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Free eBook Esther in Medieval Garb: Jewish Interpretation of the Book of Esther in the Middle Ages (SUNY series in Judaica: Hermeneutics, Mysticism, and Religion) download

by Barry Dov Walfish

Free eBook Esther in Medieval Garb: Jewish Interpretation of the Book of Esther in the Middle Ages (SUNY series in Judaica:  Hermeneutics, Mysticism, and Religion) download ISBN: 0791410404
Author: Barry Dov Walfish
Publisher: SUNY Press; First Softcover Printing edition (September 21, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 400
Category: Books for Christians
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference
Size MP3: 1957 mb
Size FLAC: 1951 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lit lrf rtf docx


Series: S U N Y Series in Judaica. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Series: S U N Y Series in Judaica. File: PDF, 2. 3 MB. Читать онлайн. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. No Condition Is Permanent: The Social Dynamics of Agrarian Change in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Esther in Medieval Garb book. This comprehensive history, the first to appear in English, gives a vivid portrayal of the Book of Esther's role in the intellectual and cultural life of Jews in the Middle Ages. This comprehensive history, the first to appear in English, gives. Much of the study is based on material that exists only in manuscripts, and it introduces many exegetes hitherto unknown or unstudied.

The earliest medieval Jewish mystical writings, or kabbalah, date from the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries

The earliest medieval Jewish mystical writings, or kabbalah, date from the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries. This is the first book to focus on the most prodigious group active at that time―the ‘Circle of Contemplation’. The ‘Circle of Contemplation’ generated a mystical theology that differs radically from mainstream kabbalistic theosophy. A meticulous and systematic study of these writings forms the core of this book.

Esther in medieval garb: Jewish interpretation of the book of Esther in the Middle Ages/Barry Dov Walfish. p. cm. - (Suny series in Judaica) Revision of thesis (P. .Esther in medieval garb: Jewish interpretation of the book of Esther in the Middle Ages/Barry Dov Walfish.Halayo Mosesben Isaac Halayo, MS. Osterreichische Nationalbibliothek (Vienna) He.

Barry Dov Walfish," Speculum 70, no. 2 (Ap. 1995): 442-444. Artificial Paleography: Computational Approaches to Identifying Script Types in Medieval Manuscripts. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Doing Things beside Domesday Book. The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis. The Digital Middle Ages: An Introduction. Birnbaum et al. Kestemont et al. Icons of Sound: Auralizing the Lost Voice of Hagia Sophia. Pentcheva et al. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

Mordecai the Exilarch: Some Thoughts on the Book of Esther. Jules Gleicher - 2001 - Interpretation 28 (3):187-200.

Johanna W. H. van Wijk-Bos - 2006 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 60 (4):473-474. Mordecai the Exilarch: Some Thoughts on the Book of Esther. Donna DeSarro-Raynal - 2011 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 65 (1):92-92. Mark A. Throntveit - 1999 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 53 (4):422-424. Added to PP index 2014-03-27.

E-book via Walfish, Barry Dov. Show description. This e-book explores a brand new version for the creation, revision, and reception of Biblical texts as Scripture. Read Online or Download Esther in Medieval Garb: Jewish Interpretation of the Book of Esther in the Middle Ages (S U N Y Series in Judaica) PDF. Best Sacred Writings books. construction on contemporary reports of the oralwritten interface in medieval, Greco-Roman and historical close to japanese contexts, David Carr argues that during historical Israel Biblical texts and different texts emerged as a help for an academic strategy during which written and oral dimensions. have been integrally intertwined.

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SUNY Series in Judaica : Hermeneutics, Mysticism, and Religion. by: Wechsler, Michael G. Published: (2008). Daylight at Midnight : Reflections for Women on Esther.

Esther in Medieval Garb: Jewish Interpretation of the Book of Esther in the Middle Ages. This paper explores the connection of the petuhah and setumah divisions in the Masoretic tradition with the different arrangement of pericopae in MT and LXX as well as the insertion of literary units in either text

This comprehensive history, the first to appear in English, gives a vivid portrayal of the Book of Esther’s role in the intellectual and cultural life of Jews in the Middle Ages. Much of the study is based on material that exists only in manuscripts, and it introduces many exegetes hitherto unknown or unstudied.
User reviews
Tantil
Very useful collection for people who want to see how Esther was viewed in the Middle Ages.
Inabel
Most Jews’ knowledge about the book of Esther is limited to the plain meaning of the text, and maybe some Talmud-era midrash. But this book shows that in the late Middle Ages, quite a few European rabbis wrote about Esther; their interpretations were often quite different from those of the Talmud.

For example, after Aristotle was translated into Hebrew, some commentators used philosophy to help decipher Esther’s ambiguities. Abraham Hadidah, a Spanish rabbi, suggested that the Persian king removed his first queen in order to preserve his honor, and added a discussion from Aristotle’s Ethics.

Other exegetes used their own experiences to interpret Esther. Because astrology was still respectable, Gersonides and Ibn Ezra (two other medieval rabbis) suggested that the king’s “wise men” might have been astrologers.

Some commentators compared the villains of Esther to Christians and Muslims. Spanish rabbi Abraham Saba compared the book’s foolish king to Arabs (who he viewed as “lacking in wisdom and science”) while comparing the clever slanderer Haman to European Christians.

Other commentators were familiar with monarchical courts, and used this knowledge to interpret Esther. Gersonides found fifty-one ethical lessons in Esther- most of which were more relevant to courtiers than to, say, a blacksmith. For example, Gersonides notes that Haman overstepped his bounds when asking the king for a variety of honors, but praises him for consulting his wife.

Until King Ferdinand expelled the Jews from Spain in 1492, Spanish kings generally defended Jews from nobles and clergy- and even the worst European kings generally preferred theft and expulsion to genocide. So Spanish rabbis, unlike the Talmud, tended to judge the Persian king in Esther favorably. For example, when Haman requested the “destruction” (3:9) of an unnamed people, some rabbis wrote that the king assumed he meant property confiscation rather than genocide.