hundred illustrations of various kinds that help to bring the history of the discipline alive for the reader. I read through the book with the same excitement that I have when reading a good detective novel!

The Bible has been on a long historical journey since its original composition.

The Bible has been on a long historical journey since its original composition. In the process you will gain an appreciation for the vast work that has been accomplished in preserving the text of Scripture and find a renewed confidence in its reliability. Sorting out the errors and determining the original wording is the task of textual criticism.

This book introduces you to textual criticism of the whole Bible-the Hebrew Old .

This book introduces you to textual criticism of the whole Bible-the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament. He explores original texts and fragments, examines errors and changes leading to discovery and a renewed confidence in the reliability of Scripture giving the reader an appreciation for the vast work that has been accomplished in preserving the text of Scripture. This work features black and white charts, photographs, and a glossary.

Wegner has provided teachers and students with a clearly written and wonderfully illustrated introduction to the . He is the author of A Student´s Guide to Textual Criticism: Its History, Methods, and Results (IVP, 2006), The Journey from Texts to Translations:The Origin and Development of the Bible (Baker Academic, 2004), and Using Old Testament Hebrew Preaching: A Guide for Students and Pastors (Kregel Academic, 2009).

Paul Wegner has provided teachers and students with a clearly written and . Chapter 1 gives a basic introduction to textual criticism. The final chapter in the first part of the book deals with the history of the transmission of the biblical text.

Paul Wegner has provided teachers and students with a clearly written and wonderfully illustrated introduction to the practice of textual criticism of the entire Bible. The first part covers the OT and describes the history of copying practices during five time periods.

A students guide to vectors and tensors. Shakespeare's Comedies: A Guide to Criticism (Blackwell Guides to Criticism). Recent Developments in the Textual Criticism of the Greek Bible. The schweich lectures on biblical archaeology, 1932 recent developments in the textual criticism of the greek bible. Textual Criticism at the Millennium.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for A Student's Guide to Textual Criticism of the . The lowest-priced, brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging (where packaging is applicable)

The lowest-priced, brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging (where packaging is applicable). Packaging should be the same as what is found in a retail store, unless the item is handmade or was packaged by the manufacturer in non-retail packaging, such as an unprinted box or plastic bag. See details for additional description.

The Bible has been on a long historical journey since its original composition. Its texts have been copied and recopied. And despite the most careful and painstaking efforts of scribes and publishers down through the centuries, errors of one sort or another have crept in and have been reproduced. Sorting out the errors and determining the original wording is the task of textual criticism. In fact, the task of textual criticism is so daunting and detailed that it is divided between Old Testament textual critics and New Testament textual critics. That is why nearly every book on the subject focuses on the textual criticism of either the Old or New Testament. But if you are one of those interested in a general understanding of textual criticism, this book introduces you to textual criticism of the whole Bible--the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament. In plain language and with ample illustration, Paul D. Wegner gives you an overview of the history and methods, aims and results of textual criticism. In the process you will gain an appreciation for the vast work that has been accomplished in preserving the text of Scripture and find a renewed confidence in its reliability.
User reviews
Survivors
Paul D. Wegner is the Director of Academic Graduate Studies Program and Professor of Old Testament Studies at Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary. Wegner has a M.Div. and Th.M from Trinity Divinity School, and a Ph.D. from Kings College, University of London. Prior to his position at Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, Wegner taught at Moody Bible Institute for roughly thirteen years in the Bible department and Phoenix Seminary for about eleven years as Professor of Old Testament. Wegner has written numerous articles in the field of biblical studies and textual criticism, authored several books, including, The Journey from Texts to Translations: The Origin and Development of the Bible (Baker Academic, 2004), Using Old Testament Hebrew in Preaching: A Guide for Students and Pastors (Kregel Academic, 2009), and contributed study notes for Habakkuk, Daniel, and an article on the reliability of the Old Testament for the highly acclaimed ESV Study Bible (Crossway, 2008). Wegner has consistently shown himself to be a competent scholar with a clear passion for bringing many of the conversations of the scholarly community in an accessible form to the classroom and pulpit.

A Student’s Guide to Textual Criticism: It’s History, Methods, and Results (IVP Academic, 2006) is a unique and accessible introductory guide through the trenches of the complexities that characterize the study of the textual criticism of the Bible. It is unique in that Wegner effectively covers both the Old Testament and New Testament in a single volume, and does so in tremendous detail. It is accessible in that Wagner is continually sensitive to the technicalities that often plague the conversations by building a language barrier between the expert and laity. This doesn’t mean that Wegner avoids the technical terms that the reader needs to know, but rather he explains and illustrates them in a way that cultivates understanding. The book opens with a general introduction to the study of textual criticism, including the definition and importance of the study itself, the explanation of the various transmissional errors that occur in the Bible (i.e. homophony, haplography, dittography, etc.), as well as the transmission of the biblical texts themselves. The learned reader may be tempted to merely skim over this introductory section assuming little benefit, but this would only result in the bypass of one of the most helpful sections of the book. The novice readers will want to spend as much time here as possible, and mastery is recommended. Wegner provides a host of examples and illustrations as he sets the stage for the more detailed investigation ahead.

The second and third sections of the book detail specified attention to both Old Testament and New Testament textual criticism. Both sections are thorough in examination and extremely user-friendly. In regards to the Old Testament, Wegner walks the reader through the history of Old Testament textual criticism and the methods with which such practice is best practiced. After walking the reader through Wegner provides two specific examples of how textual criticism works in practice, 1 Chronicles 6:40 and Hosea 7:14. Wegner closes the Old Testament section with a sizeable discussion on various sources closely associated with Old Testament Criticism. The same format is provided with regards to the New Testament textual criticism section. Here Wegner guides the reader through the history and practice of New Testament textual criticism and provides specific examples from Ephesians 1:1 and Romans 15:7. Subsequently, the discussion is directed upon the sources of New Testament textual criticism—the biblical papyri, uncial manuscripts, and minuscule manuscripts. With these two sections, both Old Testament and New Testament juxtaposed with one another the reader can quickly distinguish the difference between the two disciplines. Wegner also aids in this effort. The book closes with a look into other relevant text for the task of textual criticism, including early translations of the Old Testament and New Testament. The keen reader will certainly appreciate the inclusion of this section into the overall aim of the book, as some of these early versions of the biblical text become imperative the task at hand.

A Student’s Guide to Textual Criticism: It’s History, Methods, and Results is an essential resource for anyone interested in the underlying investigation of the Bible. Not only because the discipline of textual criticism, in general, is imperative to the preaching and teaching of the Bible, as Wegner makes clear, but he has labored to make the study accessible and comprehendible to the reader. Apart from the goldmine of information provided within the sections briefly described above, Wegner has also included relevant bibliographic material for further reading at the end of each section. Moreover, each section in the book is littered with helpful illustrations and photographs to better engage the reader with the groundwork taking place. Lastly, for quick reference Wegner has included a healthy 10-page glossary for relevant terms and an exhaustive name and subject index. If you are looking for an introduction to the complex world of textual criticism from a trusted and reliable source then A Student’s Guide to Textual Criticism is a book you should not overlook. Wegner has skillfully gathered a wealth of imperative information and presented it with judicious care and attention for the student of Scripture. If you are a pastor, teacher, student, or interested laymen, I couldn’t recommend this resource enough. It will encourage and enhance your understand and confidence in the Bible.

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
Goodman
Paul D. Wegner’s A Student’s Guide to Textual Criticism of the Bible: Its History, Methods, and Results provides a nice overview of the areas of biblical textual criticism for both testaments and general hermeneutics. As the title implies, he is assuming the reader has no previous knowledge of the subject.

The book itself is well done and interesting. Wegner includes a number of charts and graphs of various sorts as well as photographs of people and things. These help bring the subject the life and makes some of the heavier information easier to understand. The book also includes the standard academic features one would hope to be present: a glossary, subject index, and name index. As this is an introductory text, he includes a list of recommended books after each segment.

Part One deals with the basics of textual criticism such as what it is, why it is important, and an overview of both testaments, which is necessary as there is some divergence between the two. The goals of textual criticism in both testaments are also addressed. Wegner goes on to describe the different types of errors the texts display before going on to cover the transmission of the biblical texts themselves. The latter involves the known history of the books, how they were copied and maintained throughout time.

Part Two deals specifically with Old Testament textual criticism. He provides a historical overview of the subject, then describes the modern editions of the O.T. before addressing the methodology of determining the most plausible original reading of the text. I suppose he does it in this order to show what we have so that we have something—a target goal or final text--upon which to focus. Lastly, Wegner provides an overview of the major sources for O.T. textual criticism.

Part Three is the same as the previous section except that it is focuses on the New Testament. As I mentioned above, criticism for the two testaments are not identical as they have different starting points and circumstances in the two discipline that affect the procedures.

Part Four provides an overview of the primary ancient versions of the Bible and their impact upon textual criticism in the past and in the future. Wegner divides this topic by the geo-political division of Eastern tradition and Western tradition.

Wegner’s writing style is accurate and easy to follow. He does include a few examples of how to consider a text, and he provides a list of suggested verses to use as subjects to which to apply this knowledge, but I would argue that this book is not really a “student’s guide” in any capacity beyond it merely being an introductory text on the subject. There are not summary questions or any other aids that one might expect in a book considered such a guide.

Overall, I think this is a great book. It will appeal to those who are interested in textual criticism, of course, but also to those interested in hermeneutics, exegesis, biblical text history, and the rationale behind the generally accepted modern versions of the Bible. Almost all of this information is included in a larger earlier book: The Journey from Texts to Translations: The Origin and Development of the Bible (BakerAcademic, 1999). A Students Guide… is essentially the pertinent portion of this larger text (which also deals with translations, a subject not covered in A Student’s Guide…). Thus, I would maintain that one should read one or the other, but probably not both as the information is largely duplication. Unless you have to read it for a class and/or only want the textual criticism information, I posit The Journey… as the better text to get as it is more complete.

Wegner has done a fantastic job of dealing with this subject and has provided an interesting introduction that is fun to read. Highly recommended—five stars.
Kizshura
A wonderful starting point for the novice in the complex and constantly-shifting field of textual criticism. Wegner brings a workman bluecollar approach to the subject helping to give handles to the concepts involved. He provides examples from both testaments with explanations for the reasoning involved. Two strong features for classroom use are the excurses Wegner provides on how to read the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Hebrew OT) and the UBS 4th Ed (Greek NT). The best feature, however, is the glossary of textual critical terms. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is a perceived favoritism toward the OT that slanted some of it in my reading.